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"The Original" Kittom Lumber Co. PART TWO
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 Posted: Wed Nov 23rd, 2016 05:17 pm
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Doctor G
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oztrainz wrote:
Hi Doc Tom & all,
I found an earlier photo of the O standard-gauge track prior to ballasting but after spraying with Tamiya "Deck Linoleum" spray pack.


Another trick I forgot to mention is to scrape the railhead and inner gauge face of the railhead clean with an old credit card before the paint fully hardens off. The paint peels off easily and can be vacuumed up later.

I hope that this helps give you a better idea of how the Tamiya spray method comes up,


Thank you John. These are some good ideas. Dr. Tom

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 Posted: Sun Dec 11th, 2016 08:45 pm
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Doctor G
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Well this was tedious.
The track is all in and wired and it was time to paint it. In the past, working with a large layout I would go with the basic flat brown from a rattle can. On this mini layout I wanted to do something different and in fact make the track an individual model with character. Therefore the rails were painted with mixtures of gray, Brown, and a reddish-brown. The ties were then individually painted with varying shades of gray and brown. An India ink and alcohol wash was used to bring all the colors together and to highlight shadows. Dry brushing using an off white/tan was then done. The track was carefully cleaned and electrical continuity assured and we got some photos.







Above is "the after shot."



Above is "the before shot."

Let me know what you think. Thanks for looking..Doc Tom



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 Posted: Mon Jan 2nd, 2017 09:03 pm
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Doctor G
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Playing in dirt.

Happy New Year!

For the last couple of weeks I have been working in and playing with dirt. Previous layouts have used large quantities of Woodland Scenics ground foam and ballast. This mini layout is going to be different. I'm using natural materials as much as I can to get the"Backwoods" feel I am after.

So I want out in the backyard dug up some dirt, Twigs and other debris from the mulch pile. While my wife was away I dried out the dirt in the kitchen oven. An interesting aroma was noted. 

The dirt and twigs and debris were attached to the sculptamold under layer using white glue and wet water. The rough sculptamold had considerable"tooth” and held everything in place nicely.



Here are some pictures of the track laid directly in dirt. This is such a low budget backwoods operation that mules and horses graded the line and the ties were placed directly on the dirt roadbed. Not a bit of ballast material was used.







Let me know what you all think.

Doc Tom



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 Posted: Mon Jan 2nd, 2017 10:36 pm
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Helmut
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Hmmm..where did your company find the money for those fancy ties then? Methinks the cost per ton is higher than that of gravel.
Honestly - very fine modelbuilding!



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 Posted: Mon Jan 2nd, 2017 11:06 pm
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Doctor G
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Helmut wrote: Hmmm..where did your company find the money for those fancy ties then? Methinks the cost per ton is higher than that of gravel.
Honestly - very fine modelbuilding!

Thanks Helmut. I thought the Peco ties looked kind of rustic???:shocked::shocked:  Maybe not so much. Anyways the Peco track works well. Perhaps I should bury them a little more in the dirt.:us:
Tom

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 Posted: Sun Jan 8th, 2017 11:45 pm
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Doctor G
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A primitive logging bridge.



My Kittom logging outfit Is a simple low budget logging railroad operation. Established at the turn of the 20th Century the railroad was built with saws, axes , mules , horses and human power.

When confronted with crossing creeks and hollows and gorges the construction crews made use of the materials at hand and their woodworking skills.

Here are a few pictures of prototype primitive logging bridges. When there was no piledriver to construct bents for bridges a large tree was felled and notched to provide a base for the upright parts of a bent.




The beams for the track ties were shaped using froes, adzes and draw knives.







To model this primitive bridge I used natural materials including straight twigs. The twigs were given two flat edges using a #11 Exacto knife very carefully.











The base log was notched like the prototype to accept the upright logs that would become the bent.



I fashioned a cardboard jig to build the bent and the individual parts were affixed and glued together with carpenter’s wood glue.



A log retaining wall was fashioned at the beginning of the bridge



I placed braces and used NBW castings to secure the upright logs in the bents.



Everything fit given the irregular shapes of the twigs in use and the bridge was strong enough to carry the weight of a train.



Thanks for L   KING. Doc Tom


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 Posted: Mon Jan 9th, 2017 12:36 am
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oztrainz
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Very nice work Dr Tom - Definitely worthy of :moose::moose::moose::moose::moose:


L: Now if I can get the cliffs I'm working on to look 1/2 as good :w:



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John Garaty
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 Posted: Mon Jan 9th, 2017 01:10 am
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Doctor G
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oztrainz wrote: Very nice work Dr Tom - Definitely worthy of :moose::moose::moose::moose::moose:


L: Now if I can get the cliffs I'm working on to look 1/2 as good :w:

Thank you John. I will be looking forward to some pics of your cliff and the layout.
Doc Tom

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 Posted: Mon Jan 9th, 2017 05:10 pm
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Reg H
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That definitely catches the flavor.  
Sometimes the old timers would just fill the gully with cribbed logs.  
Around here the smaller logs suitable for bridge construction weren't worth much at the mill so were readily available fodder for filling in the low spots. 
Of course what, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, were called  "pecker poles" are now prime timber.
 Reg



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 Posted: Tue Jan 10th, 2017 02:07 am
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Doctor G
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Reg H wrote: That definitely catches the flavor.  
Sometimes the old timers would just fill the gully with cribbed logs.  
Around here the smaller logs suitable for bridge construction weren't worth much at the mill so were readily available fodder for filling in the low spots. 
Of course what, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, were called  "pecker poles" are now prime timber.
 Reg

Hi Reg,

Back about 20 years ago I used "pecker poles" to build this log crib bridge and fill in a gully on my HO "stick hauler."


Doc Tom

 

 

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