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Paper House Building - Testing My New Silhouette Portrait Cutter
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 Posted: Sun Sep 15th, 2019 03:48 am
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Tom Harbin
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Helmut,

Thank you for posting this.

I keep looking at the various paper cutting machines,
and wonder about their true usefulness in the hobby.

I've read everything from how wonderful,
to how utterly useless they are.

The macro shots of the windows say,
they are at least as good, as what I can accomplish by hand.

Tom


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 Posted: Sun Sep 15th, 2019 09:35 am
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Helmut
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They'll show their virtues e.g. when you have to make 20+ identical frames.

Depending on the material and dimensions you use,
the results can be even more pleasing.

Some thin (0.2mm) fine-grain paper on a freshly prepared cutting-mat,
will give very crisp cutouts.

The mat's grip matters much, especially when cutting fine structures.

An in-depth guide to the cutters' use can be found  here




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 Posted: Sun Nov 24th, 2019 09:13 pm
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Si.
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" I keep looking at the various paper cutting machines,
and wonder about their true usefulness in the hobby.

I've read everything from how wonderful,
to how utterly useless they are."


Hi Tom  :wave:


I am intrigued by Paper Cutting Machines ...

... which also can cut thin styrene, as Cor has shown, with his amazing coach.  :shocked:


Cors Freerails Coach Cuttin' Thread





Not really something which 3D-printing would do that well, possibly ...  ???

... custom coach mass-production looks quite doable, after drawing up a design.





Top cuttin' Cor !  :thumb:



:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:



Si.




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 Posted: Mon Dec 2nd, 2019 05:20 pm
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Tom Harbin
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Si,

Cors' coach is really inspiring.

I keep looking at items like the coach, all of the stuff in the 3D printer thread,
and dreaming about building my own designs or some things that you can't find commercially.

I droll over paper-cutters, CNC mills and 3D printers.
Then, reality sets in.

The tool is still only as good as its input.
I can't even use track-planning software effectively, let alone CAD.

If I try to play hangman,
I need to get a proxy to do the drawing part.

I think I may spend some time playing with TinkerCAD or similar,
to see if one of these products is good enough to do the hard part for me.

Tom


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 Posted: Mon Dec 2nd, 2019 05:49 pm
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slateworks
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Tom, I sympathise totally with you.

I'm not normally a negative person but I've tried to learn CAD,
even had a stab at Tinkercad which I was told was simple,
and failed miserably at that.

:bang:

So I look for alternative ways to produce things and I suppose the good thing is,
that it makes me endeavour to improve my hand marking and cutting skills!  






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 Posted: Mon Dec 2nd, 2019 06:17 pm
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John Boshier
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slateworks wrote: 
Tom, I sympathise totally with you.

I'm not normally a negative person but I've tried to learn CAD,
even had a stab at Tinkercad which I was told was simple,
and failed miserably at that.


I doubt if you've ever done any programming Doug,
but OpenSCAD uses a programming language to do the drawing,
rather than dragging a mouse around the screen.

Although you need to learn the language,
it's more like giving the computer a written instruction,
like "Starting at this point, draw a rectangle (or cylinder etc.) this size".

Most model railway items can be drawn,
using what OpenSCAD calls Cubes, Cylinders and Spheres.

Of course it's still not easy, as you're trying to do something complicated,
but it's a different approach that may work for some people.




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 Posted: Mon Dec 2nd, 2019 06:17 pm
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Tom Harbin
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Doug,

Your comment has me doing some thinking,
and a little soul-searching.

I wonder if the issue is aptitude or attitude or even ineptitude?
By all rights, I should be able to do simple CAD work.

I know the basic principles,
in fact I was one of the project managers that worked with SGI
(Silicon Graphics - their old headquarters is now the Googleplex or whatever they call it)
for another computer manufacturer. 

When I was in high school,
one of my shop teachers tried to convince me to go into drafting as a profession,
and even bought me a small drafting set (thank you Mr. Barry) that I still use occasionally.
He thought I had talent.

Hmmmm  L:

I think my issue may be desire.

As much as I like the idea of the results,
I've spent 46 years working with computers daily.

There is something satisfying about low/no tech solutions,
and it is actually one of the things that keeps me enthusiastic about MRR.

I'm even moving from DCC to RCBP,
non-powered track and manual turnout control.

But, you can't argue with the results of the CAD-based solutions.
Somethings are just plain difficult to scratch-build with enough rigidity to really work.
I've re-glued the interior mullions in my dry goods store three times now.
It's getting old.

Tom


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 Posted: Mon Dec 2nd, 2019 06:32 pm
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slateworks
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John (welcome from NGRM by the way!) and Tom, I suspect with me it's largely attitude.

I've never been a great book reader and prefer to do things with my hands,
and whilst I agree that one can't fault the superior results attainable with modern techniques,
the old fashioned hammer and chisel approach does seem to work for me!




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 Posted: Mon Dec 2nd, 2019 07:15 pm
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Tom Harbin
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Doug,

I suspect it is mainly attitude for me as well
(although the aptitude is still suspect).

The main draw of these technologies for me, is the ability to make one piece designs,
where I would patch together multiple pieces, with the resulting reduction in rigidity.

What I think I am getting from this though, is maybe a part way solution.

I'm looking at adding resin-coated paper to my supplies, as my interior sashes are just plain junk.
I like what I get in laser kits that are done on RC paper, so it is worth a try manually.

I may learn how to resin cast as well, but by the time I'm done with that,
I wonder if a 3D printer wouldn't actually be less expensive and more practical.

I should start reading European MRR magazines,
since there are many techniques you use that are "foreign" to us yanks.

Since I've canceled almost all of my subscriptions to almost everything,
that isn't going to happen.

I go looking for driver sets and always end up at a UK site,
then get thoroughly confused, and go back to cutting wood for some building or other. 

The results you receive using a chisel and hammer are astounding.
If I were you, I wouldn't change a thing.

I look at some of the threads on here and marvel at the authenticity and detail.
Of course I wish I could do as well, maybe I can but I don't think I will.

I've decided that for me, a MRR is like an impressionist painting.

I'm purposely modeling a non-existent railroad with a western-movie motif,
and a totally implausible trackplan because it suits me.

I want it to look realistic but not real.
Kind of like Disneyland with some grime.

Tom   


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 Posted: Mon Dec 2nd, 2019 07:40 pm
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slateworks
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That's great Tom.


I've always said that Rule No.1 should apply - it's my railroad and I'll do it my way!


I do like your buildings which are up there with the best,

and I shall continue to watch developments with great interest.




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