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Humboldt & Toiyabe Railway 1881
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 Posted: Wed Feb 22nd, 2017 02:14 am
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Steven B
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Thanks Doug, I have to say, I am a Luddite and really have problems with this here computer crap.  :bang:   Not my cuppa tea.  I am lucky somedays just to sign on.  Here is a try at this flickr stuff.  I'm not seeing all the neat stuff that you outline.  If this works, then we'll talk about it.  If it doesn't then I'll save it for the one photo posts.  Here goes nuthin'.

33002246846_fb79d51e89_b.jpg
33002324066_b9e9b74e41_b.jpg32228844693_571d0c0144_b.jpg33043916115_afd593cfed_b.jpg



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Steven B.
Humboldt & Toiyabe Rwy
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 Posted: Wed Feb 22nd, 2017 02:16 am
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Steven B
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Ok so that was a bust.  I'll do it the hard way later.  grrrr:f:



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Steven B.
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 Posted: Wed Feb 22nd, 2017 05:39 am
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Nice Guy Eddie
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Hi Steven


The 'sideways' picture attachment is actually fine

Sometimes 'smart' phone type cameras dont know which way up they are

So images can appear sideways

You often see it online since 'smart' phones were invented


I'm sticking with my DynaTAC !


:f:


Eddie



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 Posted: Wed Feb 22nd, 2017 07:04 am
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W C Greene
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I wish that I knew or help out with posting photos. I use the Freerails gallery here and it works every time, except when MicroS$%%T "updates" some computer crap that goofs with my program...but I digress. I don't know a thing about smart phones, I phones, pole phones or any other doo dad like that but my po' old laptop gets me to the gallery and if I have the photo(s) on my desktop, it will send them to the gallery, thence to any posts. One click without any http//234567$%^^&.com BS. I encourage all to try the gallery, it beats the hell outta Photobucket and the others.

Woodie-Luddite DeLuxe



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 Posted: Wed Feb 22nd, 2017 09:57 pm
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Steven B
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Well, thank you Woodie, seems that you were one of the few who didn't have an issue with the Gallery gone missing.  I changed my color and now I think that I can do this!

Oh My!  Look it worked!  :glad:
Whatever shall I do?!!!  So, now I can do this the easy way.  :shocked:
So this is my latest project.  I am building a tent saloon for a camp.  Placer gold was being discovered in many places, in what would many call a "late" timeframe.  Most people associate placer or free gold with the California Gold Rush, where miners panned and used water to wash the gold from the sands and gravels of stream beds and ancient rivers.

Nevada was no different.  The Comstock was actually discovered by the Grolsch (think I spelled that right... probably not, I am too lazy to look it up) brothers in 1859, about the same time they were panning Clear Creek in Colorado.  Manhattan, NV was also a large placer operation as was Oseola, NV among others.  My story is this, while the railroad was building up the Toiyabes in 1881, the grade builders unearthed a large sand bar loaded with free gold on Big Creek and a rush began.  While there were mines up in this area, they didn't last long and were most likely prospects, but in my world, the area exploded.

Tent towns were built throughout the "wild west" mining days of Nevada all the way up into the 1920 at Leadfield outside of Death Valley.  Places like Rawhide, Manhattan and others began as tent towns, mostly centered around a few merchants and of course as many saloons as could be mustered.   You can search UNR archives on line and many tents pop up, and many tent saloons are the subject matter.

The Star Spangled Banner is a hat tip to some friends of mine from back in my historic interpretive days.  But, in the photos that I found, there were many saloons and businesses that just painted their signs right on the canvas.
I was sitting in a pizza restaurant one night during the time that I was envisioning this project and we were given napkins by the waitress, and BAM! these were perfect for O Scale heavy canvas :thumb:, so I asked for a couple of more... she obliged.  I left a big tip!  I commenced to build the floor and framework out of styrene, distressing it and using a myriad of acrylic colors to make the "wood" feel like wood.  I cut and wrapped my new found canvas on the structure and painted it a thinned "sand".  I use thread for the ropes and gave the whole thing a wash of very thinned black.  

It is the Star Spangled Banner, so my story is Antone is the owner and keep, came 'round the horn in '50 to try his luck in the mines.  He struck out as a miner, but was able to get a job at a restaurant in Sacramento.  He quickly became the head cook, and there was a rumor, which he refuses to confirm or deny that he used to work in DelMonico's.  Never-the-Less, he was successful enough to open his own restaurant and made a small pile.  His partner, Carson, tried to talk him into going to San Francisco, this was about the time of the Washoe excitement, and he opted for adventure instead.  Packed up his pots and pans, and his beloved bar and back bar (also shipped 'round the horn in '57) and headed off.  

Washoe was just what he wanted and just about the time things got routine, he lit out for White Pine and ran a place on Treasure Hill.  When that petered out he headed to Austin and worked there for a time, always restless.  Then... Big Creek just over yonder, exploded, being so close, he was about the first on scene.  The SSB is his latest.  Always loving the American dream and being able to be as successful as he was willing to work, he fostered a deep love of American History and has collected a number of prints of historical note.  One, his favorite, being the copy of Washington Crossing the Delaware by Emanuel Leutze (1851), the second is one of General Grant (before all the messiness of President Grant). He also has collected some copies of some "traditional" saloon art for his patrons who demand it.  You will notice that President Garfield is dropped in black crepe.  It is late September, and he has just been assassinated.  Antone is deep mourning, he liked Garfield's policies and doesn't feel that Chester Arthur is up to the task.  "We shall see," he says.

Here we are at the beginning of this project.  Antone has plans to build an addition for cooking food.  Right now he is serving up pork, beans and biscuits as that is all he has time to cook with building the establishment.
More to come!  Thanks Woodie for getting me into the Gallery.  It was a tough find!:cool:

Last edited on Mon Feb 27th, 2017 10:37 pm by Steven B



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Steven B.
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 Posted: Wed Feb 22nd, 2017 10:22 pm
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Steven B
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First the bar.  The bar is a little more elegant than many pictured in tent saloons.  I built it piece by piece basing it loosely on one that I used to sling beers on in Columbia, California. While many bars did not have a brass foot rail, this came "'round the Horn."

This is the bar I scratch built it from Evergreen.  I found it easy to bend the thin parts.  I would glue one side, let it dry and then glue it to the other side, like a veneer and then over laid it with trim.  I did the rail the same way.


You can see the construction on the bottom that I did not paint.


I built it to detail the back, but I am not sure that I will do that, nobody will be able to see it... not even a little bit.



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Steven B.
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 Posted: Wed Feb 22nd, 2017 10:35 pm
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Steven B
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The back bar I wanted to be ornate.  I had a couple of greco-roman columns from my HO days that have been languishing in a parts box.  There was this very nice back bar in Sonora, California that I thought might be black walnut.  It was DARK.  And... it had two columns.  There you go...



The base was two el cheapo parts from 1/48 dollhouse set.  I think they were supposed to be side boards. I filed one side of each and glued them together.  Bammo, now I needed a mirror.  I liked Doug's mirror in his barbershop so I ordered up some "BareMetal" Chrome and cut it to fit, finished out the top and there you have it, a back bar.  I added a beer barrel with a tap.  
Keep in mind this is "steam" beer.  Your history lesson - Steam beer is a western tradition.  and is basically a lager style of beer, that is brewed and stored in "warm" conditions.  "Lager" means "to store."  Lagers were stored in cool to cold places in the east and Germany.  This was a challenge in the west.  So it was brewed like a lager but was much more excitable because of the temperature.  There is no real reason that can be found as to why it was called "steam beer" except that it developed a better head due to the temperature situation.  It had a pressure like steam.  When tapped the tap was driven into the keg with a hammer.  For the uninitiated who stayed at the bar, they could get a dousing of suds.  Lo the bar keep who missed!  Steam Beer was killed by the 18th Amendment.  Today there is only one "Steam Beer" as the name was trademarked by a San Francisco brewer.  However!  We brewed a "western" beer on numerous occasions.  It was bottled and lacked the excitement of a wooden keg.



Antone, loves his bar and back bar.


More later as I progress.  Thanks for looking!



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Steven B.
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 Posted: Thu Feb 23rd, 2017 12:49 am
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slateworks
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Good stuff Steven. Now you want lots of bright coloured liquor bottles to go with the barrel. I see the bar-keep's already found one.



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 Posted: Thu Feb 23rd, 2017 12:53 am
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W C Greene
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Very nice! That's a real saloon you are building.

Woodie



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 Posted: Thu Feb 23rd, 2017 01:03 am
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pipopak
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Don't forget the shotgun under the counter...
Jose.



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