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New 1/45 forum
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 Posted: Sun Aug 16th, 2015 05:21 am
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Tim H
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Hi,

The market for European* trains is somewhat odd, the British use only 1/43 and naturally favour their domestic railways whilst the other nations of Europe use 1/45 (to a lesser extent 1/43) for their domestic railways.

There are at least three German forums for modellers of 1/45 outline. but for those who do not feel comfortable outside of their language zone, there was nothing, until now......

There is a new open access forum specifically for those who model European outline, the 1to45 Forum

It is not affiliated to any society, no membership fees, no advertising and it is a really simple format.

So, if you like European outline*, step aboard because a warm welcome awaits you.

Tim and btw, thanks to Herb for his encouragement.:2t:

*Now the embarrassing bit, the British don't really see themselves as Europeans, so European outline is anything except British Railways.

 

 



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 Posted: Sun Aug 16th, 2015 11:11 pm
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Bob D
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Good luck Tim with your forum :apl:

I often wonder why we have all these different scales that are so close to one another. I'd like to see a group of engines or rolling stock side-by-side that represents all our different scales, just to see how much difference there is.

Bob D.



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 Posted: Mon Aug 17th, 2015 01:22 pm
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Wolfgang C
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Hi Tim,

it is interesting that somebody from outside Europe (the British Isles) is interested in our prototypes. Besides the German forums that you mentioned I came across some very good forums in French which made me regret that I was so lazy at school.

My main interest are prototypes from northern America but I wish you all the best with your new start and will follow
your forum.

Cheers,

Wolfgang

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 Posted: Mon Aug 17th, 2015 01:36 pm
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Tim H
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Hi Guys,

The forum really fills a niche market rather than general purpose, it provides somewhere for those who like German/Swiss/French outline in O gauge.

Btw I always wondered why Lenz produced in 1/45 rather than 1/43 and the explanation was rather simple. The correct gauge for 1/43 should be 32.99mm (the Scale Seven people use 33mm) whilst 32mm is almost spot-on for 1/45.

Pretty obvious when you think about it.

Tim



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 Posted: Mon Aug 17th, 2015 08:30 pm
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Robert Comerford
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O gauge as invented by the Germans was to 1:45.
It is not hard to see how such anomalies as 7mm came about. To cater for their main market at the time, the cashed up British middle and upper classes, an easy conversion was needed for a metricated work force and plans arriving in feet and inches. Hence the mm to the foot rule.
With metric measuring tools like hens teeth in the USA then 1/4" to the foot became a convenient measurement when they got into O gauge.
What surprised me was to discover recently that the French used 7mm as I had always taken all of continental Europe to use the original correct scale.
I can remember articles about some American modellers using 17/64" as the 1:45 conversion ratio to make their models more closely aligned to the track gauge. I can't think of a more awkward measurement to work with so I guess they made their own scale rules or perhaps converted everything to inches and divided by 45 on a slide rule.

regards
Bob Comerford

again,good luck.

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 Posted: Thu Apr 7th, 2016 02:26 am
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Tom T
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Doesn't 17/64 work out to be 43.5 which is thought to be the basis of Half Oh (HO) (1/87)?

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 Posted: Thu Apr 7th, 2016 03:25 pm
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W C Greene
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I think that it was the late Bob (?) Hegge who built the Crooked Mountain Lines traction layout in 17/64 running on "O gauge" track. Mr. Hegge used to show up in the old RMC and MR with his line. Fantastic modeling. He used code 100 rail on this layout and it has influenced me toward small rail ever since.

43, 45, 48...whetever...it's all cool. I have been told that I should be modeling 33, 34, 35.956789 or whatever. Just have fun and run a train today...
Woodie



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 Posted: Thu Apr 7th, 2016 11:23 pm
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Robert Comerford
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Tom, HO is a British invention, even though they eventually went commercially with OO on HO gauge track.
Half O is 3.5mm/foot which is half O scale at 7mm/foot.

17/64 would be close to 1:45... the closest commercial scale correct for the gauge.

regards
Bob

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 Posted: Fri Apr 8th, 2016 12:51 am
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Robert Comerford
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Hi Woodie, all my readings of Bob Hegge's magnificent Crooked Mountain Lines state it was 1/4" scale. He just used code 100 rail (as you state) with finer standard profile wheels on O Gauge track. One of my inspirations too!
regards
Bob

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 Posted: Tue Apr 12th, 2016 08:29 pm
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Helmut
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This whole business started when the BSME decided upon gauges in the late 1890's- there were # 0, 1, II, III, IV, VII, and X gauges.
0 was set to be 1 1/4"
Later on, when the concern about a scale/gauge ratio became important, the ratio for 0 gauge was 1:45, which seemed to be not  too popular amongst the imperial measurement's faction (although they set the standard in the beginning )
And Half-0 had made its appearance ( mind you, in 1935 they started with 1/8" to the foot in the US ), some voted for 7mm scale after H0 had been determined to be 3.5mm/foot, but the US boys, loving their inch fractions, preferred 1/4" instead of 17/64"
The same happened to #7 gauge - around the globe it is 7 1/4", only in US again, it is 7 1/2", too. The exact gauge of 7 1/16" for 1 1/2" scale didn't get hold, either. No wonder that gauge was called 'Blacksmith Gauge' at a time.



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