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Modeling the Gilpin Tram Part II
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 Posted: Sun Jun 18th, 2017 04:07 pm
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Michael M
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Somewhere I remember reading about freight charges in the 1800s.  For those mining towns without a railroad connection freighting expenses, charges were often by weight, could get rather outrages.  Corrugated tin would probably weigh a lot less than lumber and should have been cheaper to haul.  There are a number of photos where buildings were clad in flat metal, often cut and flattened from discarded metal containers.  In Rhyolite one miner made a house from discarded bottles (whiskey?).

http://www.mikesjournal.com/February%202008/Rhyolite%20Bottle%20House.htm

It would be interesting, and maybe somewhat challenging, to model a bottle house.



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 Posted: Mon Jun 19th, 2017 03:56 am
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Keith Pashina
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Michael,
On June 8, you asked about a photo you had seen of a small mining town with the railroad running through it. I wonder if you were thinking of this photo, taken in Russell Gulch?


Keith

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 Posted: Mon Jun 19th, 2017 04:17 am
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Keith Pashina
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Steven, Michael, and everybody,
There is a whole lot to the subject of metal siding - when, what, where? I suppose there were several differences between the mining districts. Digging out the facts, searching through old photos, books, etc. makes this all a fun endeavor.
So, looking one more time at the question of when did the "modern" corrugated iron siding start being used in the Gilpin County buildings?
CORRUGATED METAL SIDING AND ROOFING - REDUX
After posting my thoughts on corrugated metal siding, I heard from Chris Walker, who among many other railroad-related interests, is a big Gilpin Tram fan. Chris wrote to me:
 
“just reading your current discussion… (and) the big mill (later 50 Gold Mines Mill) was built with corrugated siding…(and) the Eagle Mill.
Over in Idaho Springs, the Plutus smelter had a corrugated roof, that was constructed prior to 1891. As for the intent, I'm thinking the less timber available in the Little Kingdom of Gilpin early on, and fire protection led to the corrugated iron being used all over. However, Leadville and Kokomo were still hanging on with the use of boards late, since the vast forests were nearby.”

 Chris also noted the the Gilpin enginehouse roof was corrugated iron.


This image is from the Denver Public Library, Western History Collection

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/fullbrowser/collection/p15330coll22/id/70100/rv/singleitem/rec/128
Chris Walker is very good at noticing details in photos, and bringing out a lot of detail in them. As an example, from the same photo shown above, this enlargement gives this detail:


The corner of the Gilpin Tram's engine house shows it has corrugated iron roofing.
The engine house was one still when first used in 1888, and the second stall was added in 1890. So, the previous photos seem to show there was corrugated iron siding in use in 1890, and maybe earlier.
So, I asked Chris Walker how he could tell corrugated iron from flat tin siding from tarpaper in the black and white photos?
 Chris replied, “
 “.. I'd say that 1890 seemed to be the earliest that the corrugated iron roofing was used, and the mid-1890's maybe for siding (but not necessarily on all buildings). This was a sort of gradual transition until maybe around the turn of the century then taking off in popularity.
Flat steel roofing had a raised joint but looks like seams of tarpaper, so this is very hard to judge unless a close-up of the edge is visible.  Corrugated iron came in short 8ft-10ft(?) lengths so the patterns are different to seamed metal, since the sheets overlap at one length, as opposed to randomness of the roll.  As for viewing flat tin siding vs. tarpaper cladding: the tarpaper seems to me to have wrinkles to define the difference from flat sheet metal, making it more easy to discern.  However, not all photos are clear enough to distinguish."



This photo shows the Iron City Mill, with the then-Union Pacific trackage in front. This photo is from the Denver Public Library, Western History Collection, 

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/fullbrowser/collection/p15330coll22/id/72762/rv/singleitem/rec/54
And, a closeup of the photo shows this roof edge detail:











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 Posted: Mon Jun 19th, 2017 04:25 am
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Keith Pashina
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Chris Walker noted that the “new” (last) Central City depot was completed in 1899, and replaced a building on the site previously was a metal roofed building. 




 Chris has an extensive post discussing the Central City depot area, on the C&Sng Discussion Forum – it can be found at:
http://c-sng-discussion-forum.41377.n7.nabble.com/Central-City-depot-tp6814p6839.html
And, for more information, this information was also confirmed by Rick Steele, also on the C&Sng Discussion Forum, at:
http://c-sng-discussion-forum.41377.n7.nabble.com/Central-City-depot-tp6814p6864.html
Are you familiar with the C&Sng Discussion Forum? It is a close relative of the C&Sn3 Blog hosted by Darel Leedy (another big Gilpin Tram fan). This site is a must-visit, and has page after page of all things C&S. And, since the C&S also served Black Hawk, there is a fair amount of tram-related material too!  The home page is:
http://coloradosouthern.blogspot.com
 Chris Walker has been a prolific researcher of railroad and mining along Clear Creek. This is quite an accomplishment, considering Chris lives in New Zealand!


Here, Chris Walker and I are exploring the Gunnell Mine dump in 2004. That's the Gold Collar Mine in the background






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 Posted: Mon Jun 19th, 2017 04:35 am
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Keith Pashina
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Chris Walker and I have gone back and forth by email on this topic, and Chris also linked to an un-named Central City Shafthouse with all corrugated cladding  the mid-to late 1890's pictures (this can be dated by the Central City view showing the uncovered Armory Hall trussed roof and what may be an Union Pacific lettered boxcar in train). 
 
This mine building has corrugated iron siding - another image form the Denver Public Library, Western History Collection, at:
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/fullbrowser/collection/p15330coll22/id/78903/rv/singleitem/rec/109
 
And a closeup of the same photo clearly shows the corrugated metal siding 
Chris Walker also points out that the Gregory Mill, (later the 50 Gold Mines mill), was built in 1898, mostly of corrugated iron, with the exception of the offices.
Of course, Gilpin County was not that isolated - neighboring Clear Creek County and Boulder County also had extensive mining operations. Chris Walker went to locate a "target-rich environment"  at Idaho Springs, and has identified a wealth of interesting details. An example - over at Idaho Springs, there the State Ore sampler:
 
This is an image from the Denver Public Library, Western History Collection, and the link to this photo of the  Idaho Springs sampler is here:
http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/fullbrowser/collection/p15330coll22/id/38884/rv/singleitem
 

Chris Walker notes that on the Sanborn fire maps dated 1895,  and this sampler was noted to be sheathed with corrugated iron.


Continuing to delve into the Idaho Springs, Chris Walker goes on to point out that the Jackson mill was roofed with corrugated iron, and this mill was. built 1896. This is a very interesting building, and a link to the Jackson Mill discussion on the C&Sng Discussion Forum is here:
http://c-sng-discussion-forum.41377.n7.nabble.com/Idaho-Springs-Mid-Town-Ore-Processing-Part-3-tp2512.html
More C&Sng Discussion Forum links show the Dewey Bros. Sampling Works building was  roofed with corrugated iron as well, and this building was built prior to the 1895 Sanborn map.  The link to photos of this and discussion are at:

http://c-sng-discussion-forum.41377.n7.nabble.com/Idaho-Springs-Mid-Town-Ore-Processing-Part-1-tp2053.html






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 Posted: Mon Jun 19th, 2017 04:45 am
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Keith Pashina
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This image is also from the Denver Public Library, Western History Collection. The link to the Newhouse Tunnel DPL photo:
http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/fullbrowser/collection/p15330coll21/id/4957/rv/singleitem


Finally, the nemesis of the Gilpin Tram,  the Newhouse Tunnel, was also clad with corrugated iron. This building was started in 1893, and Chris Walker notes that the original small Powerhouse had this material. A link to this building is also found on the C&Sng Discussion Forum, at:
http://c-sng-discussion-forum.41377.n7.nabble.com/Newhouse-Tunnel-Boilerhouse-Growth-And-Demise-tp1534p3111.html
 
Chris Walker also pointed out the Specie Payment mine – although not served by the Gilpin Tram, this was a well-known mine in the Clear Creek County area. The photo of this mine is a good example of rippled tarpaper walls with corrugated roofing of many mines.  
 
Another Western History Collection image, showing the Specie Payment Mine. The link to this photo:

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/fullbrowser/collection/p15330coll22/id/74736/rv/singleitem/rec/357




And, here is a closeup of the same image, showing the "wrinkled" siding - tarpaper


And, a good example of a mine covered with a combination of flat tin sheets, tarpaper, and corrugated iron is the Cook Mine – a prominent producer near Mountain City (between Black Hawk and Central City).
 




Cook Mine, from the Denver Public Library, Western History Collection. Link to photo: 
http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/fullbrowser/collection/p15330coll22/id/39673/rv/singleitem/rec/2
 
So, here has been a more detailed look at cladding of mine buildings in Gilpin County. To recap this discussion, 1890 is about when corrugated iron was used for roofing was used, and by the mid-1890's maybe for siding. This was a sort of gradual transition until maybe around the turn of the century then taking off in popularity. However, there were still many mines with tarpaper, flat tin, wood boards, shingles, or combinations of these materials.
 
Whew! There is a lot to consider here when planning my future building models. And a big thank you to Chris Walker for doing the research to bring us this information!
 
I haven’t forgotten the look at the mills of Black Hawk – it’s just that my real job has been interfering with my hobby again. But, next, I post about the C&S transfer area, ore chutes, and Polar Star Mill. 
Until then,
Keith



We will close with this photo of Black Hawk, looking southward along Clear Creek. At front right is the Eagle Mill - served by the C&S 3' gauge. This is the area we will be visiting next. The link to this Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image is here:

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/fullbrowser/collection/p15330coll21/id/3648/rv/singleitem/rec/1776

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 Posted: Mon Jun 19th, 2017 06:05 am
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Michael M
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Keith,

Thanks for posting that photo of Russell Gulch.  Not the one I was looking for, but it works for me.  I want to model a small (very small) town with track running down 'Main Street'.



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 Posted: Thu Jun 29th, 2017 03:59 am
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Chriss H
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Made quite the score this past week - I found a copy of the Gilpin Ghost on DVD, new in the case, under $11 on eBay, I quietly waited and watched the auction, last second I put in a pretty hefty bid, and nobody else wanted or saw the auction, so it's in my hands now, will be watching it later tonight! :glad:
Looking forward to meeting Keith at the Denver Narrow Gauge Convention coming up in a couple of months, and doing some exploring of Gilpin County area with my camera. It will good to get back to my old hiking grounds after so long, I just hope there is still stuff to see.

Attachment: Gilpin Ghost DVD Cover.jpg (Downloaded 82 times)



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I'm a Colorado mining district afficianado. Planning a layout in HOn3 based on the Gilpin County area.
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 Posted: Thu Jun 29th, 2017 03:01 pm
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Herb Kephart
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Just one thing Keith
THANK YOU!

Herb



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 Posted: Wed Jul 19th, 2017 06:09 pm
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Chriss H
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Just saw this drone 4K video posted on Facebook.

The Gilpin Glory hole mine! Shows how many trailings dumps are still there.

https://youtu.be/GEhc0kmvFiA

Last edited on Wed Jul 19th, 2017 06:11 pm by Chriss H



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