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Daniel Beresford
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Hi everyone,
I'm not sure if this part of the forum is for anything other than how-to's and tips on weathering, or if it's where we can post our own weathered models for feedback, but in the hope it's for the latter as well, here's a few weathering projects I've been working on.
First up is a work in progress of an O scale boxcar - the first O scale weathering project I've embarked upon, so feedback and criticisms would be very well received!
Note - seal every layer of work with Dullcote. All paint is acrylic unless otherwise stated.
Firstly, I took the base model - a Weaver kit:

After assembling the kit, I faded it down using a slightly lighter shade of green to the usual "Century" green the NYC used, using a very watery wash. Using a different brush, the excess is "lifted" from the model by placing the brush in the excess water and letting the bristles absorb the excess:

Once dry, the model is sealed with Dullcote, and a few more coats of the wash are added until the desired fade is achieved - sealing each layer with Dullcote to avoid spoiling the work already done:

Next, a watered down wash of brown paint is applied in the same manner as the fading wash, but only along places where dirt, grime and rust would gather. Once dry, this is also sealed with dullcote:

Next, black, brown, orange and white pastels are used to blend the whole thing together - black and dark browns in the areas grime would build up, browns and oranges where rust would gather, and white to tone down the whole car and blend the washes and dirt into an overall fade across the car. Again, this is built up in layers, each layer sealed with Dullcote:

After this is complete, rust dings and scratches are applied to the car using dark brown paint. Always use prototype photographs as references for the whole process, but especially for this part:

Next, used burnt sienna oil paints to halo the rust patches, dings and scratches, both to give a look of newer rust and to add texture to the rust. You can add orange pastel powder to the wet oil paint at this stage to add in further texture if you choose, but on this one I did not. Once the oil paint is fully dried, another coat of Dullcote is required.

This is as far as I've gotten with it so far. Here's a daylight shot to show off the overall effect:


I'll add further updates to the car as well as further projects in other scales in here as and when I can. :)

Si.
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Totally AWESOME ! Dan. :shocked:



:moose::moose::moose::moose::moose:



Si.

Daniel Beresford
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Cheers Si,

O scale is definitely easier to weather in than N! :D

slateworks
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Exceptional Dan. I'd love to achieve this type of effect but so far haven't had the patience!

Daniel Beresford
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Thanks Doug,

It's not too difficult to be honest, but yes it's time consuming.

In O scale, I can manage one side of a car in a single evening's session, though in N scale I can manage a whole car or two in the same time.

Daniel Beresford
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Sorry for the lack of updates, it takes a while to weather large models!

The NYC boxcar is mostly done now. Still needs the underframe and trucks weathering but I'm waiting on a delivery of Pan Pastels before I tackle those.







Daniel Beresford
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So... I actually got some progress made on the Southern gondola that I got from a recent trip to York. It's an Atlas Trainman 2-rail O scale car.

So far it's had a real wood deck added to the interior - made from coffee stirrers, naturally - as well as a brown acrylic fading wash, and a wash of black watercolour to dirty it up. The great thing with watercolours is that if you don't like how it looks, take a wet paintbrush to it and just wash it off! :D

After this was done, I went over the lettering and car number with a damp microbrush to remove the paint from the white and let it really pop again, as most of the time the lettering isn't too dirty in prototype photos.




















Si.
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:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: tastic !



:)



Si.

Herb Kephart
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Good work. The only thought that I have is that wheels and couplers are prohibited from being painted, so that cracks are more noticeable. They are solid rust color.

Surprised that so many coats, however thin don't start to cloud the work. But they don't seem to.


Herb

Lee B
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:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:
Great work!

Daniel Beresford
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Further progress on the Southern gondola from last night, one side has had dings and scratches and rust patches added. I think I went a bit OTT with this, but I'm going to attempt to tone it down a little today. We shall see. :D

Here's the prototype photograph I am working from - found on Southern Railfan (an amazing source of SOU images and information, and my Go-To place for references):



















Salada
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Excellent rust effects Dan !.

A couple of questions about Dullcote if I may (I've never used the stuff).

1) Do you spray it or brush it ?

2) Once applied, can the Dullcote layer be removed if required or is it 'permanent' ?

Regards,     Michael

W C Greene
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Michael, Dullcote (Testors) comes in a spray can or in a bottle. Spraying is best, the bottle Dullcote can be thinned and sprayed with an airbrush. This stuff is lacquer and the fumes can make one dizzy, etc. And since it is lacquer, it is indeed permanent. I have never had any problems with this, just observe normal precautions and use like any other spray paint. You might want to test the product on certain types of plastic, it could craze the surface but as I wrote, I have never had any problems.
Have fun and don't breathe the fumes!

Woodie

Michael M
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Michael,

Have been using Dullcote (spray) for decades without any problems at all.  Great for putting that sealing layer on after decals and weathering have been applied.  When printing out signs from my computer, or making decals, a shot of Dullcote works very well to keep the printing from bleeding.

I also use Patricia Nimrocks Clear Acrylic Sealer (matte).  It's very similar to Dullcote but cheaper.  I generally use it on buildings.  You can find it at WalMart in the craft section.

Daniel Beresford
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Michael,

Am I right in thinking you are from the UK?

If so, the Dullcote I use is actually Humbrol Acrylic Matt Sealer, I get it in rattle cans from Hobbycraft.

I just call it dullcote cos it's easier. :)

Si.
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 Hi Daniel :wave:



Michael has a similar view to that from a Torquay hotel window ...

... NO not hoards of majestically sweeping wilderbeast. ;)



As for Walmart ... Some kinda 'merican thang I think. L:



Testors 'Dullcote' IS actually available in Blightey. :)

I believe only from ... ngtrains.com ...

... who I think might distribute it here & there a bit as well. ???

Damn expensive getting it delivered, as the Royal-Mail class it as a W.M.D. !!



Most evil-smelling brain-cell killing rattle-can on the planet !

BUT it is very dull.



:moose:



Si.

Michael M
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Dan,

Not anywhere close to the U.K.  I'm all the way out in Southern California (La-La Land), where people have trouble driving even in clear weather.

Si is right.  WalMart is one of those 'merican things.  He is also right that Dullcote is kinda smelly, and would probably kill some brain cells especially if you are in an enclosed room.  I use it out on the patio to try and save what few brain cells I have left.

But, I have no problem using similar products as long as it does the job.

Salada
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My thanks to Woodie, Dan, Michael M & Si.

The situation seems to be that The All Powerful Supreme Ruler (otherwise known as the European disUnion) has banned Testor Dulcote on some spurious health grounds & Si is correct, our Royal Mail postal service (soon to be renamed Eumail "you post it, we'll lose it") won't handle the stuff because of some WMD Directive. 

As I could never justify air brush & compressor purchase simply for my RR pottering the stuff is out anyway, "Brush apply it or forget it - keep it CHEAP" is the Salada Wagon Work's motto.

Dan: 2 Michaels, one in CA; me in seaside clean beach Paradise (rural SW England), far from Walmarts, Home Depot & shopping malls.

Regards,  Michael

Michael M
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Michael,

Eumail???  That's a new one for me. 

Sounds like it might be headed for a train wreck.


Time for a mail joke?


49 cents is a really good price to mail a letter; 24 cents for delivery and 25 cents for the storage.


One good thing about the Post Office -- it's over 200 years old and yet it's never been hindered by progress.


A slogan for post offices around the world:


Lick it, stick it and kiss it goodbye!

Si.
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" I could never justify air brush & compressor purchase "


Hi Michael :wave:



This is confusing !

NO ... not the Sou. Cal. one ...

... the Sou. West one !! ;)



Have you got about 50 of the Queens Quids ?? ???



I did have ... but I spent about 20 on a ROLLS ROYCE airbrush ...

... and another 30 on a pretty darn nifty compressor !!



If I'd gone into London Graphics Center ...

... I'd a been fleeced by about 300 Quid or so !! :shocked: :shocked: :shocked: :shocked: :shocked:



I wanted one about 30 years ago, when I was a student ! ...

... but of course I had to buy high-brow text-books & go to the laundry ... ;)

... and have some dough left over for beer, pop-music, cool-threads & GIRLS ! ...

... so I never did get that 300 Quid airbrush & comp.



But last year ... I DID ! :)

Just cost me about 50 for BOTH on eBay ! :cool: :cool: :cool: :cool: :cool:

Freakin' AWESOME !! :thumb:

Want the details ?? L:



:moose:



Si.



Damn nice weathering Daniel !!

I've always been a bit of a 'Southern' fan ...

... Grandpops worked for the 'Southern' ...

... that's the one about a few thousand miles East of yours ...

... kinda London way ! ;)


W C Greene
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For years I used a compressor for my airbrushes and had to install in line water traps due to the humidity here in Tejas. But a few years ago, I got "turned on" to using CO2 in a small tank. I found that I didn't need the water trap, or have to listen to the old Paasche or whatever compressor dance across the floor and without a "proper" in line tank, the compressors supplied air in a steady "puff puff puff" and sometimes really pissed me off when I was painting someone else's model.
Now, when I run low on CO2, I just go to the local welding supply and get the tank refilled for about 10 bucks and that lasts quite a long time. I have a pressure gauge and a "manifold" which can handle 3 airbrushes (as if I needed 3 at once!). I am very satisfied with this arrangement. Does anybody else use "bottled air", not the little expensive hobby things, but a tank?
Just my way...

Woodie

Si.
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Hi Guys :wave:


I did think about getting a CO2 tank.


You can get fairly small ones for fizzy-drink making machines & paintball guns ...

... dunno how long they last though.


The other easily available type in lots of different sizes, are CO2 fire-extinguishers.

In the UK they have to be checked every few years & re-certified.

A brand new one can cost 50 to 60 quid ...

... but I seem recall I found a place selling refurbished fire-extinguishers for about 20 quid.

They just test the valve & top it up if needed, they also fill empty ones as well.


You can get regulators with the standard fire-extinguisher thread fitting ...

... from aquarium & horticultural shops, that are about 40 quid or so I think.


I was amazed at the compressor I got for around 30 quid or so.

It does actually have a tank & a moisture trap, and is oil-free as well.

A lot of pretty 'pro kit' for the money.


I found model shops & graphic art places were fairly expensive.

I got mine from a place selling stuff for finger-nail painting !

Loads of 'em for sale on eBay.


A bit noisy, but I just turn up The Zep. on the stereo !!

It doesn't turn on much though, cos of the tank.

I suppose an extra-long hose could be an option as well.


Steal of a deal really.



:!:



Si.

Thayer
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I am using a scuba tank and regulator to feed my airbrush, and last night, a brad nailer. 
It lasts a good long time, though I don't really know for sure as I inevitably leave the valve open on the way to bed at some point before I run the tank out intentionally. It seems like once or twice a year I go in for a $10 fill at the local dive shop, but I also don't do a tremendous amount of painting.
 Thayer

Last edited on Sun Oct 15th, 2017 04:50 am by Thayer

Si.
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Hi again Guys :wave:


Just one thing about regulators on the top of gas bottles.

A true story from an engineer I used to work with.


I assume this was with a largish 5ft tall industrial gas bottle.

But one fell over where he worked & had it's regulator busted off the top.

It went straight through the side of the building ...

... & ended up in the parking-lot, destroying a few cars in the process as well ! :shocked:

So be careful !! :w:


:old dude:


Si.

Salada
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Water traps ? Exploding regulators ? CO2 tanks ? Diving masks ?

Thanks chaps, I'm more convinced than ever that I'll stick to my old sable brushes - instant start-up, instant clean, no in line oil condensate but the Humbrol rattle can matte sounds useful - thanks Dan.

Regards,     Michael

Last edited on Sun Oct 15th, 2017 09:33 pm by Salada

W C Greene
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I think everybody is making too much of the CO2 tank. It is perfectly safe, small, refillable, no noise or vibrations. I used compressors for many years and now that I have this little tank, I would not go back to the "old" ways. I have no problem with spray cans however, I use them on my stuff. Weathering is done with chalks and washes using a brush. The reason that I still use the airbrush is that when some guy is paying $$$ for a "custom paint" job, he EXPECTS that I will use an airbrush. Ya gotta do what ya gotta do.

Woodie

Daniel Beresford
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I got my airbrush and compressor for £70 a few years ago, and it's great, I will always paint locomotives, cars, buildings, etc with it if I can.

However, for weathering, nothing beats a good old fashioned horsehair brush, imo.

Si.
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Hi Daniel :wave:



Gotta agree with you and Unk. Sal. on brushes ! :thumb:

My brush collection is my friend !! :)



An interesting type of brush I hadn't seen before, came in to the collection recently.

Bought in a pack of 100 for next to nothing on eBay.

I think they are intended for very fine 'make-up' application.



Basically a very short & thin polypropylene handle ...

... with a kinda really small 1mm ish ball of foam on the end.

Essentially a ultra cheap 'one shot' disposable 'brush'.

Interesting. L:



BTW, I don't think CO2 tanks are unsafe at all.

Just an anecdote about a VERY BIG one, unlikely to be powering an airbrush. :shocked:



£35 compressors are really amazing quality these days & well worth it also ...

... just for those who think decent ones cost a few 100 notes.



With the built in tank, noise is absolutely minimal & obviously not constant.

Over the moon with the price & performance of mine. :cool:



:moose:



Si.



Great weathering again Daniel.

Good to discus methods as well. :!:

Daniel Beresford
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Si, I believe you mean "micro brushes" - indeed used for makeup application. I get them in packs of a couple of hundred from eBay for a few quid.

Very useful. I use them for applying plastic weld along joints on kits, as well as for applying small amounts of paint or weathering powders to my models.

They make great detail parts too when you are finished with them - I made a fuel pump for my HO layout out of one, back in the day. :)

chasv
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the other gas you can use is nitrogen the telephone companies us it to low pressurize paper insulated cable as it is dry and oil free you can get small bottles of it also

Daniel Beresford
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Well, it's been a while since I've updated this, and for that I apologise.

I've been working on some HO scale cars over the last couple of days - a pair of Athearn/Roundhouse "blue box" type kits of different types of rib sided boxcars.

So far I've used a mix of oil paint and pan pastels on the cars, using the Mike Confalone method detailed in a video series on Trainmasters TV. Here's where I'm at right now:

Midland Belt #38134 (ex-Western Pacific)







Burlington Northern #732359






Daniel Beresford
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Today I've managed a little more on the BN car and started on a SOO LINE repaint.















Finally, I've started repainting and relettering a Southern Pacific caboose to go with them. This will be interesting to weather, that's for sure! :D

Daniel Beresford
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More HO scale cars!

Walthers PS2 hopper:












Bachmann 40' High-Cube






Atlas (?) 50' covered hopper







Accurail 50' covered hopper (Work in progress)


Roundhouse 50' Railbox (Work in Progress)

Si.
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Hi Daniel :wave:



The weathering is looking very nice !

In South London EVERYTHING goes rusty !! ;)



I've always had a soft spot for those jazzy Railbox yellow schemes. :bg:

Not too much GRIME on that one please. ;)



:moose:



Si.

Daniel Beresford
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Hey Si,

No, no avalanche of grime going on the railbox. I have a soft spot for railboxes, which is another reason I'm going modern on my HO scale layout.

This particular railbox is being weathered after one from a reference photo of an example which appears to have spent 30 years in the California sun, so it's very bleached but otherwise pretty well preserved.

I'll try and dig the photo out the next time I work on the car. :)

Daniel Beresford
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Nevermind - found it!



See? Faded but otherwise in pretty good nick!

Michael M
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Daniel

Your weathering is really great! :glad:


I'm going for a sun-bleached, sand-pitted kinda of look on my equipment.  Any suggestions on how to achieve that kind of look?  Got to keep it on the simple side.  I do have an airbrush just not sure where it is.  I generally use rattle-cans or acrylics.


Daniel Beresford
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Hi Michael.

I'd recommend a rattle can of matt sealer and some pan pastels.

Look for a lighter tone to what you're applying it to, and 100% use reference photos!


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