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'Henderson Bay Branch' - 1:87 Scale
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 Posted: Wed Mar 11th, 2020 04:23 pm
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Reg H
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I haven't posted much in the HO thread. 

Most of my work lately has been on the logging operation. 
Those posts are in the Mining and Logging thread.

Projects are on hold for a bit while I re-organize my model building space. 
It has never really been set up. 

When we moved in, 20 years ago,
all my model stuff went into a space in the basement, basically as a place to put it.

It has not gotten any better over the years.

So a complete re-organization is going on. 
I will have before and after photos when the job is complete.

Reg




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 Posted: Sun Mar 22nd, 2020 10:27 pm
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Reg H
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My model building corner started out 20 years ago,
when we first moved into this house, as just a place to put my model stuff. 

I didn't have time to do any model building.
As time went on, I carved out some time for model building.
 
But that time was so precious, and rare,
that I was not motivated to organize the space or even clean up after myself.

I have a bit more time now, and I really got tired of the mess.  


Here are some "before" photos:





Yes, it was this dingy. 
I survived using a collection of desk lamps. 

This painting area was a particular mess. 
No organization at all.  





The big green unit was here when we moved in. 
I originally thought I would use it to organize the Unimat and it's bits and pieces. 
All it really did was take up space. 

The Unimat parts are now in some of the parts drawers. 
The Unimat itself is in the machine shop at the moment. 
But it will move back here mounted on a piece of 3/4" plywood. 
It will live on a lower shelf except when in use.  

There has definitely been a double triage process. 

I have gone through much of my stuff (some still remains to be sorted)
and made decisions regarding keeping, giving away/selling, throwing away. 

So far, all that I haven't wanted to keep,
is not worth giving away, let alone trying to sell.

The second stage consists of figuring out how and where,
to store those items I want to keep. 

There are three levels to that. 
Immediate/handy use, easily accessible when wanted/needed,
and "cold" storage, for items with which I don't want to part, but have no immediate use.





Some of these parts drawers date back to the mid 1970's. 
Only some of them are labelled and nothing is in any kind of order.  

The nut can in the corner is my pencil soldering iron stand. 
I think that soldering iron dates from my teen years.  


And "After"





Not only is it cleaner,
a set of bright shop lights have been added. 

It is a much more pleasant space. 





The parts drawers here used to hold some of the paints. 
Other paints were squirreled away in a box. 
It now contains just airbrushes and airbrush parts. 

The paint booth is MicroMark's "portable" booth. 
It looks like a decent unit. 
I am looking forward to trying it out. 

The Iwata airbrush cleaning station promises to be a big improvement, too.  
I plan to mount a paper towel holder somewhere.  





The piece of 1/2" plywood I used to make the paint shelf,
had been stored on end and had developed a bit of a bow. 
It doesn't really matter.





This brace of parts drawers is a big improvement over the old ones. 
For one thing, there are more draws, and there are some bigger ones.
 
It was my original intent to keep only parts and supplies in the drawers, no tools. 
That proved to be impracticable.  

I was also determined not to stack stuff on top of the drawer units. 
That went by the wayside very quickly. 

However, I will make a point of limiting what goes on top. 
The habit got way out of hand prior to the re-organization. 

With this arrangement I have room to expand my collection,
of oddments and impedimentia.

What is not obvious from the photos is that the drawers are arranged alphabetically. 
The old drawers were just willy-nilly, and it drove me crazy. 
Keeping them alphabetical as new items are collected will take some time. 
But it is well worth it.

Scratch building supplies have largely been moved to a big bin. 
I haven't scratch built anything since switching to HO,
and have no immediate plans to undertake a project. 
But they are handy should something come up. 

The stack of PVC tubing stores some wire and tubing. 
Something that is always handy even when building from kits. 

The project is not yet complete. 
I just couldn't wait to show off the progress. 

There is a high shelf planned to get some completed models,
that won't be used on the current layout (many of them being 1/4" scale)
out of boxes. 

They may collect dust, but they will be less likely to be damaged. 

Plus some minor details, like cover plates on the electrical outlets.  

Reg




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 Posted: Tue Mar 24th, 2020 04:07 pm
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Reg H
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First project out of the re-organized shop.





This is a Cornerstone kit.  And a very nice one indeed. 
The only modification I made was a squirt of Dullcoat on all the parts.

In hindsight, it might have been a good idea to tone down the white a bit.
 
I still might see what I can do about that,
though it is more difficult on an assembled model.

One of the best plastic models I have ever assembled. 
Every single part fits exactly as presented in the instructions.

About the best wall assemblies I have seen on a plastic kit. 
I could "feel" the walls snap into vertical. 

It took me from about 10:00AM to 5:30PM, with a break for lunch, to build the kit.
I use MEK for assembly which helps things go pretty fast.  

It is not listed as specifically a GN prototype,
but it sure reminds me of several GN depots in this neck of the woods. 


I know, I promised the NP 1200 class caboose.
I am having second thoughts about that project. 

I did dig it out and spread out the parts.
 
My original plan was to letter it for the timber company,
the story being that they acquired it second hand.  

The more I think about it, the more I want to give it NP lettering. 
I love the 1200's. 

I built a 1/4" scale version many years ago. 
One of the items that got auctioned off in the divorce.  


My plan, in the course of developing "scene library" options,
is to have an option to run the branch line as NP. 
As well as BN, or whatever else gets my attention.

Another consideration is that I want to get the rest of the railroad roughed in. 
Currently the west end and the logging terminal are all that can be called "roughed in". 

I need to get the east end in some kind of shape,
build the reload for the timber operation,
and get in some basic scenery from the west end east.  


No cover plates on outlets yet. 
And yes, I bungled the measurement for the cutout of the outlet in the background.

Reg




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 Posted: Tue Mar 24th, 2020 04:22 pm
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Reg H
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Some thoughts on the reorganized shop:

Having a pleasant work space is a very big plus.
I should have worked on the space a long time ago.

Having the most used tools immediately to hand makes the work go much faster. 
It took less than five minutes to get in the habit of putting a tool back in it's place after use. 
That habit really keeps the work space clutter down.  

One does not have to go searching through a pile of tools on the work bench,
looking for the one needed. 

My original goal of not having any tools in the parts drawers was a good goal.
 
Currently, there are some tools in the drawers,
notably the X-Acto knives and the tweezers, that see regular use. 

I need to figure out a way to get those tools on the peg board. 
If I can do that, then the only tool that needs to be on the bench at any one time,
is the tool in current use. 

Other than the file holder and the drill bit holder,
I do not want any tool holders intruding into the work space.  

Yes, I need to replenish my supply of numbered drill bits. 

Some tools, those that are serve specific, and limited purposes,
can still reside in drawers. 

Reg




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 Posted: Tue Mar 24th, 2020 05:04 pm
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Ken C
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Reg

That is a very smart :2t: looking station.


As far as the outlet goes "been there done that".  :bang:

I only wish I could be as organized with my shop supplies.




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 Posted: Tue Mar 24th, 2020 10:04 pm
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Tom Ward
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Reg

Your station is awesome. 
Beautiful model. 

The reorganized shop looks great too. 
I recently re-did my shop and really enjoy working there now. 

Once you get a cover plate on that outlet the hole probably won’t even show. 
You can also get oversized plates just for that sort of thing.

Tom




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 Posted: Tue Mar 24th, 2020 10:34 pm
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Reg H
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Ken:

I think it came out pretty well. 

I never used to do plastic models for the railroad (except to scratch build with styrene)
so this HO layout with a population of Cornerstone buildings is a new one for me.

The upside is that a presentable layout is emerging. 
Non of my previous layouts got very far beyond the Plywood Pacific stage. 

My previous On30 layout can still be found in the On30 thread. 
It is down to about page 6 now, though.

I have built a far amount of airplane models in plastic. 
I have to say that Walthers has really figured out this plastic model business. 
The quality of this station is very impressive.

The caveat in all this is the logging operation.
You can see that progress in 'Logging & Mining' under "Henderson Bay Timber Company".  

The Slatyfork Mill set me back a year.  That isn't a whine. 
I am enjoying every minute of the work going into the logging operation. 

Reg




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 Posted: Tue Mar 24th, 2020 10:38 pm
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Reg H
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Tom:

A pleasant working space makes a huge difference. 

This now classifies as the best I have ever had. 
A few weeks ago it was the worst. 

Dark, dingy, dirty and disorganized. 

I have only two problems with it.  No windows. 
It is in the basement, so there is no help for that. 

And it really is quite a walk to reach the main living areas of the house. 
I would prefer to be closer to where the action is. 

But that can't be helped either. 

Those two problems are really not a big deal. 

Reg




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 Posted: Tue Mar 31st, 2020 01:23 am
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Reg H
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The overhead shelf has been installed:





The purpose is to have a place, safer than a box, away from the general work area.

The logging engine house was placed in my care by John Henderson,
in order to make a few repairs.
 
According to John, it was built by John Labbe. 
John Henderson and John Labbe were good friends.  

John Henderson passed away, as most of you are aware, so the model is in my keeping.
I have no written proof it was build by John Labbe, but it is a nice model. 

I would very much like to pass it on to somebody else. 
No charge, except whoever might want it, will have to come and pick it up. 
It is much to fragile to ship.





The shelf filled up much faster than I anticipated. 


The water tower is a kit, the small depot is a laser kit, the larger depot is scratchbuilt. 
All in 1/4" scale. 

As is the Howe truss bridge.  Which is also from a kit. 
Though that kit consisted of nothing but a set of plans and a pile of strip wood.


The white tub has parts for an elevated fuel tank. 
It will get finished and put somewhere around the logging operation.

Reg




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 Posted: Wed Apr 1st, 2020 04:12 am
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Reg H
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The second project out of the reorganized model shop is coming along. 
I started construction on the Idaho Hotel from Bar Mills.

It is an excellent kit. 
A structure I had my eye on, ever since the plans came out in the Gazette in 2000 (I think).  

My original idea was to scratch build it in 1/4" scale. 
But I could never figure out where to put it, and other projects got put before that one. 

Bar Mills HO model came up, and I sprang for it. 
It will be across the street from the brick station. 
I have yet to name the eastern end of the branch line.  Soon.

That project is on hold for a bit while I wait for shingles. 
The kit comes with simulated roll roofing. 
I would prefer shingles and ordered some up.

Meanwhile, I did a "white tornado" job on the machine shop. 
It has been neglected for awhile,
and  like all neglected space, collected items that had no business in the shop.

The current machine shop project is getting put away. 

In 2017 I started off with a Stuart Models 10V vertical steam engine. 
I realized early that my skills were not up to working on that rather expensive set of castings.

So I ordered plans from a company called "Is it Broken".  I concluded that it was. 
I kept finding design flaws in the drawings and having to make modifications.  

But that project served it's purpose.  Almost all the materials were from my scrap box,
so very little expense (Except the blank for the flywheel. That was a bit pricey)
and it brought my skills up to where I feel I can go back to the Stuart engine. 

I will have photos of the Idaho Hotel (which will be named the Cascadia on my layout)
as soon as it is finished.  That shouldn't take long once the shingles get here.

Reg




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