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3D Printing - Making a master for HO moulding
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 Posted: Fri Feb 24th, 2017 10:19 pm
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Tony M
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Morning Paul, yes the photo of the door is meant to give the height  of the pedestal, the door height in HO scale is 25mm high the pedestal takes up a third of the door if you  look closer on the right of the door pic you se a steel bracket that is the height of  the pedestal.
I have a better pic of the pedestal and the door, but has my friend in it so will send you a PM of that pic .
Morning are cooling down now get some work done on the layout, I don't think I be able to turn then with my wood lathe those pedestals being so small, 10mm high
My friend he had his made out of brass edging to look like a round pedestal being N scale you wouldn't notice that, some people that model proto types to full detail probable notice it.
Tony

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 Posted: Sat Feb 25th, 2017 01:15 am
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Paul W
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Oh how I wish it would cool down here!  I know the high 20's is certainly nothing amazing to Australians, but it's always a matter of what you are acclimatised to, and I'm definitely not acclimatised to 28 degrees and 80% humidity!

I really enjoyed my visit to Brisbane and Sunshine Coast back in June 2000, 18 degrees first thing in the morning, absolute heaven!  My family were wearing shorts and tee shirts all day....one shopkeeper, who was wearing long pants and a thick polar fleece jacket raised an eyebrow and said 'You must be Kiwi's, eh?'  Not difficult to spot us among the local populace, who were all dressed just like what we had been wearing before getting on the plane back in Auckland!

Paul Woods

Whangarei, NZ.

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 Posted: Sat Feb 25th, 2017 01:21 pm
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Tony M
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Hi Paul, which island are you on must be the north from what you are saying about your weather guess you would think your summer is like ours, humidity is fun at all doesn't take long to have a wet shirt even working on the layout .
I
t is cooling down pretty quick now they say we are having 28 degrees on Monday and would you believe it storms predicted, get some work don on the front station modules nearly completed, how is your layout going .

Back to the weather I would believe what you said about you loving in when you were visiting the Sunshine  coast in June and you had summer shorts and tea shirts in 18 degrees.

Tony

Last edited on Sat Feb 25th, 2017 01:21 pm by Tony M

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 Posted: Sun Feb 26th, 2017 01:53 am
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Paul W
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Hi Tony

Yes, I live in the Far North of the Nth Is., roughly 20 minutes drive south and inland a bit from Whangarei.  We only get a handful of frosts every winter, and they are usually quite mild, only one or two degrees below.

Regarding my layout, I set out to build a shelf around my approx. 6m-square workshop, mainly just to have something to test rolling stock on.  Recently I decided that my construction method didn't allow enough height for 'vertical' scenery, that is, land contours going much below rail height so I am - or was - in the process of removing the shelves screwed to the walls, to be replaced with brackets lower down, supporting portable layout sections.  This will allow me to work on the sections at a more convenient height, on my workbench.

Unfortunately, my leaky mitral heart valve, which was discovered by accident two years ago, gradually worsened to the point where at the start of this year I needed open-heart surgery to fix it - I thank my lucky stars that I got a repair and not a replacement, thus avoiding the need to take blood-thinning drugs for the rest of my life.  It has been five weeks since the surgery, so I have seven weeks left to go before I am allowed to lift more than 1kg in each hand, due to this massive scar down the centre of my chest :f:  As if I didn't already have enough problems with my back and neck - got dinged up in a car accident 20 years ago and had chronic pain ever since.

To make life easier for myself, I have designed a super-light layout section built up from strips of 3mm ply, stiffened with pine strips 10x10mm glued along their edges, with the whole lot joined by plywood brackets.  There is not one screw or nail anywhere; it is all glued.  I made up a jig to assemble them, attached here for your viewing pleasure:

By the way, it is assembled up-side down.  The blocks to the rear in this photo are pairs of tapered wedges, one glued to the jig and one free.  When the baseboard is complete and glue has set, all you have to do is pull the wedges out and the baseboard comes free.


Attachment: 000_0004 - Copy.JPG (Downloaded 39 times)

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 Posted: Sun Feb 26th, 2017 02:14 am
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Paul W
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And here is the completed baseboard....it is assembled up-side down so that the top is perfectly flush; two layers of 50mm polystyrene foam will go on top of this, then 12mm ply trackbed, 3mm foam as a noise deadener, 3mm ply and finally the sleepers and rail on top of that.  The tapered ends allow identical sections to be butted together either alternately left-right to form a straight line, or all facing the same way to form a curve.


Attachment: 100_0008 - Copy.JPG (Downloaded 39 times)

Last edited on Sun Feb 26th, 2017 02:24 am by Paul W

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 Posted: Sun Feb 26th, 2017 02:23 am
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Paul W
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And a screen-shot of how the system works....maximum radius is 1500mm for this version, but of course you can scale up or down to suit the radius you want.  The curves always have spiral transitions on the ends, which is mainly intended to enable quite long rolling stock to get around the curves without suffering 'tail wag' that can cause derailments, especially when using body-mount couplers as I prefer to do.  It also allows superelevation, although at this point in time I am not planning to do this.

Regards
Paul Woods

Whangarei, NZ.

Attachment: Basement Railway Plans.jpg (Downloaded 39 times)

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 Posted: Sun Feb 26th, 2017 10:48 am
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Tony M
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Hi Paul, guess what I have to start all over again was at transferring the photos over  and the page frooze at least I am ready to go to the second tab now to transfer the photos.
You are carbin copy winter weather to what we had lay year which was a mild winter no jack frost, I think we are going to have a colder winter this year,today started off perfect didn't start getting warm to late afternoon humidity was up high wife and son was nice and cool in the house wasn't too bad in under the pergola managed to paint the third last station module,

Now I have  three  station modules ready to lay down the track, I have a set up wher I am not bending down on knees nailling the track down pics to follow on my layout post.

Wow that is pure awesme the way you have built your modules light and yet very strong build indeed what you want, actually my  last module layout was the same design as your modules but I used 12mm ply with 100mm side frames with two beams very strong could stand on the module.

Do you use a CAD drawing to draw those drawing, I had one but when I got my lap top with win8.i couldn't open it pretty exspensive programme to buy.

I know how you feel when it comes to open heart surgery I had one in 2002 was an aneurysn repair in the asendering aorta they discovered that my heart valve needed replacying had no choice I was well under now have a mechanical valve and yes taking the dam blood thinning tablets for the rest of my life.

Sadly with in two year I have to face the knife again for open heart sergury for another aneurysn repair on the asending aorta but right on the top of the arch and another artery feeding off right where the aneurysn is they have no idea how to tackle this one better work it out soon .

Can you only post one pic per post, I have found a way where I can post more than one pic, here are the two pics of my last layout

I even had working signals and point motor on the points the furtherest away from the control panel, new layout is getting a new panel.



Look at the first pic top the top left hand side you will see the grenn LED signal I had two signals per point letting me know if the point was in the straight or curve
My main issue was the legs and the cost of timber being so dear till I discovered HO scale garden railway not far away finning the first test train.

How is the pedestal drawing going looking forwadr to seeing the outcome
Take care Ton from down under.


Last edited on Sun Feb 26th, 2017 10:50 am by Tony M

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 Posted: Wed Mar 1st, 2017 03:25 am
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dwyaneward
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Paul,

Great work on the lightweight module. What is the intermediated brace spacing.



____________________
Dwyane Ward | Fairview, TX
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Texas & Pacific - Bonham Division in N Scale
http://kdrail.blogspot.com/
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KD Models - 3D printing
https://www.shapeways.com/shops/kdmodels
-----
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 Posted: Wed Mar 1st, 2017 05:34 am
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Robert Comerford
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Tony, I have more than heard of Ross Balderson.
Young Rossie was a very youthful member of the CMRC when I lived in Canberra years ago. Amazing to think how he was very interested in my scratchbuilt N scale NSWGR models; he only had RTR American N at the time. I loaned him some of my stock to help for his first exhibition layout. What a difference a few years makes.
His modelling is world class, wish I had his steady hands and eyesight.
cheers
BobC

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 Posted: Wed Mar 1st, 2017 09:16 am
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Paul W
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Hi Dwayne

Transverse framing is at 200mm spacing.  This might be a bit overkill for supporting 50mm foam layers on top, but I wanted it make sure it wouldn't crack while I was carving the foam, and also have plenty of gluing area between foam and wood.

I've just weighed this section; 1485 grams or 3.27 pounds....might have set a new record!

Regards
Paul Woods

Whangarei, NZ

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