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Brian S
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Hello friends,
I am in the process of creating the history of my dream model railroad.  I have decided on modeling Maine narrow gauge in about the year 1920.  The problem so far is that there isn't much of a reason to build a railroad in turn of the century mid-coast Maine.  I have finally set my mind on extending the Maine granite industry out into the early 20th century.  After some research into the subject, it seems like the internet is devoid of anything about old timey granite quarrying.  The only semi-helpful piece of info came from a site vaguely talking about a place called halls quarry up by bar harbor.

Anyway, anybody know of any good sources for historical quarrying information?

W C Greene
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Howdy Brian, the Monson RR was a slate hauler in the "North Woods"of Maine. The little 2 by 6 (2 foot gauge by 6 miles long) operated until 1941 or so, using 0-4-4t locos which are still being operated at the Maine NG Museum. I would imagine that any of the books about the Monson would be helpful and you might inquire at the museum if they have info also.

Good luck, the little Monson is one of my favorite railroads.

Woodie

Brian S
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That's a great idea, thanks for the advice.  My little dream originally started as Maine 2 footer model, but it has slowly morphed away from that.  Never really looked into the Monson much though.

I looked around a bit last night and from what i saw it looks like slate was general hauled in much smaller blocks than granite would be.  But only more research will tell.  Would you happen to know of any good sources that i could use?

Your signatures asked for you day to be made, this should do it.
Part #1
Part #2

darrylhuffman
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Quarries fall roughly into two categories.
1. cut stone blocks
2. gravel
Which kind are you interested in?
Darryl Huffman

Brian S
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darrylhuffman wrote: Quarries fall roughly into two categories.
1. cut stone blocks
2. gravel
Which kind are you interested in?
Darryl Huffman

I am interested in a block quarry.  According to This Link Maine shipped out a fair bit of block Granite in the middle of the 19th century.

darrylhuffman
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Brian,
I have purchased many books on quarries over the past 60 years.
I think the best book for you is called:
Cape Ann Granite
It is part of the Images of America series and is available on Amazon.com
I also suggest going on EBay and searching for:
quarry
you will find lots of photos of quarry operations if you look there frequently.

darrylhuffman
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On one of the episodes of THIS OLD HOUSE on PBS, they visited a rock quarry and took the viewer through each step of production.
Great viewing.  The main thing I got from viewing that program is that they still do it today the same way they did it decades ago.
Sometimes old technology still works great.

Brian S
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Oh wow, that looks perfect.  It's also not to expensive, that helps when you are a college kid!  Thank you for your help.

PS. Good to know about this old house, I love that show.  Guess it's time to go dig through the the archive.

Last edited on Fri Jul 28th, 2017 11:29 pm by Brian S

oztrainz
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Hi Brian,
First, welcome to Freerails.
The Library of Congress site is one you should have a look at especially the HABS/HAER/HALS area see http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/ and type "Granite Quarry" into the Search field - turned up 111 entries for me. :bg:

The higher level picture search for all photographic collections at the Library Of Congress website http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collections/ and the same search terms turned up another 40+ photos. 

Be inventive with your search terms - try granite quarrying, slate quarrying, Maine quarrying, Vermont quarrying, granite loading, granite block, quarry crane, quarry machinery, etc.  

If you get lucky the HAER area might have plans...have a closer look at the entries returned. check out the left-hand panel Photos appear first then, plans, other documents

That ought to keep you out of mischief for a while ;)

Thayer
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For what it is worth, Cape Ann is actually in Massachusetts, north of Boston a bit, but don't let that dissuade you. I've spent a bit of time in that area these days visiting some good friends, and the remnants of the Cape Ann granite quarry operations look an awful lot like those I know well from my youth growing up along the coast of Maine.

I expect the Cape Ann Granite title would be a valuable reference for your efforts.

Thayer

W C Greene
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Howdy, another "idea" may be to investigate the YULE MARBLE operation in Colorado. This was connected with the Crystal River RR and the story plus fine photos of the old operation was in the book Crystal River Pictorial. Marble seems to have been quarried and worked much the same as granite. Maybe this will help?

Woodie


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