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CHAIN-DRIVE ! - Components & Ideas For Miniature Drive Systems
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 Posted: Wed Apr 5th, 2017 03:08 pm
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Helmut
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Herb Kephart wrote:
AC Macks used #120 chain, 1 1/4" pitch. Pitch is the distance between the pins, just for reference.



It scales out to 0.9mm pitch in 1:35
And that's why all available functional chains are much too coarse for anything smaller than 1:16 scale IMHO. You could try fusee chains, they sell for mere 35 bucks per foot.



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 Posted: Wed Apr 5th, 2017 04:04 pm
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Herb Kephart
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For the nit -pickers. the largest standard roller chain--

ANSI # 240, ISO #48A1,   width-3.760", pitch - 3", roller diameter 1.75". Average strength 141,476  Lbs.   Weight 15.567 Lbs/Ft

This chain is used between the axles of the EBT diesel. Two 300 HP (on a good day) GM diesels, motor only on one axle. Think I took a pix, but it is somewhere on film.

This chain is also made (I think on special order) in double width--

ANSI#240-2, ISO#48A-2,  Width 7.220", all other dimensions the same . Average strength  285,292 pounds.  Weight 30.330 Lbs/Ft

Wen the chain is greasy (and it comes that way, only not as dirty as used) that 15½ Lbs/Ft is more than one man can manage. Sounds like a little, lifts like ten time that.

I'm going to go out on a limb, and say that 240, even the single row,was never used in the woods. That single row chain looks like a lot larger than any photos of critters than I have seen.

In the real world
I have had  to handle a lot of industrial chain., and that 240 between the axles of the EBT loco evoked a OH GAWD from me. Something smaller would be more likely.

OK, you in the back row wake up. School is over.

Herb.




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 Posted: Thu Apr 6th, 2017 04:47 am
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Si.
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Hi Stephen, guys :wave:


Thanks for the photos Stephen.

In some of the photos, the chain seems to be very large.

But this is due to the wide-angle camera lens & the fact that it is nearer to the viewer than the figure.

Looking at Stephens 1st photo, where the chain at the figures feet is on it's side...

...it is easy to see, that in fact, it is in reality really quite slender.


Used on a 1:35 model, where partly under bodywork, & only the thin side is mostly seen...

...the chain looks very acceptable. :)


Bearing in mind that eg. 'logging lash-ups' weren't exactly 'factory economy jobs'...

...larger than 'average' chain could easily have been used on such vehicles.

I've seen this chain used in 1:24 scale & it looks very nice 'in context' with the whole model.


In experimenting on the bench, with some of my standard 1:35n2 wheelsets & a vehicle body...

...It certainly looks pretty good to me.

Wide angle camera lenses, 'conceptual' measurement & theory aside...

...this is possibly a nice option for a 'backwoods' buggy in 1:35n2


Although I did look at Fusee chain as my first option...

...since it isn't designed for sprockets really, it is not a great option I don't think.

I did actually find another miniature chain today as well.

It is a very small 'true' metal roller-chain, made of stainless-steel...

...price wise, it is TEN TIMES more £$ than the Delrin(TM) & a few Thou" larger.


The conclusion I've come to...

...is that using the miniature ladder-chain for a 1:35 model would probably look OK.

Certainly there is no operational problem, it works like a dream !


:bg:


Si.



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' Mysterious Moose Mountain ' - 1:35n2 - pt.II
http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=7318&forum_id=17&page=1

' M:R:W Motor Speedway !!! ' - 1:32 Slotcar Racing Layout
http://www.slotforum.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=59295&st=0&a
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 Posted: Thu Apr 6th, 2017 08:29 am
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Si.
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Fusee chain.





:shocked:


Si.



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' Mysterious Moose Mountain ' - 1:35n2 - pt.II
http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=7318&forum_id=17&page=1

' M:R:W Motor Speedway !!! ' - 1:32 Slotcar Racing Layout
http://www.slotforum.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=59295&st=0&a
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 Posted: Thu Apr 6th, 2017 10:58 am
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slateworks
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Fusee chain was my first port of call for the Stunted Goose but when I saw the prices on eBay I backed off from that one!



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 Posted: Fri Apr 7th, 2017 06:56 am
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Helmut
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Irony on:
"It's a pity we don't have those orphanages any more, the source of cheap labour to make them"
Irony off.
Fusee chains are a classic example of items made by child labour, the children being sharp-eyed enough to make such delicate structures.



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 Posted: Fri Apr 7th, 2017 09:56 am
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southpier
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and now

Last edited on Fri Apr 21st, 2017 09:21 am by southpier

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 Posted: Mon Apr 10th, 2017 04:12 am
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chasv
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while rebuilding a mazeriti v 6 and a benz diesel we compaired timing chains they looked identical so we got a couple of the diesel chans and put them in the v6 cheaper than the factory chains and lasted longer



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 Posted: Mon Apr 10th, 2017 11:30 am
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Kitbash0n30
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Fusee chain is new term to me, so went and looked it up.

"The origin of the fusee is not known. Many sources erroneously credit clockmaker Jacob Zech of Prague with inventing it around 1525,[2][3][4] but it actually appeared with the first spring driven clocks in the 15th century.[1][5] The idea probably did not originate with clockmakers, since the earliest known example is in a crossbow windlass shown in a 1405 military manuscript.[1] Drawings from the 15th century by Filippo Brunelleschi[6] and Leonardo da Vinci[7] show fusees. The earliest existing clock with a fusee, also the earliest spring-powered clock, is the Burgunderuhr (Burgundy clock), a chamber clock whose iconography suggests that it was made for Phillipe the Good, Duke of Burgundy about 1430, now in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum[1][5] The earliest definitely dated fusee clock was made by Zech in 1525. The word fusee comes from the French fusée and late Latin fusata, 'spindle full of thread'."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fusee_(horology)



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 Posted: Mon Apr 10th, 2017 01:26 pm
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pipopak
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maybe we should start raiding pawn shops for old non-working watches...

Jose.



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