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Jacques B
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As the prototype I selected the house where I was born in Montfort, Belgium.


The flat structure has 4 layers :-

Glass
Window frames and door
Stone wall
Relief details





Jacques B
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First I drew the front wall section.
The stones were drawn one by one.

The pencil drawing was then scanned to produce a '.JPG file' that was directly imported in the 'Silhouette Studio' software, supplied with the Silhouette Portrait cutter.


 

NevadaBlue
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Excellent Jacques.
I know that we will be watching this with great interest.
I like that house a lot and could see a version of it being built here in Nevada.


Jacques B
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Using the 'Silhouette Studio' software, the 5 openings to cut in the wall were located.
The '.studio3 file' was sent to the printer.

The printout of the stone wall, the 5 openings and 3 registration marks to guide the optical system, was then glued to the mat.
The mat was introduced into the cutter and the 5 openings were cut.

I now have a layer with the printed stone wall and the 5 openings cut.

The same '.studio3 file' was used to erase the stones and draw the door and 3 windows at the locations where openings were cut.
The arched portal opening was located and the file was printed.
It was sent to the cutter to cut the arched portal.

A third layer was made for the stone details, and those were cut by the same process.

I added a clear styrene layer for the glass window panes.





Jacques B
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The final picture show the 4 layers better.





Jacques B
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Another  version of the house, made using model builder software.

Where I scanned 3 different layers.





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Jacques

Was the photo of the real building reversed?
I'm wondering why the model is the opposite ''hand''

Herb


Helmut
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@Jacques

The edges of the openings look a bit fuzzy, as if cut by a blunt knife, as do the windows and door frames.
This look is a bit in contrary to what I've read abut the Silhouette's performance so far.
Did you use the heaviest paper possible?


Lest I forget

A link to Pendon's paper modeling howtos.

I had the pleasure of talking to the late Mr. Ireland about his techniques.
A very informative talk that was.
With the Silhouette, one can transfer the painstaking steps into the program's care.


Cor V
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I prefer to use coloured paper thru and thru.

That way you prevent the white paper you can see on the windows.

Cor


Lee B
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Paper modeling is a big thing in the UK.
I often read British model magazines for 'out of the box thinking' as they do things you never see in US magazines.
I've seen some amazing work with paper siding for stone and brick done in those cases.
I am waiting to see what you accomplish here.
It looks good so far!


chasv
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On the other side of the pond they have been pealing the paper off foam core and scribing stone or brick or rock,
and making buildings out of it that are 3D and don't have to cast them.


Jacques B
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NevadaBlue wrote:
Excellent Jacques.
I know that several of us will be watching this with great interest.
I like that house a lot and could see a version of it being built here in Nevada.


Thank you Ken for the kind words.

Yes that house is really beautiful and the stones come from a quarry located ... on the other side of the back yard fence.
Weird place.


Jacques B
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Herb Kephart wrote:  
Was the photo of the real building reversed?
I'm wondering why the model is the opposite ''hand''


Herb,

The building was "mirrored' because it is located at the front edge of the layout,
and it was the only way to increase the track radius so a covered wagon can get inside the brewery.
The 2nd reason is that a brewery vessel will be visible from a large  window located at the side of the building.





Jacques B
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Pic of the brewing vessel





Jacques B
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Helmut wrote: @Jacques

The edges of the openings look a bit fuzzy, as if cut by a blunt knife, as do the windows ' and door frames.
This look is a bit in contrary to what I've read abut the Silhouette's performance so far.
Did you use the heaviest paper possible?


Lest I forget

A link to Pendon's paper modeling howtos.

I had the pleasure of talking to the late Mr. Ireland about his techniques.
A very informative talk that was.
With the Silhouette, one can transfer the painstaking steps into the program's care.


Helmut,

First thank for the link to that great Pendon Museum layout.

I agree, on the "pencil drawn" version the edges  looks fuzzy.
I cut the same building drawn using Model Builder software  ( see Page-1 ) and the edges look better.
I'll post  a picture tomorrow.

And of course the close-up  exaggerates the defects.
So as you, I suspect a blunt knife because I was able to cut cleanly 0.010" styrene.
I'll post another pic tomorrow.

I start to like the Silhouette Portrait and to learn how to use it.
It is very accurate the double-cut is perfect.
It does a better job than my 67 years old eyesight, my Optovisor and my no. 11 Exacto knife   :)

Here is a picture at "normal" distance view





Jacques B
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Cor V wrote:

I prefer to use coloured paper thru and thru.

That way you prevent the white paper you can see on the windows.

Cor


Thank you Cor for the suggestion.

It is not clear to me what you mean.
In our case do you suggest that I should have cut the windows using light brown paper,
so there is no white paper edge showing on the windows ?


Cor V
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Yes, that's what I meant.
Now you can see the white where the paper is cut.

I will try to post some of the things I made with my cutter.

Cor


Jacques B
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Lee B wrote:

Paper modeling is a big thing in the UK.
I often read British model magazines for 'out of the box thinking' as they do things you never see in US magazines.
I've seen some amazing work with paper siding for stone and brick done in those cases.
I am waiting to see what you accomplish here.
It looks good so far!


Thank you Lee for the kind words.

I agree, for whatever reason paper modelling is underestimated in North and South America.

( I have some railroad modelers friends in Brazil )


Jacques B
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Cor,

It would be interesting if you can post a few pictures and explanations of your work using the paper cutting machine.


Jacques B
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chasv wrote:
On the other side of the pond they have been pealing the paper off foam core and scribing stone or brick or rock,
and making buildings out of it that are 3D and don't have to cast them


Charles,

I tried that too.
It is fine for large scales.
I tried to scribe cobblestones for a road in TT scale ( 1/120 ) but the foam texture is too big.


Jacques B
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I'm a homebrewer and a homebaker.
The first thing I tried with the Silhouette cutter is to cut a stencil to sift some flour and decorate the bread.
The stencil was cut in 0.010" Plastruct styrene and as one can see on the picture the cut is quite clean.

The knife was brand new.
The pressure was set to maximum.
I had to finish the cut with a No. 11 Exacto blade.
The  silhouette was set to make 2 passes for the cut.





Jacques B
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To compare ( you'll be the judges ) the windows of the pencil version and the windows of the Model Builder version.

Both were printed on HP matte brochure paper  48 lb or 180g/m2 0.23 mm thick.





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I think the building looks fine.
Of course, if you wanted to, you could color any paper edges with a marker.
That's what I use.

I think the house can become a workshop.
I must remember this thread when I get some modeling time again.


Jacques B
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Thank you Ken for the tip of using a marker to hide the white paper edge.
The Model Builder Project Ideas booklet suggests using colored pastel chalk.


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Jacques,

We (my wife and I, she is quite an artist) have a selection of markers from children's Crayola markers to her fancy ink and paint markers.
I've found that a set of inexpensive felt tip colored markers gives me a good selection for coloring edges to match or contrast as needed.


Helmut
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Gents,

I cannot resist to show you the results of my trials in TT scale.
I bought this cutter (Silhouette Portrait) to speed up the creation of buildings on my modules.

What I found out so far:

Instead of attaching 160gr/m² cardboard to the cutting mat,
you can also tape it on the edges to a sheet of bristol board and use that as support during cutting.
Needless to say that removing the cutouts is child's play afterwards.

I made window frames out of 160 material, too.
The narrowest strip you can get without tearing is 0.8mm wide.
But - caution - never try to draw the openings with the rectangle function.
The cutter will tear everything apart afterwards.
Use the line function and draw all parallel lines ( e.g. for the strips ) in the same direction.
Use corners as either a starting or a meeting point of the two lines you draw.
The cutter will follow their direction afterwards.

Don't expect too much accuracy in small structures - +/- 0.1mm is achieved,
but you see that clearly when the cut is only 2.5mm long.

Here are some pics:





That's what it will look like after the cutter is through.
Always use the other side as the surface to be viewed later.





These are the window frames, the openings are ~2.5x9mm.
One can sand them a bit to make them square.





Here are the built-up windows.
The building's sides were cut out of grey 320gr/m² architectural cardboard.





Here in 3D.
As soon as the viewing distance is greater, the looks start to improve.


Helmut
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Here, greatly magnified, a super-glue reinforced frame that has been sanded.
The dot spacing is 1/16"





I recommend to soak all those small structures in Cyanoacrylate,
it prevents any warping and really makes it easier to touch up contours.

BTW, I noticed that with Edge I don't get the full menu when editing, the second line is not present.
Firefox works out OK.


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I tried 0.2mm styrene, too:





The left one is before the burrs were sanded off.





I think this one looks almost passable.
Only drawback is that you have to cut four times with maximum setting and slowest speed.


Jacques B
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Helmut,

Thank you for posting the progress of your TT scale building.
I too am modelling TT scale ( metric gauge ) so I`m interested to see how it turns out.

I am using some 180 g/m2 HP presentation paper.
Are you using the option of double cut ( cutting the same lines, polygons etc.. twice ) ?

Jacques B


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@Jacques

Yes, I cut them twice, which is sufficient.
Some areas already fall off then.


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One of 62 factory windows that I cut, just set in place in a background building.



Material .017'' ''cover stock'' The stuff that file folders are made from.
Single cut, carbide knife set to protrude about .025''
No numbers on carbide knife carrier.
Heavy coat of Floquil to soak in and stiffen.
Note that there is some fuzz in corners, mainly.
It will have to be sanded before instillation.
The carbide knifes are definitely the way to go.

Now why did I pick a window frame with a bunch of green paint slobbered onto the brick.
Oh well, will look OK from 3' away.


Herb


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Hi Herb,
Nice work. :2t:
Sure beats cutting them all out by hand, huh? :bg:


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@Herr Bert

So you're responsible for me having ordered sets of 45° and 60° CB09 cutters in China!
That frame looks absolutely great.
Now I hope that stuff will find its way to me pronto.


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Thanks guys!

There was NO WAY that I could, or would, cut that many window sash out by hand!

Herb

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I'm glad the Curio finally submitted to you Herb. Pretty cool machine isn't it.

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Yes Ken--but if it weren't for the help that you, Helmut, and others gave, I would have given up.

Yes, John it is an amazing machine.
The most ''bang for the buck'' that a scratch builder can buy, in my opinion.

What some modelers offshore have achieved is simply mind boggling, and my simple mind doesn't boggle easily,
nor do I spend enough time reading the (totally inadequate for a beginner) instructions, I have to admit.

If I can find some time today,
I am trying to draw some simple cornice trim for that building, on the Curio screen,
as apposed to a scanned drawing that the window was.

Again, thanks to all for your help.


Herr Bert


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My mind boggles easily and this machine looks like something I need!

With a background of using CAD and vector imaging software this might be an easy transition from cutting things out by hand.

A lot more investigation into this machine is in order.


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Bob, for sure you want to review the differences between the models.
The Curio was attractive to me because of the moving deck/platform that holds the material to be cut.
It is very versatile.


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Here is my first complete Silhouette Portrait project.
TT scale, metric gauge shed for the Belgian vicinal steam tramway.

Printed on HP matte brochure paper 180 g/sm,  thickness 0.23 mm
Silhouette portrait settings: blade depth 3, speed 4cm/s,  ratchet blade 4, thickness 24, single cut.

The building was drawn using the Model Builder software.
Cutting and folding lines drawn using Inkscape software, file saved as plain SVG  format,
( to keep the dimensions unchanged, saving as inkscape SVG format will scale by 0.8 )
From the Inkscape manual: Plain SVG is the standard SVG without Inkscape-specific markup.
Use Plain SVG for best interoperability with other applications that may be used to open the file.

The building is composed of 4 layers.

The steam tramway body is 3D printed.


Jacques





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This is a really neat machine and I am very, VERY glad that I probably won't be making any more structures on my layout or I might have to eat Ramen and rice for a while to be able to afford one! As Spock would say-"Fascinating!"

Woodie

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Herb Kephart
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Like that tunnel mouth in the background!

Herb

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"Like that tunnel mouth in the background!"

I might try a paper version of the tunnel and the steam tramway body.

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Jacques B wrote:
Here is my first complete Silhouette Portrait project.
TT scale, metric gauge shed.


Nice work Jacques!

Thanks for posting the 'how-to' information with it also.

Did you print directly from Inkscape or did you import it into Studio?
I am guessing that you did import it.
If so, could you share the file here?


Jacques B
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Thank you Ken for the kind words.
The procedure is as follows:

1) I draw and print a rectangular section of brick wall using the Model Builder software.
Of course you can download and print some free brick textures.
2) Start the Silhouette Studio software.
3) Insert the printed brick texture sheet in the scanner.
4) Import the brick texture in the Silhouette Studio software using the File-scan menu.
We now have a .studio3 file containing the brick texture layer.

5) We now have to create a 2nd layer with the cutting lines.
We have several options:
5a) Use the silhouette studio software.
5b) Import a .dxf file drawn with Autocad $$$ using File-Merge menu.
5c) If we upgrade to Silhouette Studio Designer edition, import a .svg file using the File-Merge menu ( my case )

6) Add the registration marks with the Silhouette-Registration Marks menu.

7) Print the .studio3 file containing the brick texture layer, cutting layer and registration marks.

Insert the printed sheet in the cutter and ... cut.


I'll be glad to share my .svg files,
but there might be some copyright infringement if I share the Model Builder texture files.
Is there any attorney on this forum ?


Jacques


Jacques B
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If I build a 2nd version of the engine shed there is room for improvment:

Use pastel chalk to hide the seams where the paper ends at the corners of model.
Calibrate the scanner so the bricks are red and not ... pink.
Weathering.


Jacques


Jacques B
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In order to test the option of importing .pdf files in the Silhouette Studio Designer version (I am not a Silhouette shareholder )
I downloaded  a free building from Scale Scenes

http://scalescenes.com/product/r024-weighbridge-or-coal-office/

Import that .pdf file in Silhouette Portrait:
File-Merge

In the new opened window, select the resolution ( dpi ), select "Import as Vector", UNcheck  Group, click on the " Import " button,
and by miracle all the cutting and scoring lines are there.

I changed the cutting lines color to red.





Jacques B
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I purchased a CB09 blade holder and 5 blades on Ebay from the joycelijane seller.
The items were promptly shipped.
So far I tested the 45 degrees blade and it works as described.


Jacques


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Just for kicks, having two hours' spare time for designing, cutting, and glueing, I put a roof on that lean-to:

Attachment: Hausfront1.jpg (Downloaded 57 times)

Last edited on Fri Oct 14th, 2016 12:17 am by Helmut

Jacques B
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Well done Helmut, will you add some external details, such as windows sils to improve the 3D look ?

Helmut
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@Jacques,
like this you mean?

Attachment: Hausfront2.jpg (Downloaded 104 times)

Jacques B
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Yes Helmut, like that.
Jacques

Herb Kephart
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Helmut

The layering concept works very well, and I like what you have done with it.

I'm waiting for someone to make a laminated card model of, say, a steel passenger car. with the rivet heads embossed with the Sihouette.

I'm still trying to learn how to draw on the machine, without, I must admit, much success.
The link that you gave about turning a JPG file into a GIF seems to work,
but for some reason I'm having problems replicating a basic shape in a line,
so that it looks (and cuts--but I haven't got to that point) like one continuous piece.

Herr Bert


Jacques B
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Herb, google
A Guide to using the Silhouette Cameo Cutter

Jacques

Last edited on Sat Oct 15th, 2016 08:25 pm by Jacques B

Helmut
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@Herb

From what I've read embossing is only reasonably possible with the Curio
( which in turn offers only half the working area of the Cameo ).

A comprehensive guide is here.

There's coach sides and houses  - very in-depth coverage.

And if you follow this link, you get all the advice how to scribe brass sheet.
A little is said about rivets, too.


Helmut
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An attachment to show how I gouged out bricks on Bristol Board in TT scale ( 1x2x0.6mm with 0.1mm mortar layer )


Attachment: TT-Mauerwerk.jpg (Downloaded 78 times)

Helmut
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This evening I played around with plastics on my portrait cutter.
It doesn't like 0,3mm stock, you can only scribe it and cut through with a knife.
Not that pleasing, so I tried thinner material.
And there it was - success with the settings for Coverstock on 0,15mm Plastic sheet.
The dot spacing is 1mm, so that upper horizontal brace is just 0.5mm wide.
Structures that small are almost impossible to cut in cardstock.


Attachment: Fenstertest_Plastik.jpg (Downloaded 53 times)

Cor V
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I have played with thin polyester.

This is used for making technical drawings etc.

Nice stuff and you can make fine cuts in it.

Attached some pictures from a shelf I made with it.





Here you can see the small cuts, the thickness of the material.





That makes it possible to fit them like this together.





And yes the battery is an AA or penlight  :bg:  (true scale)








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I have read plenty of UK-based model train magazines over the years,
and I have seen paper/card structure come up many times there.

My major question has always been one of warping.
In a damp climate like that (and where I live, in the Pacific Northwest),
wouldn't a cardboard structure warp out of shape eventually?

How well would they hold up over time?


Cor V
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I have no idea how it will react on high moisture, but a polyester as what I use has not so much effect I think.
And the new cutter can do thicker materials, maybe also thin plastic.
For that part it's try and error.

Cor

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You can use lacquer to impregnate cardboard.
When I was a boy I built a whole boat model that way and it withstood all the tests and trials in real water I carried out with it.
Small parts can be impregnated and stiffened by super glue - my window frames are all treated with it.


Herb Kephart
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Helmut--

There are times when the old ways still work well, and this is one of them.
I would rather work with card -- multiple ply Strathmore© available in art supply stores -- than most other materials.
But I have used old cereal boxes, when nothing else was available.
It is my material of choice for structures.

Bill Clouser (a name familiar to modelers in the 50's and 60's) built a interurban model for the Smithsonian this way.
He was a true craftsman.


Herb


Salada
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Lee,

Use a lacquer as Helmut suggests.
Any solvent based resin where the carrier evaporates leaving an impregnated resin in the cardboard works almost indefinitely in my experience.
I usually use shellac in methyl alcohol,
but there are other more modern but more expensive similar treatments intended as preservative base coats for external joinery.
Many of my 'models' are built of cardboard cereal packets or similar.
If you make a mistake, throw it away & start again.

Helmut,  I've never used superglue for reinforcing small cardboard parts.

Michael


Tony M
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Hi Micheal,

I use a quick drying wood glue, got to watch it and not use too much as the cardboard will go soft.
I mainly use the 1mm thick craft sheet cardboard on my Boeing 737 fuselarges.
First attempt wasn't so crash hot, second one much better.
I built the fuselarges in sections, had trouble lining up the  tail section, next model be  built in one whole fuselarge.

In HO scale 1/87th, can't buy a plastic model in that scale too expensive to cut up.
Make a good train load and the 737's still make their first journey by train.

Have you heard of Sydney Central station ?
I am modelling that building, think it might be too big to build out of cardboard.
You can see it on Google Earth.
The width I am not modelling to scale to big cutting it back will still look great when finished.

Hot weekend coming up in the low 40's.
Be drawing my second station building modelled on the East Perth Terminal where the Indian Pacific ends her journey.

Tony from down under


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Hi all,

As usual when another module meeting comes close, activities start to become frenzy.
During the last four days, working ~ 4hrs. a day.
I replaced one of the 'temporary' (well...) cardboard building mockups on my module,
by a more substantial model made with the help of a Silhouette Curio.
I used the CAD files for the mockups, and detailed them where I had better ideas.
P.S.
I liked the roof of the unloader so much that I cannot resist posting a photo of it, too.


Attachment: Silo_fertig.jpg (Downloaded 75 times)

Helmut
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A view of the roof.


Attachment: Anbau_2.jpg (Downloaded 51 times)

Tony M
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Love the building you scratch built using a cad program.
I am modelling Sydney Central station building and it have a lot of the larger fancy bricks.
I know a bloke that scratch built SC in N scale brick by brick, took him 7 years.
I am building SC in HO scale cut back version.

Warming up in Germany, I have family connections from Germany.

Tony from Down under


oztrainz
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Hi Helmut.

Keep the attachments coming.
More photos please.
That is a superb replacement, and the your roof is exquisite.:2t: 

Now I know that you used the Curio for the shingles.
Were they laid individually or as so many rows of shingles as a sheet?
What material did you uses as the raw feed for your Curio?

I'm curious  :)


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@oz

You can use both the Portrait and the Curio for the job.
The shed I showed earlier in this thread was completely cut on the Portrait.
A single row of shingles consists of light or dark grey 160g/m² colour paper.
I composed that in Silhouette's program, going up to a .01mm resolution in order to get the right angle for the edges.


Attachment: Schindelreihe.jpg (Downloaded 35 times)

Si.
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Hi Helmut.


I presume that you are using Windows-10 ?

An update by Microsoft to Windows-10 around 1st January 2017 has been an issue.

Try this ...



- - - - - - -



Go to your Freerails Gallery

In your Gallery window click on the photo you want to Post

The photo will then be enlarged on your screen

Now ... Right-Click ... a drop down menu will appear

From this drop down menu ... click on 'COPY IMAGE'


Now ... go to the Freerails Reply Window open in another tab

Place your cursor where you want your photo to appear

Then you need to Right-Click again ... another drop down menu will appear

From this drop down menu ... click on 'PASTE IMAGE'


The photo you want to Post from your Gallery should now be in the Reply Window.

Simply repeat the above sequence to add more photos to your Post



- - - - - - -



It seems that an update by Microsoft to Windows-10 ...

... has meant that the previous method of clicking on a Thumbnail ...

... having pressed the 'G' button in the Reply Window ...

... is no longer possible for Windows-10 users.



Si.

Helmut
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Testing Si's advice:





Now, that's the workaround for the 'improvements' Microsoft has put into WIN10.
I used WIN7 until a few days ago, and the problem doesn't exist there.


BTW- what you see is the ramp surface, made of 40cm² tiles ( a common size here in Germany ), scaled to TT dimensions of 3.33mm²


@Si: :bow: :bow:


Tony M
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Hi Helmut and Si.

That shingles you are talking about is it the same as slate rock the British use for roofing ?
Nice indeed what you have achieved can you print larger bricks.
On our roofing we have roof tiles, the roof framing has to be built to take the weight.

Nice work on the  walk way, what is the building you are modelling used for ?

How was your Easter head to the coast for the four days.
I spent a couple of days working on the layout getting closer to the big day.
Pics to follow after todays effort.

Tony from down under.


Si.
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Hi Helmut :wave:



Thanks, I'm pleased it worked.



I started a new Thread about this, in the 'Photo Posting' Forum.

Hopefully the Members with this 'Windows-10' issue, will see it there & use the fix.



NICE paper-cutting BTW !



:moose:



Si.


Tony M
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Hi Helmut.

Bingo !
What Si. just said does work and you now can post more than one photo.
Go to the new thread in Photo posting.

I did a test run hands up to Si.  :2t:

Keep the great work up.
What scale are you modelling ?

Tony from down under


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@Tony M

The building is a grain elevator in TT ( 1:120 ) scale.

Re tiles - the plain concrete tiles are easy to model.
To scribe and cut, the Curio has two toolheads that can be assigned to different line colours.
So you can use a scribing tool where there must be seams  etc., and the cutter to cut out the whole array.
Clay tiles are sometimes different, fishscale is easy, but grooved pantiles need strings of yarn glued in parallel on the roof-face first,
and cutouts in thin paper that adapt to the contour.

Large bricks are no problem with the abilities of the software that comes with each Silhouette model.


Kitbash0n30
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Salada wrote:
Use a lacquer as Helmut suggests.
Any solvent based resin where the carrier evaporates leaving an impregnated resin in the cardboard works almost indefinitely in my experience.
I usually use shellac in methyl alcohol


For me, lacquer causes far less paper warping than shellac does.
I use Minwax clear brushing lacquer, usually gloss since it seems to give a harder finish and makes it easier to see coverage.
For shellac it is Zinsser clear.
Both in quart cans.

I know from the 1:1 scale wooden boat crowd,
that dry shellac resin flakes can be bought in bulk and mixed to desired thickness from watery to pasty.


Tony M
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Hi Helmut.

Grain elevator makes a very nice scene indeed and lots of shunting fun.
I have set of plans for a HO scale of a modern grain elevator.
Will have a go in building it, they are constructed out of concrete, easier to model.

Tony from down under.


Cor V
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Why stick to paper ?

With the curio you can cut styrene.

These parts are 0.5mm

Works for me.








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Helmut

Getting ready to tend to seriously ill wife, who is coming home from hospital, so I have fallen behind with FreeRails-

Is the wall brick a commercial product?
I don't see how I could make something like that (different height [of protrusion] bricks) with my Curio.

Herb


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@Herb

That brickwork is "Faller" # 222559   ( intended for N scale, but actually just right for TT )

Brickwork - you can make it by gouging Bristol-Board like I did below.
The dimensions are exact for TT scale -2.1 x 0.9 mm and a 0.1 mm mortar layer.
But this is only for rather small detailed areas IMHO.
Honestly, the plotter wouldn't mind- it just takes some time to finish.
That particular specimen was made on a Portrait.
I used it to simulate old, partially crumbling work.
The three-dimensional surface comes out when you rub off the fuzz left from gouging with an abrasive sponge.





Si.
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Hi Helmut  :wave:



How's the paper cutting & building going ?





Nice structure !



:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:



Si.


Helmut
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Another structure is in the line -but that 9.5" garden RR is taking all my time at the moment.
I have to pour concrete foundations for a segment- turntable plus shed.
Then there's the passenger car waiting to be built, those FX4's need attention, and of course, the daily chores.
Have to include the nights as 24 hrs per day seemingly don't suffice.



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