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Salada
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The only UK electric locos I ever had an affinity for, the  British Rail Class 76 (also known as Class EM1) were built 1951-1953 adjacent to my early childhood home. They came thundering past at what seemed an amazingly high speed (compared to steamers) with long coal trains/mixed freight.

Built to run on 1,500V DC they were limited to run on the very busy Woodhead route, an early UK electrification scheme but the only one built to 1,500V DC so when, idiotically, the line was closed in 1981 these locos days were finished, despite being very reliable & having many years life left in them.

Some way ahead of their time by UK standards they had vacuum & air & regen braking.
Unusually, as you can see, the buffers & coupling hook/chain were attached directly to the bogie (truck).







Copyright : Ben Woodbank


Regards,               Michael

jtrain
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In Europe, the only engines I ever really took a liking to were NSB El. 13 locomotives. They look similar to what is shown in the photos.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSB_El_13

What I also like about the Norweigian State Railways is that the locomotives they use, just like in America, are several decades old mixed with modern counterparts. The El. 13 was produced from 1957-1966 and about a dozen or so are still in regular service out of the 37 ever made.

The American equivalent would be an SD40 or a GP40... Both are still found all over the country despite being built in a bygone era.

--James:java:

Salada
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Hello James, they used to build things to last back then. Also, older generation diesels & electrics had none of the sometimes fault prone sophisticated modern electronics and computer systems of newer locos. 

Regards,               Michael

Si.
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Mine ?

Pennsylvania GG-1...

...no question !

:moose:

Si.

Herb Kephart
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OOOH

let's see--

N&W and Virginian ''Hammerheads''

PRR ''Big Liz'' (unfortunately only one built)

Milwaukee Bi-Polars

NYC S Motors (also Bi-polars)

Swiss ''Crocodiles''

All unfortunately not possible to do justice to in 1/48 unless you have a lot of space to let them ''stretch their legs'' 

That's enough for a start.


Herb

Salada
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How about some photos then Herb ??

No-one has queried why the pantie height is set so high ?. There is a reason, partly related to steam locos also using this route.

"pantie" of course = pantograph in case any of you had other thoughts.

Regards,    Michael

jtrain
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I assumed pantograph height was determined like power lines, it's got to be a safe distance up in the air so nothing can accidentally touch it, but I suppose steam locomotives using the same tracks would make sense as well.

As for my favorite American electric locomotive, it would have to be the Ef-4 "Little Joe". They ran terribly at first, like anything built for the Russians, but several hundred loads of cement and a rewiring, the locomotives were put to work most famously by the Milwaukee Road on their Montana Rocky Mountain Division.

Here's a photo via wikipedia:



As far as electrics go, Little Joes were quite hansome.

--James:java:

Bernd
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Oh, goodie. My favorite kind of power. Electric.

Got one of these:



Got two of these:



And a couple kitbashed engines not complete.









Now all I need to do is finish up on other projects to get to these guys. L:

Bernd

 

Salada
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James: That Ef-4 looks a powerful loco.

Bernd: That pair of dark liveried locos of yours look very European, almost Swiss ?.


The overhead wire on the former Woodhead route was set extra high because of its' proximity to many steam loco water columns.

Regards,              Michael

Helmut
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@Michael
Here's my favourite - when they still ran trains out of Haydarpasha. Gone are the times I was sitting next to the driver there....

Salada
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(Helmut's favourite) - so presumably another example of Helmut's Turkish Delight ??!!

Selamlar,       Michael

Si.
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Gee it's a GG !



Pennsys finest ... the GG-1

:moose:

jtrain
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Little Joe's and GG-1's are among the most powerful built in their respective eras.

--James:java:

Si.
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The Pennsy design criteria was aparently for a loco to pull 12 to 14 car passenger trains.

A few were 'regeared' for freight service.

#4800 was the only GG-1 with a 'riveted' body !

( perhaps in the Pennsylvania shops ... with a ' Herb 'O' Rivet ' (TM) ? )



:thumb:


Bernd
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Salada wrote: James: That Ef-4 looks a powerful loco.

Bernd: That pair of dark liveried locos of yours look very European, almost Swiss ?.


The overhead wire on the former Woodhead route was set extra high because of its' proximity to many steam loco water columns.

Regards,              Michael


Those are Great Northern Y-1's.

Bernd

wahiba
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For me it is no contest.
It has to be the Milwaukee Bi-Polars. All those axles each with a motor as part of it.David

Si.
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Some pix. (for Michael !) of the well documented GG-1 train-wreck...

...which is said to have inspired the end of the Hollywood movie ' Silver Streak '.











Brakes failed.

The engineer stayed in the cab blowing the horn, all the way to the end...
...& remarkably, got out of the GG-1 cab and walked away without incident.

No one was killed in the wreck; mainly due to the fact his horn blowing alerted people in the station terminus.
The train plowed through the end-stops & on to the main concourse...
...then the floor collapsed & the loco fell into the basement freight area below !

Si.

:doh:

Ray Dunakin
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Getting that loco out of the basement had to be a "fun" job.

Helmut
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Now I know what a pitfall to be avoided looks like...

Si.
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Hi guys.

That same loco, was actualy FULLY repaired in the P.R.R shops...
...& carried on running.

I believe it is now in fact in a U.S museum...
...can't remember where at the moment.

Si.

:moose:


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