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In-ko-pah RR: The Dos Manos Depot
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 Posted: Thu Oct 22nd, 2015 02:21 am
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Ray Dunakin
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Because this depot will sit so close to the "edge" of the layout, a detailed interior is a necessity! However, this is the first building I've made with an interior that is also visible from all four sides. Previous structures had the rear wall against a cliff, allowing me to make that wall removable. (It also cut down on the amount of exterior detailing!) The interiors could be built into a box that slides out the back of the building.

On the depot, the interior box has to be accessible from below. Not a big deal but it does complicate things a bit. For one thing, the way I make and install the windows, they extend into the building slightly. So the box has to clear the windows and avoid damaging the shades/curtains.

I built a recessed rim and spacers in the main structure. The rim creates an overlapping seal to help keep out moisture, as well as giving me something to put the screws into that will be used to secure the interior. Here's a view from the underside:




And here's a view from the top. I haven't installed the spacer on the wall at right yet, because I'm debating whether or not to add a window to that wall:




Here's the box which will contain the interior. The ceiling is removable and held in place with small screws:








Here's a shot of the underside of the building, with the box temporarily installed. For this shot I only used two screws, instead of the six that will eventually be used:




Note that the floor of the west wing (baggage/freight area) is also removable. This room will not have interior details.


Here's a shot looking down from the top. The second floor windows will have closed curtains, eliminating the need for detailing the second floor. Only a light will be installed there, to shine through the curtains:




As you can see, I've also installed the bracing for the roof of the west wing, and will soon add bracing for the main roof:

Last edited on Thu Oct 22nd, 2015 02:31 am by Ray Dunakin



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 Posted: Fri Oct 23rd, 2015 12:50 am
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NevadaBlue
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Looking good Ray. This thread will be a go-to resource for anyone wanting to build a building from scratch. I know I'm using it for reference. Thanks for keeping us in the loop.



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 Posted: Fri Oct 23rd, 2015 12:53 am
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Ray Dunakin
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The depot sits between two tracks, and one of the tracks curves inward a bit. To accommodate the reduced clearance, I had to taper the east wing on the south side:




Because the east wing is an odd shape, I decided to go with a flat roof and parapet, rather than a peaked roof. I feel this will also give the building more visual interest, and I've seen photos of a couple prototype, mission-style depots that had a flat roof on one end. I put together a mockup of the east wing and taped it to the model to see how it will look:






Before I start cutting up Sintra, I'd like to hear what others think of this design for the east wing.



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 Posted: Fri Oct 23rd, 2015 03:13 pm
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Herb Kephart
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Non-rectangular buildings are quite common here, especially in urban ares--but that's not the case here. I think that buildings, built to fit the contours and physical limitations of the plot, add immensely towards making a scene ''believable''

So, my feeling is--GO FOR IT!

Herb



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 Posted: Fri Oct 23rd, 2015 04:08 pm
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Salada
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I'm with Herb - so long as the correct prototype loading gauge clearance is maintained.
It looks sufficiently like a Mission Style RR building that the "angled" bit would look OK. IMO !.

Regards,          Michael

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 Posted: Sat Oct 24th, 2015 12:42 am
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Ray Dunakin
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Thanks for the input, I appreciate it!



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 Posted: Tue Nov 17th, 2015 01:00 am
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Ray Dunakin
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I accidentally posted this in the wrong place, so now I'm reposting it here...

About a year ago I found a sheet of 13mm Sintra in the cutoff bin at a local plastics dealer, and I've been holding onto it ever since. I decided to use this to make the arched walls of the passenger waiting area. I don't know if it's because this stuff was old, or what, but it was quite a bit harder than the 6mm stuff I've been using, and was kind of a pain to work with. I had to use a jigsaw to cut it. I also found it more difficult to scribe. It might have been easier if I'd just laminated two sheets of 6mm Sintra together, to get the required thickness. Anyway...

After cutting it out, I taped the plugs from the arches in place temporarily, to hold a pushpin marking the center of the arch. Then I scribed the stones around the arch, using a small metal ruler as a guide:




When I'd finished scribing the stones on the face of the wall, I used a special tool to continue the mortar lines around the corners onto the edges of the arches. This was just an X-Acto knife, with the edge of the blade ground flat:






Here is the exterior side of the wall. It is complete except for some details that will be added after assembly. As you can see, I have changed the shape of the wall's top edge from the original design:




Here's the interior side of the same wall. When I shot this photo, I still had to scribe a few more lines near the top. On the left end, there was no need to include all the scribing since that is where the adjoining wall will be glued to this one:




That's all for now. I still have two more walls to do for this part of the depot.



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 Posted: Tue Nov 17th, 2015 01:31 am
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pipopak
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Me thinks it would be easier to scribe the brick faces before cutting the arches openings. Jose.



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 Posted: Fri Nov 20th, 2015 03:44 am
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George W
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Wow, talk about time consuming, but what a great result !



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 Posted: Fri Nov 20th, 2015 05:34 am
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Ray Dunakin
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Yeah, and it's even more time consuming because it's so tedious that I have to take frequent breaks.



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