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The Original 'Kittom Lumber Company' - pt.III
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 Posted: Sun Aug 20th, 2017 05:34 am
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W C Greene
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Howdy Doc, there were plenty of 3 footers hauling large timber: West Side, Mich Cal, etc. and some 30" lines like Molina Lumber. The Sandy River 2 footer also had a logging branch but they didn't haul big sticks like the West Coast lines. What I meant was that the loading gauge for a 24" gauge log car pretty much limited the size of the logs. Of course, as I write this, somebody out there is thinking "he must be crazy, there WERE 2 foot loggers!". Might be a subject for some research but not by me.
As an aside, the Bachmann On30 log cars are very nice and there have been several resin cast On30 cars available over the years also. Now, if somebody like Kadee came out with O scale disconnects with springs and couplers (somebody makes them also?) then maybe I would do some logging again.
I tell you, I would probably rather build 1:35n2 skeletons than the dadgum ore cars that I have built over 20 of...but that's just me.
BTW, I do have a small sawmill on my layout which cuts ties, mine props, and trestle timbers. See, I can't get away from my old ways!

Woodie



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 Posted: Sun Aug 20th, 2017 07:15 am
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Ken C
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  OK
  It is not 2Ft Gauge but 2Ft 6In Alisan Forest Railway. The log cars built by MAGOR were 30 Ft in length, with 6 Ft bunks. Note some cars have only 1 Log loaded

Attachment: IMGP0820.JPG (Downloaded 80 times)



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 Posted: Sun Aug 20th, 2017 03:10 pm
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Steven B
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Here's a whole bunch o' images with big trees, and for eastern pursuits there is a cross section of a stump that is about 6-7' in diameter just down the road from me in VA. 

Hassinger Lumber out of Konnarock, VA had some pretty big logs too.  They shut down in the 1920s, but were standard gauge only because that was what they had from earlier operation, in PA I believe. There was also a narrow gauge railroad that worked out of Damascus, hauling logs out of the same area.  You'll see big logs at the turn of the 19th century, small logs today.  The size logs didn't really determine the gauge, finances did.

http://sierraloggingmuseum.org/logging-history/early-1900s-logging-photos/

Keep up the good work Doc.



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 Posted: Sun Aug 20th, 2017 09:13 pm
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Doctor G
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Ken C wrote:   OK
  It is not 2Ft Gauge but 2Ft 6In Alisan Forest Railway. The log cars built by MAGOR were 30 Ft in length, with 6 Ft bunks. Note some cars have only 1 Log loaded
Thanks for the input. :wave:I should probably reconsider my reluctance about big logs on narrow gauge rr's. Doc TOM

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 Posted: Sun Aug 20th, 2017 09:17 pm
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Doctor G
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Steven B wrote: Here's a whole bunch o' images with big trees, and for eastern pursuits there is a cross section of a stump that is about 6-7' in diameter just down the road from me in VA. 

Hassinger Lumber out of Konnarock, VA had some pretty big logs too.  They shut down in the 1920s, but were standard gauge only because that was what they had from earlier operation, in PA I believe. There was also a narrow gauge railroad that worked out of Damascus, hauling logs out of the same area.  You'll see big logs at the turn of the 19th century, small logs today.  The size logs didn't really determine the gauge, finances did.

http://sierraloggingmuseum.org/logging-history/early-1900s-logging-photos/

Keep up the good work Doc.
Nice pics!! :glad: I think I will tell my local logging buddy that the Kittom Lumber Company is in the BIG stick business now.   I am changing my viewpoint. :bg:  Doc Tom

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 Posted: Mon Aug 21st, 2017 12:24 am
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Doctor G
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After some good discussion with fellow logger Mr Bill Nelson,here in Clarksville, and several good folks online I am learning just what size of logs a narrow gauge RR could haul in 1910. It appears on Eastern Lines up to 6-8 feet in diameter. So I cut up some 3 foot diameter specimens that Bill provided and they load nicely on the little narrow 30" gauge logging car.





The little Porter was even able to pull the load and get it in to the Log Dump area before nightfall.



I am learning a lot about the hardiness of early logging RR equipment and can't wait to cut and load a 6 foot diameter log.

Doc Tom

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 Posted: Tue Sep 5th, 2017 12:43 am
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Doctor G
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There has been more work done on the mini railroad. The Bluffs on the Riverside of the model have been completed with bushes and vines. I will plant more bushes on the "Woods" side of the layout over the next several days and began to apply ground-up leaves and forest floor litter.








Thank you for looking. All comments and critiques welcome. Dr. Tom

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 Posted: Wed Sep 6th, 2017 12:32 am
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Herb Kephart
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If I may make a comment it the interests of more prototypical loading-----OK__OK  I'm gonna nitpick!

Load the two smaller logs, and chain them down, then set the big log in the crotch between the two.The weight of the big one tightens the bejabbers (old Eastern logging term, usually preceded by colorful profanity) out of the chains, and the biggie has a nice "nest" to ride in.

Perfectly--well as perfectly as anything was out in the woods --balanced load.

Herbie



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 Posted: Wed Sep 6th, 2017 05:39 am
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Doctor G
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Herb Kephart wrote: If I may make a comment it the interests of more prototypical loading-----OK__OK  I'm gonna nitpick!

Load the two smaller logs, and chain them down, then set the big log in the crotch between the two.The weight of the big one tightens the bejabbers (old Eastern logging term, usually preceded by colorful profanity) out of the chains, and the biggie has a nice "nest" to ride in.

Perfectly--well as perfectly as anything was out in the woods --balanced load.

Herbie
Good point Herb. That is exactly how the real loggers did it. I see so many logs lashed with the chain around the entire load on model RR's. Not exactly prototypical.

In the future I will be investing in some chains to tie down these toothpicks correctly.

Thanks for the input.:thumb:  Doc Tom

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 Posted: Wed Sep 6th, 2017 10:09 am
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W C Greene
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Yes, Herbert is right about the chains. That is exactly the way it was(and still is) done. This method is used today when logs are loaded on flats or rubber tire log trucks. While I may model mining, much of my library is concerned with logging. And yes, I have built several narrow gauge loggers also.

Woodie



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