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Modeling 'The Gilpin Tram' - pt.II
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 Posted: Thu Jun 14th, 2018 02:58 pm
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Keith Pashina
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Monte,


I built my static grass applicator, called a "Grassinator"from a post on the Z-Trains site in 2008. I can tell it's a good one, because I periodically give myself a nice little shock when I accidentally ground to myself.

I think the key to using one is keeping the area you're applying grass to very wet, so there is good conductivity everywhere. I just use the same isopropyl alcohol I use on all scenery applications, and there is enough water in it (especially if I use the 77% stuff) to keep good electrical conductivity.

This is particularly important if you're covering sparse and spotty areas.

When you're in town for the NNGC, I can show you my setup for it.

Keith

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 Posted: Thu Jun 14th, 2018 11:52 pm
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Ken C
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Kieth

Interesting name for the Blacksmith's shop.
The Canadian Pacific had a station named after John L. Retallack in British Columbia on their Kaslo Subdivision.




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Ken Clark
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real men don't use instructions. they are only
the manufacturers opinion on how to put the thing together!
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 Posted: Mon Jun 18th, 2018 02:23 am
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James C.
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Kickin' around Central City, Blackhawk and Nevadaville 1956.

Hadn't posted in a while but it being Fathers day I was looking at a few of my Dad Weldon's slides that I had scanned.
I found some that I had not posted of the area.
I have some more that I will post.

These were taken in 1956.

Happy Father's Day 
Jim








A couple of your Dads photos, from your 'Gallery Page' Jim.



To Post more

Go to your 'Gallery Page'

Click on a photo to enlarge it

Then Right-Click & ... COPY IMAGE

Then in a second tab

Place the cursor & ... PASTE IMAGE ... into your 'Main Reply Window' where you want it to appear



I checked the 1956 photos & they are all OK to Post



:)



Si.


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 Posted: Mon Jun 18th, 2018 07:21 pm
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Keith Pashina
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James, 

Thank you for posting more photos from your collection,
there was a lot more standing around the Pozo Shaft near Nevadaville back then.
I wish I could have been there back then!  

Keith


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 Posted: Mon Jun 18th, 2018 07:47 pm
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James C.
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Thanks for the help - Not sure what happened.

I will start tacking them up.

Jim


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 Posted: Mon Jun 18th, 2018 07:50 pm
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James C.
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Central City in 1956.

From my Dad Weldon's collection.

Jim













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 Posted: Mon Jul 2nd, 2018 01:48 am
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Keith Pashina
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Jim,
Thank you for posting the Central City photos - fascinating images you have in your collection.

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 Posted: Mon Jul 2nd, 2018 02:16 am
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Keith Pashina
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Modeling the Chamberlain Sampling Works


My HOn30 Black Hawk model will eventually have several industry spurs, and my master plan is to have 2 stamp mills and a sampling works represented.  These three industries will be able to handle all of the ore traffic on my small layout and give variety to operations.

I played around with several different track plans, seeking the "perfect" track plan. Of course, there is no such thing, only a series of give and take designs, compromising to get something acceptable. My goal was to have an area on the layout designed for switching work - since this was literally the end of the railroad, trains would originate and terminate there and industries would be switched, so there would be a lot of activity to attempt to model in a small space.

With my narrow (18" deep) shelf area for Black Hawk, I decided that many of the major buildings would be represented by building flats and shallow structures against the backdrop. From past layouts, I knew that for easy operations, it would not help to have too many detailed structures in front - they would be tedious to reach over to couple and uncouple cars, and my hands and shirt sleeves would inevitably be breaking off details. 

So, like the Golden Fleece Mill, grocery warehouse, and Clear Creek Supply Co. buildings, the sampling works would be a shallow, truncated structure, yet with a spur to provide the ore unloading spur I needed.

There were two sampling works in Black Hawk - the State Ore Sampler and the Chamberlain Sampling Works. I liked the Chamberlain Sampling Works as the most interesting structure, and, it was served by the real Gilpin Tram. 




The Chamberlain Sampling Works is the low, sprawling building at the left rear of this photo. Photo from the Colorado Historical Society. 

I previously provided prototype information about the Chamberlain Sampling Works, beginning with the 237th post of this thread.



This paper template shows the space I had for my model of the Chamberlain Sampling Works. The HOn30 ore spur is on the left, and the 3' gauge C&S spur is on the right. I haven't completed a model of a C&S boxcar yet, so the reefer is setting there for now




This cut-out of the previously shown Colorado Historical Society photo shows the west end of the Chamberlain Sampling Works. This is not all of the works - the east end, where ore was crushed and sampled, and C&S boxcars loaded, is not shown. The red shaded area shows the approximate portion of the Chamberlain Sampling Works that I had space to model


The sampling works is a great subject to model. As discussed in several preceding posts, sampling works received ore loads from almost all of the mines along the Gilpin Tram at one time or another. On a model layout, this means any of the mines I have modeled can ship ore cars to this model. I don't know how long the 2' gauge ore spur was that extended into the sampling works, but on my little model, it is  a whopping two ore cars long.


This is an enlargement of the Colorado Historical Society, and shows the west end of the sampling works. The Gilpin Tram spur into the building is on the sloping ramp, with stone walls (the rails can be seen in the snow on top of the ramp). The big door to the right is for ore wagons to enter the building.

The photo enlargement also shows how the sampling works was a  repurposed building from the former Hill Smelting Works. A partially covered doorway can be seen at the base of the stone wall, where the Gilpin Tram spur enters the building. I am not certain what the end wall is constructed of, but my guess was the lower wall was yellow brick common to the area, with exposed wood beams and columns. I assumed the upper peaked wall was flat sheet metal panels over wood framing. 











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 Posted: Mon Jul 2nd, 2018 02:29 am
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Keith Pashina
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Here is the Chamberlain Sampling Works being mocked up on my HOn30 layout. The styrene wall pieces are merely leaning against one another, as I check the fit and figure out what the next steps should be. This photo also shows how small my model actually is!





Once I decided the styrene walls were "about right", I started to complete the model. The roof was modeled as being of corrugated sheet metal over a wood frame - that is based on my interpretation of photos, and I have no other information to say one way or another. The corrugated roofing is an embossed paper sheet from Wild West Scale Model Builders. I cut this into 8 and 10 foot lengths, then air brush it  and color further with oil based stains. To attach it, I used 3M transfer tape, which holds it securely and will never let go in my lifetime!




One corner of the sampling works may have been an office - there are windows in this corner, and to me, it would make sense an office space would be needed for preparing receipts from incoming ore shipments. I made this crude interior - I used some very old detail parts (some dating to the early 1970s) to rough in an interior that will be hinted at when viewed through the 3 small windows. I lit this up with a small 3.7V LED





The long wall that ran parallel to the C&S spur appeared to me to be of unpainted vertical boards. Again, this my interpretation of photos and with no other information. I made of the walls using Strathmore board ( a dense paper sheet product) that I first cut into strips, airbrushed some gray colors, then stained randomly with oil-based washes. This gives a randomness to the "wood" siding that i like. The Strathmore strips are attached to a styrene sub wall with the 3M transfer tape, then trimmed to fit





Here is the mostly completed wall. The office area is at the two windows at left. The freight doors are a laser-cut product from Rusty Stumps Scale Models. I still need to add the ore loading platform, and another small canopy of the left hand freight door

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 Posted: Mon Jul 2nd, 2018 02:38 am
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Keith Pashina
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Here is the partially completed Chamberlain Sampling Works set onto the layout to check how things fit. On my model, I had to reverse the ore unloading doors - the Gilpin Tram spur enters at the right, at ground level, and the door on the left will be for ore wagon unloading. The roof line is one I found interesting - the mill building style roof had a raised vent along the roofline, that I assume was left over from when the building was a part of the Hill Smelting Works, and they left it in place when converting the building to the sampler.  In the front, you can see the HOn3 track crossing the HOn30 track at two locations. The HOn3 spur is non-operable, and the crossing are dummy, too




As the model building continues, I added a raised ramp leading into the ore unloading door, to be used for horse-drawn wagons. I carved the stone wall out of balsa foam, which is to cut and carve. I painted the "stones" with acrylic paints, as show here




Once the "stones" were painted, I put down some fine sand and other landscaping materials, and glued down with diluted white glue. I printed the signage using my old Alps printer to make the decal - the wording is from a photo in the Denver Public Library - Western History Collection


The Chamberlain Sampling Works is still a work in progress, and I have more doors to build and need to add details and figures. But, I am getting closer to finishing this model.


More to come as I trundle along...


Keith



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