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Modeling the Gilpin Tram Part II
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 Posted: Sat May 13th, 2017 02:09 pm
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Keith Pashina
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MORE SNOWPLOW MUSINGS
Si,
I do not have a better photo than the one you linked to showing the Gilpin Tram's snowplow #2.  In fact, it really doesn't show up in photos anywhere else. I think the structure on top of the plow front was some heavy timber (they must have been braced somehow) to increase the plow front. Otherwise, as you pointed out, it was a pretty short plow and not good for plowing any deep drifts. The curved metal blade intrigued me, too - could it have been a cut-down section of a boiler plate?

I wonder what color the snowplow was? It seems a darker color, so I assume it was painted. Perhaps it was regular railroad red or black, or even Tiffany Reefer green ! ;)
There have been posts on the Modeling the Gilpin Tram Thread, Part 1, where other modelers have posted their snowplow models - Woodie Greene in 1:35n2 and Greg Hiley in Sn2 come to mind, and there may have been more. Those may be idea-starters for your model.
Whatever the snowplow was, it had to have been a huge improvement over the previous equipment - pushing the snow with the flat pilot on the shay locomotive, and hand-shoveling the rest!



Keith


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 Posted: Sat May 13th, 2017 02:17 pm
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James C.
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Have some more to post here from that same trip. Most of what Dad did was Kodachrome- unfortunately some weren't. I have scanned over 20,000 slides and still have another 2000? or so to go. We covered much of the Western United States and Canada. I will get some of my Colorado and Southern section of my layout posted eventually- have a bit of work to get it fixed. We just moved to Virginia in September when I took a pastorate here and haven't worked too much on that area yet. Some portions took it bad- the top of my Argo tunnel loading chutes got smashed and I have to fix the trackwork. I have a section that I added onto the narrow gauge too that I haven't even started yet. I am also putting on a couple of ones of the Argo Tunnel from that same set of slides- not Gilpin but since they drained some of the mines on it- does it count?
Jim C.




Jim C.






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 Posted: Fri May 19th, 2017 03:28 am
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James C.
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Have some more photos of the Gilpin area- these were taken in 1972 but show a little more detail. The camper in a couple of the pictures was Dad and Mom's covered a lot of ground with that thing. I was curious I remember taking a mine tour in Central City this trip as a kid but can not remember much about which mine it was. Any ideas?



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 Posted: Mon May 22nd, 2017 01:30 pm
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elminero67
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Those are great old pics-good thing you had the foresight to photograph some of the buildings back in the day.

Any chance you know the approximate date they started using the corrugated tin in the Blackhawk area?

Last edited on Mon May 22nd, 2017 01:32 pm by elminero67



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 Posted: Mon May 22nd, 2017 07:23 pm
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James C.
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The pics were my dad, Weldon's, work. He was a prolific photographer. So far I have digitized over 20,000 slides and probably have 2-3000 to go.i have photos all over the west. The top one is of my Mom and me- was this a grade for the Gilpin? The one after looks like one of their retaining walls.
Jim C.





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 Posted: Sun Jun 4th, 2017 05:31 pm
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Keith Pashina
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James, thank you again for posting the 1960s photos of the Nevadaville area. The photos are a good study of wood and metal siding weathering. It's also informative to be able to see what the Chain-O-Mines complex looked like 50 years ago, and compare that to the partial ruins still visible today.

CORRUGATED METAL SIDING
In one of the recent posts, Duane asked about when corrugated metal may have been first used in the Gilpin County area. The short answer is - who knows?

Flat sheet metal nailed to wood boards seems to be the preferred siding material on the buildings remaining today, at least the ones that appear to be older, and not 1950s or more recent construction.

This old shed has what looks liked patched or recycled metal siding, and this seems very common to the area
From what I could find, corrugated metal siding was invented in England in the 1820s, and first used in Pennsylvania in the 1830s. But, when did it make its way out to the wild, wild West?  That is where things get murky. I looked at the photos I had from the 1800s of the Gilpin Tram, and so many scenes were photographed with the buildings more in the background, that I had trouble telling if I was looking at flat metal, tarpaper, or something else.  However, there are some things we know.

This photo of the Frontenac Mine would have been taken in the 1890s or early 1900s, so we know the material was in use by that time. The Frontenac mine was added on to over time, so dating the corrugated siding is only a guess

The Quartz Hill (or Egyptian) Mine had corrugated roofing and siding, but again, when was this actually constructed? There is no photographic evidence from 100+ years ago for this building so once again, who knows for sure?


The Gilpin Tram's Quartz Hill depot was built by the early 1900s, and this has corrugated siding. I call this the depot, but this is only a guess - it could have been a mine office for a nearby mine, too. The point is, there is corrugated siding on this building
So what can we conclude from all of this? That once again, there is a segment of Gilpin County for which we know very little, and have to use an educated guess when constructing our models.
I have used a combination of flat metal siding, tarpaper, and corrugated metal on my models, selecting what looks "good" to me, and that works on my layout.

Keith


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 Posted: Thu Jun 8th, 2017 05:40 am
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Michael M
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James-Those are some great photos.

Maybe someone could help with a question.  Somewhere in my searches on the internet I remember finding a photo of a narrow gauge line running down the middle of a small mining town.  I want to say it was the Gilpin, but I'm not positive about that, and of course I can't locate that photo now.  Can anyone help?



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 Posted: Thu Jun 8th, 2017 08:15 am
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Steven B
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Hi Keith,
The corrugated siding question has me confounded too.  I did some research and found similar information to you.  Many buildings in Nevada were built out of corrugated siding too.  But from all the known dates, it looks like most were built in the second wave of discovery, mostly around 1900 (Tonopah and the like).  Dated photos from the earlier era (1870s-1880s) just don't show corrugated material, but there are lots of shingle and tar (paper?) roofs.  Maybe some of these were smaller tin sheets as that were popular for fire protection in California.  
 About the late 1800s as kerosene came in, sometimes the square tins were repurposed (flattened) into siding and roofing/shingles.  But, I just can't find much if any corrugation prior to 1900.  Too bad for us early railroad modelers, corrugation is a neat model feature. But I think it was still too expensive prior to 1890s to be used extensively out west.
I really enjoy this forum, thanks for so much information.



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 Posted: Tue Jun 13th, 2017 05:26 pm
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Steven B
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Hi Keith and all,
This corrugated tin question has bugged me for some time.  I was looking through my Nevada Central (Ferrell) book and saw that in the mid-1880s (after 1882 anyway and before 1893 due to the equipment) the Clifton station appears to have had corrugated sheets on the roof!  This depot was probably built not too long after the road was completed (1880) and I don't suppose that they would have replaced the roof that soon after opening the line.  The engine house also appears to have it as well.  So that puts the use in Nevada 10 years earlier than I could find prior.  That's a nice bit of information for me anyway, just thought I would share.
:us:



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 Posted: Sun Jun 18th, 2017 02:32 pm
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elminero67
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Good points on the tin/sheet metal, now I'm curious to look up the Nevada Central book.



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