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Dirty Stuff
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 Posted: Tue Jul 5th, 2016 10:19 am
   
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Rod Hutchinson
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Milocomarty wrote:
Spend the day painting a sliding door, still some filters and washes to do..



Martin, what were the steps on the sliding door.



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 Posted: Tue Jul 5th, 2016 10:53 am
   
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Milocomarty
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Use a wide bruh on the roof, remove the excess with a wedged make-up sponge. Panels on the sides with pin wash and these painted lines wiped gently with a soft flat brush moistened in thinner..



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 Posted: Tue Jul 5th, 2016 11:43 pm
   
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Milocomarty
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Slow but steady progress, first layer on the sides is on, just a little detail to be added. Its a company car so it will be dirty but not neglected..just have to figure out what roof cover they used on a German G30..





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 Posted: Fri Jul 8th, 2016 01:07 am
   
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Milocomarty
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Simple weathering with pinwashes, used an Athearn RtoR boxcar for this that I bought cheap on an expo.
Although the car had a nice green finish I'm a strong believer that paint fades rapidly oer time. So to start the fade.
Step 1: Used a mixture of Vallejo wash white and olive green to mix a light green color to fade, applied it with nd airbrush in several thin layers using the air out of the brush to speed dry the wash. I own a couple of double action brushes.
Step 2: Overall finish with a satin varnish (also Vallejo in this case)
Step 3: Start to pinwash on al the cravets, rivets and other deeper parts with a dark wash, used Ammo wash for Nato camouflage in this case.
Step 4: Remove the excess wash with a damp brush dipped in odourless thinner and dapped on a paper towel to remove the excess thinner. Clean the brush on the towel when needed
Step 5: Add streaks already by using a wide flat damp brush and wipe it gently over the surface.

Car is ready for more weathering steps..











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 Posted: Fri Jul 8th, 2016 01:32 am
   
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Rod Hutchinson
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Thanks Martin,

I saw a similar technique on youtube marking out panel lines on an aircraft. The over paint was used to dirty up the wing surfaces to show the streaking. His was a milder finish than yours.

I would guess the removal of the wash reflects the amount of weathering/streaking you wish to replicate.



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 Posted: Fri Jul 8th, 2016 10:43 am
   
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Milocomarty
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This is all about marking out the lines and detail Rod. The amount of weathering is also set by the colors used. Could use a less dark color for milder lines..



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 Posted: Fri Jul 8th, 2016 06:40 pm
   
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W C Greene
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Man, those are "nicely dirty" and very cool. Some really fine brushwork and the airbrush work ain't bad 'neither!

Woodie



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 Posted: Sat Jul 9th, 2016 12:29 am
   
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Milocomarty
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Thanks Woodie !

Rust, rust, rust, well somekind of it. First time ever I used plain artist oilpaints for this. Dabbed and streaked, and well here is the first result. Paint still wet and I have no idea used to acrylics how long t takes to dry ? What I do like that it is ery forgiven like the enamels and you can create very subtile paterns with it..just used burned umber and burned sienna. Could use a bit of raw umber and some yellow raw sienna perhaps ?











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 Posted: Mon Jul 11th, 2016 03:04 am
   
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iandrewmartin
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Martin;
Thanks for sharing the pictures of the weathered NP box using oils. I usually leave the car to sit, depending on the time of year for at least a couple of days during the warmer months, and up to a week in the cooler months (we're in deep winter here now).

Yes they are more forgiving. And really a joy to work with when you are so used to using acrylics.


This is the first car I worked on (a Walthers kit) in HO.



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 Posted: Mon Jul 11th, 2016 06:31 am
   
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Rod Hutchinson
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Nice job Andrew.



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