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 Posted: Mon Sep 26th, 2016 08:07 pm
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Salada
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Arm & or handflag signals.

Regards, Michael

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 Posted: Mon Sep 26th, 2016 08:30 pm
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Si.
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Hi Scott

Been thinking about your staging-area.
I don't really like it how it is at the moment.

I think I would only use this 'cassette' concept on really small layouts, where there isn't space for anything else.

If you move cassette-stuff like that, it is SO HARD not to screw-up & derail etc. cars.
Long ones are of course worse than short ones.

Have you any other thoughts about staging ??

I had a couple of ideas.
Gotta do a drawing though, hard to explain otherwise.
Later.

:moose:

Si.

Just put this up from your last Thread, as an overall room-size measure.
.

Attachment: SG-TrackPlan-9-20-16-A.jpg (Downloaded 40 times)



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 Posted: Mon Sep 26th, 2016 08:38 pm
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Scott G
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Si,
You aren't the only one who isn't a fan of the cassette staging. I'm looking into some options of moving the whole thing below the main shelf. I've also spent some time refining the concept, the G&Ds of the layout, and a whole new bench layout.

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 Posted: Mon Sep 26th, 2016 08:42 pm
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Scott G
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Here is the new bench plan along with my Givens & Druthers as I have then decided so far.

This is a link to the Google Doc I will be updating the GDs to:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1SKlLlnS3sfDcGuqSP6vjUgAKLuL4czuqKmjn5rAvJu0/edit?usp=sharing

Attachment: PlanV7.png (Downloaded 38 times)

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 Posted: Mon Sep 26th, 2016 08:45 pm
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Scott G
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and here is the layout of the room with the new bench work.

Attachment: TrainRoom.jpg (Downloaded 38 times)

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 Posted: Mon Sep 26th, 2016 09:02 pm
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oztrainz
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Hi Scott,
in 1919, the crewman giving the hand signals would have been hanging off the side of the leading vehicle of the cut being shoved if there was some distance to be travelled or would have been down on the ground walking alongside the wagons as they were moved. If aboard a wagon, one hand would be hanging on to the wagon, the other arm would be giving the hand signal. If the driver was any good, he would have had one of the others up front watching the crew member on the wagon as well as himself during the shove move.

At night the lantern would be used instead of flags. I don't know if the US ever used changeable coloured lenses on their lanterns like out here. Out here there was a 3-way star on top of the lantern that would rotate a clear, red or green curved glass segment in front of the flame of the lantern. Maybe someone else can chip in here for how the old-time US hand lanterns worked?

Working after dark is a whole different ballgame when it comes to moving stuff on rails.

I don't know when the US outlawed walking along the wagon tops from wagon to wagon to set brakes, but in 1919 you probably had a crew of 5 on a freight train - driver, fireman, head brakeman (for the front part of the train), rear brakeman (for the rear part of the train) and the conductor who ran what got dropped off where and when.

By 1919 all interchange wagons (wagons that were not restricted to home system tracks only) should have been fitted with knuckle type couplers. From memory this change was mandated in the early 1900's prior to World War 1 in the US (1905 or so?). Boxcars and other fright car lengths would have been in the 36' to 40' range. (Ask about this on the MRH forum - there are a couple of guys on there modelling early 1900's type stuff that should be able to give you more definitive answers) The USRA (US Railroad Administration) set up during World War 1 standardised the design and construction for a lot of wagon and locomotive designs. This stuff would have been "brand new" in 1919, with minimal wear.

As an agricultural line, your line could have boxcars/iced reefers/flat cars (delivering farm machinery etc) turn up from just about anywhere in the US.

More thinking fodder for you,



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 Posted: Mon Sep 26th, 2016 09:22 pm
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Scott G
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Good info John, I've only begun to scratch the surface of the historical study I want to do, it's yet another whole aspect of this amazing hobby.

I plan to have an ice house in Lancaster at least maybe the other towns too. Icing the reefers would be a nice time consuming job for someone!

It's good to know the car lengths on the freight, any idea on PAX car lengths back then. I plan to do some research on that as time allows.

It didn't really occur to me but there would likely be a lot of produce being loaded onto the trains at all these locations.

Would these cars be loaded at the station or on the siding? Like I said I'm starting pretty much from scratch on my RR knowledge, but enjoying every new discovery.

I did read that Lancaster was the 2nd largest stockyards in at least the US if not the world for many years second only to the yards in Chicago. I really could have stockyards somewhere there. The trains came from Chicago and then they were rested and sorted here in Lancaster bound to the meat markets of New York, Philly and pretty much most of the US North East. Really the only thing keeping me from adding it is the history of gross cruelty that happened at the yard. I'm not sure that's a good enough reason to not have one on the layout.

Love everyone's input keep em coming! Thanks - Scott

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 Posted: Mon Sep 26th, 2016 10:00 pm
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Chriss H
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Hey Scott are you a member of Trainmasters.tv? If so you might want to check out the Joe Fugate Siskiyou line videos on track planning, I have learned a great deal from watching these. Particularly Design Intro and the Track Planning episodes. He discusses using CAD program (or any graphic application really) then using "blobs" to figure out aisle and benchwork widths, very informative way of doing things.

Scott, if you are not a member drop me a PM and I'll see if I can get you a copy on the sly of the part I'm talking about. I think TMTV is well worth signing up though, it's a great value.



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I'm a Colorado mining district afficianado. Planning a layout in HOn3 based on the Gilpin County area.
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 Posted: Mon Sep 26th, 2016 10:03 pm
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Scott G
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Chriss, not familiar with Trainmasters.tv I have the video plus membership over at http://mrv.trains.com/ a good deal of useful stuff on there. What does the http://mrv.trains.com/ cost a month?

Scott

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 Posted: Mon Sep 26th, 2016 10:13 pm
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Chriss H
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PM Sent.

http://www.Trainmasters.tv is a good start to see what's there, it's part of Model Rail Hobbyist magazine, run by Joe Fugate and Barry Silverthorn. Excellent video production for their latest video segments, they use HD cameras with professional set designs and great graphics. I find I use it as much as I use my Adobe Cloud account. Great cheap entertainment and learning.



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Chriss

I'm a Colorado mining district afficianado. Planning a layout in HOn3 based on the Gilpin County area.
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