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The Crown Peak Logging Co.
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 Posted: Fri Dec 2nd, 2016 11:04 pm
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Si.
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Hi James & Reg.

The point I'm trying to make is, not whether this or that company had big or small water towers, how many locomotives they had, or any other 'logical' argument for or against the huge water capacity.

The point I'm making is that often larger than needed structures are made, which later prove to be troublesome.

For example, do you actually want a large structure dominating the scene it is placed in.
Or can it be reasonably made smaller & thus make the 'scene' look bigger.

If a water tower for example is 25% of the depth of eg. a sawmill on a 20" shelf layout, it could well mean that the sawmill ends up looking way less impressive as a result.
A smaller water tower now, may well mean a more impressive looking sawmill later.

Logical arguments & specific prototypes are not at all what I am getting at.
My point is entirely an 'aesthetic' one, about the proportions of one thing to another & how they are intrinsicaly related.
A scale human figure really helps with this.

Having said that, you may well want an extra large water tank.
I would say though, it is pretty unusual to see such a huge tank modeled on a narrow gauge shelf layout.

You have to ask the question, why ?

:moose:

Si.

I'll shut up now...
...and wait for the flood of huge water towers on layouts photos to roll in. ;)



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 Posted: Sun Dec 4th, 2016 11:23 pm
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jtrain
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Thanks Si, I see what you mean now.

Trust me, the difference between the size of the sawmill, or any structure, and this water tower won't be a problem.  I intend for the water tower to in it's own little scene, perhaps even on it's own module.

--James



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James W.

See progress on the Crown Peak Logging Railroad

http://apartmentrailroad.blogspot.com

And:

http://rapidcityrr.blogspot.com

A blog with modeling ideas and prototype information about my favorite regional railroad, the Rapid City Pie
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 Posted: Sun Dec 11th, 2016 05:29 am
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jtrain
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More stuff to come, but tonight I got the 4-4-0 broken in, running nicely on DCC, and programed with a new address.

More on the water tower later.

--James



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James W.

See progress on the Crown Peak Logging Railroad

http://apartmentrailroad.blogspot.com

And:

http://rapidcityrr.blogspot.com

A blog with modeling ideas and prototype information about my favorite regional railroad, the Rapid City Pie
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 Posted: Sun Dec 11th, 2016 10:08 pm
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Reg H
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jtrain wrote: Thanks Si, I see what you mean now.

Trust me, the difference between the size of the sawmill, or any structure, and this water tower won't be a problem.  I intend for the water tower to in it's own little scene, perhaps even on it's own module.

--James


Me too.
:)
Reg



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 Posted: Wed Dec 14th, 2016 02:11 am
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Herb Kephart
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Doesn't the size of the water lumps have anything to do with it?
Is it hard or soft water? Hard water lumps are much more difficult to compress into a small tank.

Hopeless Herb



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 Posted: Sun Jan 22nd, 2017 06:00 pm
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jtrain
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Moving on from the water tower, I decided to try my hand at scratch building rolling stock this weekend.  So far I have one car built, but now I can make several more.  All materials have come from Michaels crafts here in town.

This flat car is based on plans for a Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad pulpwood car found on page 37 of the March/April Issue of the Narrow Gauge and Shortline Gazette.  These plans were drawn up by Jim Dunlop.

Pulpwood cars would be fun in the future, but I think for a railroad soon to be under construction, some flat cars would be more useful.

Here's the post:

http://westernloggingrr.blogspot.com/2017/01/the-first-rolling-stock.html

And the photos of the completed flat car:







The materials are 3/16ths by 3/16ths inch balsa for the beams with a 3/16ths by 1/4ths basswood stock for the ends and a center beam for mounting trucks and couplers.  The deck is made from 1/16ths by 1/4ths balsa.

The nails on the deck and car end is actually made of headpin wire, which is iron, that was stuck into the deck and then cut with a micro flush cutters.  headpins are used in beading to make pendants and such for necklaces.  The top of the headpin has a nail head which works great to represent larger bolts or nails.  The steps are made from the same material as it is quite stiff and will eventually rust, adding to the weathered look.  The queenposts are represented by beading crimps which have a U shape to them, and the wire struts are lengths of brass 26 gauge wire, which is very flexible but can still hold it's shape.

Of course, all these things are for sale on the net as O scale detail parts, but unless I'm trying to model something right down to the rivets, I think I'm quite content with having these details represented by stuff you can buy at the local craft shop.  I've got enough hardware to do a small fleet, so at this point I'm just limited by the amount of wood I have lying around.

--James



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James W.

See progress on the Crown Peak Logging Railroad

http://apartmentrailroad.blogspot.com

And:

http://rapidcityrr.blogspot.com

A blog with modeling ideas and prototype information about my favorite regional railroad, the Rapid City Pie
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 Posted: Mon Jan 23rd, 2017 05:51 pm
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Reg H
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Si:
I am not placing any money on your shutting up....   :)  
But now I see your point.  And realize that we all do it.  If we attempted to duplicate real scenes in scale we would all need huge warehouses to house our layouts.
Reg



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 Posted: Sun Feb 12th, 2017 08:18 pm
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jtrain
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Just a quick update:

I've got an order coming in from Tichy Train Group.  Soon I'll have enough trucks and wheels to do 10 cars, plus I ordered brake wheels and a jib crane for a work car/caboose.

Pretty good to be able to make cars for less than $10 each!

Now I just need to find a way to add weight to the flat cars because they are only about 1 ounce, probably about 2 ounces with metal wheels.  Fine for going forward but I suspect they'll be jumping the track if I ever have to back them up.

--James



____________________
James W.

See progress on the Crown Peak Logging Railroad

http://apartmentrailroad.blogspot.com

And:

http://rapidcityrr.blogspot.com

A blog with modeling ideas and prototype information about my favorite regional railroad, the Rapid City Pie
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 Posted: Tue Jun 20th, 2017 02:18 am
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jtrain
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Haven't given up yet on the Crown Peak Logging Company, but as always, life has gotten busy.
Currently I'm in the process of revising my previous plans to better suit my new apartment. Finally, after several years of waiting, I've got enough space to have a layout up permanently.  That means that I'm no longer too concerned about making the layout fit in a closet when disassembled.  It probably could have worked, but now I've got more flexibility.
I won't be going with RC control (I think I was on the fence about that, I completely forget), after playing around with sound HO scale locomotives on the club layout I'm completely hooked.  Yes, you can have batteries and RC control along with sound, but a small layout with good track should still be quite reliable.
And after thinking it over for a long while, a small layout means that this will be a small logging operation.  Most of the logging railroads in the area were very short, and very little, if anything remains of their presence in the valleys.  So my flatcars from previous posts and the water tower just won't fit.  I need short cars or logging disconnects, a really small steam mill (still wanting it to move via some ideas from Oz) and to backdate the 4-4-0.  4-4-0's, being one of the oldest designs in steam history, should be easy enough to make wooden parts, dome stacks and a lighter lumber load for the tender (the lumber load that came with the engine weights half a pound and drags the draw bar pull of the locomotive down drastically)
My goal is to model the logging "yard" which consists of a couple of sidings for storing log cars, an unloading/loading track for the mill, and a service siding for maintaining the engine and storing spare parts, trucks, wheels.  Entrance and exit of the yard will be done via a cassette track after I was inspired by the writing of Iain Rice.  Finally, the layout will have the option to expand.  This railroad will never get very big, but it would be nice to one day have a long run into the woods.
I've got an area that's about 10 by 8 foot and this layout will fit along two walls of this room.  Such an area is great because no matter where I move to, this layout can fit into the corner of an apartment or a spare bedroom without much trouble.
Great things to come, just got to get few the next few weeks before I can think about this railroad again.
Thanks!
--James
P.S.  I've consolidated two of my blogs.  The "Apartment Railroad" will now be my main blog, including the Crown Peak Logging Company layout and it's updates.



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James W.

See progress on the Crown Peak Logging Railroad

http://apartmentrailroad.blogspot.com

And:

http://rapidcityrr.blogspot.com

A blog with modeling ideas and prototype information about my favorite regional railroad, the Rapid City Pie
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 Posted: Tue Jun 20th, 2017 03:52 pm
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Reg H
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That sounds like a good plan.  I like small layouts.  A couple of times in my life I have started larger layouts only to end up getting discouraged and giving up.
My current layout is pretty small (by 1/4" scale standards) and is very simple and it is STILL not progressing as fast as I would like.
Reg



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