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O Gauge in the Australian Outdoors
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 Posted: Tue Apr 14th, 2015 10:36 pm
   
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pipopak
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... nice colours!. Jose.



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 Posted: Tue Apr 14th, 2015 10:58 pm
   
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Robert Comerford
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Another go.

Here it is at the start






Here it is a short time later.  :>;)




regards
Bob

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 Posted: Wed Apr 15th, 2015 09:10 am
   
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Herb Kephart
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Well Bob, you solved one of the biggest (to me, and others of my vintage) detriments to outdoor railroads by building up off the ground--minimizing bending over!

What is the gray sub-roadbed material?  Looks to be bendable, and yet sufficiently rigid to span fair distances between supports. Another good move IMHO, is to have a lead into the shed so that you don't have to handle the equipment at the start and end of each operating session. 

Keep us ''in the loop'' (N. American pun)


Herb



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 Posted: Wed Apr 15th, 2015 07:31 pm
   
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Robert Comerford
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Hi Herb, I finally remembered I had promised you I would post some of my work here.

The base structure is steel C section. A friend cut and welded sections up for me as a favour for teaching him to fly r/c. I had suggested octagonal but he was keen to see a smooth curve. Basically the frame is his work, I just did what I was told.
The baseboard top is a fibrous sheet usually used here for lining bathrooms.

I have followed the lead of other O gauge modellers here who have had layouts up at table height outdoors for many years. Certainly easier on the back and the layout stays cleaner as the wind blows most leaves off down to ground level.

regards
Bob Comerford

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 Posted: Wed Apr 15th, 2015 08:21 pm
   
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Robert Comerford
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Here is a closeup of the method used to switch the frog polarity.
The trackwork is Peco code 124. Not in any way correct for NSWGR but outdoors... who cares? It has the advantage of not requiring me to lay thousands of oversized matches and is the only brand of plastic O gauge track with proven ability to handle the UV levels in the Australian sun.




I have of course bonded the closure and point rails to the stock rails.

Operation is by DCC using radio control throttles. A while back I had to make a decision. I ran the layout for a while with both battery/radio and DCC. Track power won the day as I like to mainly sit and watch trains and I get to keep my sound decoders. Over the last summer I have not cleaned locomotive wheels and the only track cleaning has been to remove some bird poo once or twice. I use powdered graphite as a spark suppressant/ contact improver and if there is any sign of hesitation I just paint a little mixed with kerosene onto a couple of inches of  track and let the wheels do the rest. I have saved myself hours of mucking about with battery charging. The ideal for me would be a combination of both methods, direct radio DCC, enough onboard battery (using the batteries of my choice) to prevent stalled locos and do away with point wiring and with charging through the track. Commercially it is under way but is not there yet for me.

regards
 Bob

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 Posted: Thu Apr 16th, 2015 08:19 am
   
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Tramcar Trev
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I may try the kero and graphite trick, I'm fed up with cleaning track and overhead.



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 Posted: Thu Apr 16th, 2015 06:53 pm
   
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Robert Comerford
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Hi Trev, you must have more patience than me. I decided long ago that any more overhead would be dummy and I would run my electric stock as 2-rail. All that fun of watching the overhead spark means lots more cleaning I noticed.

Gordon didn't exist when I lived in Canberra. Those were the days when we could go skinny dipping at Kambah Pool and Pine Island. :>)
regards
Bob

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 Posted: Thu Apr 16th, 2015 07:34 pm
   
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Robert Comerford
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Most of my stock is home made..... cardboard, scrap wood from my r/c plane bin, tie wire, styrene etc. I buy my wheels mainly from Slaters as there is no local supplier (or more correctly the only one is in his 90's) so I chose to use BRMSB/GOG standards by default.
Gearboxes are from Roxey Moldings and bogies and axleguards are from a variety of suppliers both local and overseas. Some of my locos have modified HO mechs.

There are a few 7mm finescale NSWGR items for sale these days but my budget won't allow me to wander in that direction very often.  Prices reflect the small potential market.

The Hunter Valley had a sea of 4 wheel coal hoppers that lasted into the 1980's. As a kid I would be fascinated by the long rakes of these wagons being hauled behind ancient steam engines on yearly train trips to the city.

I am making a rake of 12 (to start) to run. Their shades of red and light grey should add a bit of colour as the government stock was basically 50 shades of (dark) grey. Here is a photo of part of the production line.



My usual method of compensation will not fit this type of wagon so I am making use of some sprues from Parkside Dundas which have axleboxes that slide up and down in the W irons.

Info on the real thing can be found here.
http://fourwheelsnoaircoal.blogspot.com.au/2009/05/hunter-valley-coal-wagons.html

regards
 Bob

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 Posted: Sat Apr 18th, 2015 01:43 am
   
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Shoulders
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Hi Bob

Very impressed with that sub-bed frame work, I know your modelling o gauge but shall show to some of my large scale live steamer friends.

Cheers Dan



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 Posted: Sat Apr 18th, 2015 02:24 am
   
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Ray Dunakin
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Nice work!



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