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In-ko-pah RR: The Dos Manos Depot
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 Posted: Wed Sep 23rd, 2015 11:12 pm
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Ray Dunakin
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Back in May I did a foam core mockup for the Dos Manos depot:




Now I've finally started to work on the actual model of the depot. First I disassembled the mockup and worked out the size and position of doors and windows for each wall. As you can see by my scribblings this involved some trial and error:




Then I laid out the final design on a 16" x 20" sheet of 6mm thick Sintra PVC board, and cut it out:




Before going any further, I wanted to work out exactly what kind of stone and masonry the building would have. I decided on light tan sandstone in random courses for the bulk of the structure. Then I did a small test piece to see if I could successfully replicate that look using Sintra PVC board. Here's how the test piece turned out. I'm pleased with it:




With that settled, it was time to start texturing the first wall of the building. The first step in this process is to lightly sand the surface using a sanding block and horizontal strokes. This removes the sheen, and the fine scratches add a very subtle texture. Next, I used sandpaper wrapped around a dowel. This was applied with a scrapping motion, horizontally across the face of the wall. This added some more prominent scratches:




This close up view shows the scratches. Most of them will be obscured by the rest of the process, so they don't have to be perfect:




The next step involves tapping on the surface with a rock to give it a rough, uneven texture. For this you need a rock that isn't too rough or too smooth. Here's the rock I used:




After going over the entire surface with the rock, I used a t-square and pencil to lightly draw a series of horizontal lines on the wall. These will be used as guides when scribing the stone courses. Because I'm simulating random courses, the lines don't have to be evenly spaced:






That's it for now, more later. Enjoy!



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 Posted: Thu Sep 24th, 2015 12:56 am
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NevadaBlue
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That stone work is amazing Ray. I'd like to see more on how you do that when you get time. Where do you get sintra? I've never heard of it except in your structures.



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Ken

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 Posted: Thu Sep 24th, 2015 01:58 am
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Ray Dunakin
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Thanks. I'll be explaining the whole process as I go along on this building.

You can get Sintra from this online source:

http://www.foamboardsource.com/sintra-pvc-foam--sintra-pvc-board.html

They have it in a wide range of sizes, and in thicknesses from 1mm to 13mm. If you have a plastics dealer in your area they might also carry, possibly under a different name, and only in larger sheets.



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 Posted: Thu Sep 24th, 2015 04:21 pm
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Wolfgang C
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Fantastic stonewall, Ray. I also admire the very realistic colors that you used. Please show us more details.

Wolfgang

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 Posted: Fri Sep 25th, 2015 08:31 pm
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Ray Dunakin
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Time for a quick update!

I began scribing the stones on the first wall of the depot. The stones are scribed using an ordinary, carbide-tipped metal scribe from the hardware store. The tool is pressed firmly into the surface -- with Sintra, you're not really scratching it, you're indenting it. Here are a few photos of my progress:









I still have to scribe the upper area of the wall (the second story portion). When this wall is done I have several more walls to do. By the time I'm finished with this building I'm going to be pretty tired of scribing stones!



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 Posted: Fri Sep 25th, 2015 10:19 pm
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NevadaBlue
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This is very interesting for sure. Are you dragging the point of the scribe, like making a little ditch in the foam? It will be worth the tedium it appears.



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Ken

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 Posted: Fri Sep 25th, 2015 10:29 pm
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Ray Dunakin
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NevadaBlue wrote:
This is very interesting for sure. Are you dragging the point of the scribe, like making a little ditch in the foam?

Yes, that's correct.



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 Posted: Mon Sep 28th, 2015 08:26 pm
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Ray Dunakin
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Well, I finally finished scribing the first wall:






But there are still a few things to do that will give the wall more depth and realism. First off, some of the scribed stones are a bit flat and could benefit from additional texturing. For this, I'll use a small scrap of old patio flagstone:




Here's a "before" shot of a small section of the wall, showing some of the stones that need additional work:




I tapped those areas with the piece of flagstone, and here's how it looks now:




Another little trick to add depth is to carve out a few random stones, using a sharp #11-blade hobby knife, as I've done here:




There is still one more thing I want to do, which will extend some of the stones out a little from the surface of the wall. However, I have to wait until after the walls have been assembled. Also I need to scribe some mortar lines in the edges of the door and window openings, and touch up a few cut marks, etc.



That's it for now. Enjoy!



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 Posted: Mon Sep 28th, 2015 09:36 pm
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chasv
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:moose::moose::moose::moose:



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Charles
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 Posted: Mon Sep 28th, 2015 11:42 pm
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NevadaBlue
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Excellent Ray! I like those 'cut' stones. Especially if modeling an old building, many times the stones start to crumble and that last technique mimics that nicely too.



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