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Salada
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One of a few similar "locos" built by Aveling & Porter, Rochester, Kent, England. No prizes for guessing their main product was road-going steam traction engines.

This one had a Fowler compound cylinder block, the only one so fitted. Built 1895, it ran until 1954 in service - now restored & occasionally steamed.













What do you notice about the motion ?

Copyright: public Internet site.


Regards,                   Michael

(with apologies to Jose)

Si.
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FUGLY !!

Seems like a 'slight' design-problem, with the connecting-rods !!

Looks like they didn't make the funnel high enough either.

60 years service though ! ...
... WOW ! they don't make 'em like THAT anymore.

Cheers.

Si.

:moose:

pipopak
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Looks like there is a gear set behind the odd-shaped green cover above the wheels, better seen in the second pic. No idea what the "rods" may be. Hopefully NOT to keep the wheels from wandering around!
I'll get you Michael!. Jose.

pipopak
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Si. wrote:... WOW ! they don't make 'em like THAT anymore.Seems that the steampunk movement is old news... Jose.

Bernd
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Looks more like a fat girl with big boobs to me.:us:???

Bernd

Helmut
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Seems that the term 'geared loco' can be applied...

Alwin
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Ehmm, I like it.... Any photo's from a different angle?

Alwin

NevadaBlue
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I think it is beautiful! The design evolved, with chain drives and gear drives like that one. I have a later model, a favorite of mine, in mind for a model.
I think the 'tie rods' are stabilizers. The huge gears behind the wheels would make quite a thrust on the wheels and the rods would counter act that.

Sir Vincent is the one I want to model and this pic shows a clear view of the gears.

Last edited on Fri Apr 17th, 2015 02:54 pm by NevadaBlue

chasv
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:old dude::thumb::Crazy::shocked:

Bernd
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Mmmm.......pistons on the boiler driving gears down the side to the drive wheels. Is this a steam locomotive wanting to be a steam tractor or was it a steam tractor that had s#$ change? L:  :us:

Bernd

Last edited on Fri Apr 17th, 2015 03:58 pm by Bernd

Helmut
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"Sir Vincent" being "Sydenham" in disguise, all Aveling&Porters are steam tractors going for 'moves in predestined grooves'

pipopak
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... anyway, probably the design was not a big success... Jose.

Helmut
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Apart from the fact that the Brits never throw away anything useful - 59 years of service aren't that bad either.

NevadaBlue
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I really do think they are traction engines on rails. Look on the other side for a HUGE flywheel too.

Helmut
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Here are some more A&P's on rails.

Si.
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Hi Helmut.

" Apart from the fact that the Brits never throw away anything useful - 59 years of service aren't that bad either."

No...
...that's the Scotish.

Si.

:moose:

pipopak
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Helmut:
I admit defeat. You outdid me finding nuttery. Jose.

Helmut
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@Jose
I consider this thread as a joint venture:mex: No sweat!

Salada
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Well, that stirred you all up a bit !   Your turn Jose !!

Regards,      Michael

Javelina
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Ken,
I think you nailed it with your "side rod" explanation. The force of keeping everything in mesh would be considerable and take a toll on the axle bearings. Those links would mitigate the problem.
Kind of looks like the manufacturer designed the boiler/cylinder combination so it could be used on road tractors or rail locos as required. Clever idea if you ask me.
Fred Dibnah would love it, but he loved everything that steamed.
Lou

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Ken & Lou,

Aveling's main business was making road going steam traction engines, as I mentioned at the start. They simply took their existing tractor design & modified it slightly for RR use.

The "wheel/axle centre tie rod" is a little strange. Their normal road tractors only drove on the rear axle of course, the front axle being steerable (no kingpins or Mac struts, the whole front axle beam turns on a steam tractor). The usual system with steam road tractors was that everything was attached to the boiler shell, there was no chassis or frames as such, unlike almost all RR steam locos. Therefore they may have thought it necessary to add extra rigidity to the wheel base, especially as both axles appear to be driven. Looking at the photos, & others of the same make, it appears that the whole thing was unsprung, unless there is some form of suspension hidden deep inside the beast.

Regards,                      Michael

Helmut
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Now, let's get away from such ordinary tractors as built by A&P - have a look at this. That's Beardmore before he reverted to building taxis and hire cars...

Last edited on Mon Apr 20th, 2015 07:57 pm by Helmut

Salada
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Thanks Helmut - I never knew such things existed. Also a surprising number of traction engine makers who had a go at producing "traction engine locos".

I wonder how they got the axle weight v traction correct between the flanged rail wheels (guidance around curves) & the rubber drive tyres ?. What happened over undulating ground either side of the sleeper/tie ends ?. Floating sprung drive axle ?.

Regards,                Michael

Ray Dunakin
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Very interesting and unusual locos!

Thorsten K
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.... But the sound .... :)


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