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Salada
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Can anyone please tell why so many of you folk dilute their weathering/ageing India ink in IPA ? (isopropylalcohol).
I always use water + India ink without causing any grain raising. What is the advantage of using IPA ?.

Thanks,     Michael 

Rod Hutchinson
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My understanding is that it evaporates quickly and it reduces the surface tension in the ink, similar to what detergent does to water.

Si.
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 " What is the advantage of using IPA ? "


Hi Sal. :wave:



It is possible on some extra smooth surfaces ...

... to get quite serious 'water marks' if using overly hard-water.

Of course battery-topup & steam-iron 'de-ionized' water is favorite for perfectionists.



Or if you don't wanna pay for it ...

... grab a few 'lumps of ice' from the frost-box ...

... melt 'em down & bottle it !

Pretty well 'de-ionized' & super el-cheapo !



The maker of a recent resin-kit I got, in the instructions, said ... :old dude:

... " whatever you do DON'T clean the parts using regular washing-up liquid ! "

He said it very often contains 'lanolin' amongst other contaminants ? ?



Dunno what he uses as mould-release, but he said ACCing straight outta the box is best.

Another resin-kit I have though, seems swathed in some kinda mould-release. :mex:





Make sure you use the right kinda IPA Sal. ! :P

Some of it froths-up a lot, as it comes out of the airbrush !! ;)



Alternatively, a handy bottle of 'Stoli.' or meths can work pretty well. :shocked:

Or just add it to the beer, to make PUNK IPA ! :Crazy:






:cb:



Si.

Salada
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My thanks to Rod & Si for their prompt replies.

Rod: I think you are probably correct - quick evaporation & IPA is certainly a very good wetting agent for otherwise water repellent surfaces such as plastic or oil based painted wood.

Si: Now THAT is my kind of kit except I'd rather pay a little more for an instant liquid supply on demand. I hadn't thought about lime scale water marks, I ain't that fussy - anything near hot water/steam gets white streaks.

'De Luxe' brands of detergent certainly contain an emollient such as lanolin ("hands that do dishes...." old TV advert) but el cheapo stuff from the £1 store is unlikely to except -- (funny story, see below **).

Salada Wagon Works have never knowingly turned out out anything with "a very smooth surface", against Company policy.

** in the long lost past I worked for a now defunct large chemical business, making the principal crucial ingredient for a lot of the world's detergents - including hair shampoos.
We also made agricultural pesticides (using the same plant !!) & it was well known that the first insecticide batch always foamed a lot (having just switched from making Madame Pompadours' Luxury Hair Shampoo or whatever brand). We never heard what happened to the hair of purchasers of the first shampoo run after switching the plant back to whoever's shampoo brand !!. Happy days, down the pub for a 3 pint lunch then back to work; not a Certificate of Competence between us but we always made stuff & exported it worldwide at a profit.

Regards,    Michael

    

Rod Hutchinson
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Another strong detergent was Kodak photoflow.  Unsure if it is still available in this digital photography era.

W C Greene
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Howdy Michael, I dilute my india ink with alcohol...straight, no water. It works fine for me and I get the woozy warm feeling whenever I stain bass or balsa with it. Over many years I found that water+alcohol+ink sometimes, SOMETIMES caused the thin woods to warp so when I removed the water, I found that the wood doesn't warp or warp as badly. But then, now I build in a larger scale and don't use much 1/64 or 1/32 stock so maybe that's a reason for minimal warpage. Or maybe it's just because "I hold my mouth right!" (an old Texas saying)

Woodie

Salada
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Rod : I ain't a photologist but I would doubt if such chemicals were still generally available.

Woodie :  Ah !  The voice of Texican wisdom - I hadn't thought of 'warpage', which I guess pure IPA wouldn't cause. Makes more sense than Dubbya ever did (another TX zip coder).

Thanks & Regards,    Michael

Si.
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Hi Guys :wave:



I have used the 'Ilford' photographic wetting-agent ...

... same stuff as 'Kodak' photoflow ...

... just very pure detergent of some sort.



I'm sure it can still be had for film developing purposes.



L:



Si.

Michael M
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I'm having trouble locating India ink.  Where does everyone get there's?

I have some Kiwi Black Leather Dye (liquid).  Would that work just as well?

Rod Hutchinson
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Brown and black shoe dye works well.  Colour variation can be aided by diluting with isopropyl alcohol.  Very useful arrangement.

Michael M
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Rod,

Thanks for the advice.

One word of warning for everyone...don't spill it on the carpet.:bang:

Michael M
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Getting a bit off track here, but has anyone considered an accelerated way of naturally weathering strip wood?  Something short of leaving it out in the rain and sunshine for a few years?

Rod Hutchinson
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Most modellers use paints.  I just did a door using Copic marker pens.  Walnut brown and light grey.  Work them together before the dry, the liquid inside will mix the colours.  Dry brush with white paint. 

Laurie Green in Australia has good techniques.
http://www.outbackmodels.com/Clinic%20Front%20Page/clicic%20front%20page.htm

Last edited on Sun Oct 29th, 2017 12:33 am by Rod Hutchinson

Ken C
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Michael

I buy my India Ink at (Michaels) they carry Black,Blue,Red & Green.

Salada
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Michael M wrote:


Getting a bit off track here, but has anyone considered an accelerated way of naturally weathering strip wood?  Something short of leaving it out in the rain and sunshine for a few years?


Yes, I have.

1)  A strong solution of Ferrous Sulphate + water for a few days works well but you MUST rinse thoroughly after immersion to remove the acid and this can wash a little of the colour off. Not recommended for contact with steel rails but I'm probably one of the few who like tracklaying in Real Steel (TM).

 2) A very strong solution of Sodium Bicarbonate + water develops a good 'high desert' reddish-brown but this largely vanishes once the wood is rinsed and then fades to a disappointing pale creamy-blonde-off white after a year so of using in a model. Not recommended.

3) A combination of 1) above followed by a quick boil in diluted bleach solution develops a good 'high desert' silvery grey sheen to timber ties (see photo below if I can find it). If treatment is too prolonged the timber is seriously weakened and can become unsuitable if using for real functional ties.

4) Immersion in a mix of Acetic Acid (strong vinegar) + fine steel wool gives a similar effect to 3) above but I haven't yet experimented with this much.

5) Stain (preferably solvent based) to approx shade required, dry, then quick boil in dilute bleach to shade required. Prolonged boiling will seriously weaken the timber.

 Results of treatment 4) :  (roughly similar also to 3) above)




 I offer NO guarantees as to the health & safety, environmental, global warming, carcinogenic etc. etc. or "anything known to the State of California" re the above treatments.

One of the critical factors is the nature of the wood itself. Avoid any 'oily' wood such as pine, walnut or mahogany.


Formulas & methods courtesy of Salada Wagon Works.
 
Photo by Salada. Regards,       Michael

Last edited on Mon Oct 30th, 2017 08:28 pm by Salada

Michael M
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Michael,

Thanks for the suggestions.  I wasn't planing on using it for ties since I lay mostly Peco On30 track and it is buried in sand and dirt.  But for shacks and dilapidated buildings I think it would work great.  I'm looking to get that weathered sun-bleached look on wood.

Salada
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Michael,

For sun bleached timber where mechanical strength isn't important use treatment no. (3).

Regards,     Michael  (a.k.a. Salada)

Michael M
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I did a little searching on the web and found many different ways to age stripwood.  Some were simple while others were a bit complex.  Everyone seemed to have their own favorite way of achieving the desired results.

I did a little testing on some scrap wood with varying results.  I ended up using a simple way by using some grey acrylic paint thinned with alcohol.  It gave a me a weathered/silver look on the wood.



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