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On30 - In A Small Room
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 Posted: Wed Jul 11th, 2018 09:23 pm
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Tom Ward
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Started laying track.  I settled on slightly aged ties and rails showing rust on the sides but shiny on top.  The ties are bare wood, no creosote, and are aged grey with some raised grain.  When I first added grain and stained the ties I was disappointed, thinking that all the effort wasn't worth it.  Now a month or so later I came back to it and am pleased with the result.  I'm laying down track on the test track/time saver before moving on to the layout.  I wanted to develop the technique and work out the bugs since this is my first effort at laying track.
- Tom

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 Posted: Thu Jul 12th, 2018 01:32 am
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Reg H
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That is great looking track work.  I sure like the look of those FastTracks turnouts.  If I were to handlay track again, I would bite the bullet and spend the bucks for their turnout tools.  

Even brand new rail is going to be brown to reddish brown everywhere but on top.  I can't imagine laying any kind of track, handlaid or commercial, without painting the rail.  

On my handlaid track I cut the ties from whatever is handy.  On the now defunct On30 layout I had a supply of western red cedar.  A light staining with india ink diluted in alcohol gave a nice effect of weathered, untreated, ties. 

I am having some struggles with that on my HO layout.  On the On30 it was easy because it was all handlaid,  I spray painted the rail before laying it. I am using all commercial track on the HO layout (and not entirely sure it was the best approach).  I laid the flex track and now am going back and painting the rail.  It is tedious and not turning out like I hoped.

I think the next stretch of track will be spray painted (yep, ties and all) prior to being laid.

Reg



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 Posted: Tue Jul 31st, 2018 04:39 am
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Michael D
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Hello Tom,
I'm curious as to what make your roundhouse is,and if you've finished it.

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 Posted: Fri Aug 3rd, 2018 12:53 pm
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Tom Ward
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Michael - The roundhouse is a Thomas Yorke Kit that I got from eBay nine years ago.  I haven't gotten much done on the layout in the last month but hope to be laying track in the yard soon.  Once the track is down around the turntable the roundhouse is next on the list.  I screwed up on my order for ties, ordered O scale instead of On30 so the turnaround time brought things to a halt.  Well, that and everything else.  Anyway, hope to be back on it soon.
- Tom

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 Posted: Mon Aug 27th, 2018 11:50 am
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Tom Ward
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Getting back to the American Smelter in Durango.  I'm basing my model on the drawing from 1910.  It shows two Roaster Houses, one with 7 reverberatory furnaces and another with 10 Godfrey roasters.  There's also a long open sided structure with 36 Huntington pots and then two Furnace Houses.  Along the front are a Dryer House, Sampler House, Crusher House, an Ore Unloading Shed and numerous Ore Bins.  There's an office building to the left and a machine shop to the right and out back is an Engine House/Boiler House and an Assay Office.
That's a buncha stuff to model and considering that my room is only 12' X 11' I think I'll have to down size the Smelter a bit.
- Tom

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 Posted: Mon Aug 27th, 2018 12:05 pm
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Tom Ward
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I've been able to find a number of photographs to give me an idea of what the buildings looked like.  I have been unable to find any information on operation though and I need that to be able to reduce the size of the operation and still have it be believable.  At least to me.  With a Stamp Mill I understand the equipment and the flow of operation.  With the smelter there's different styles of roasters and furnaces, not to mention multiple locations for ore bins.  I do get the Ore Unloading Shed, Sampler and Crusher Houses.  What comes next?  Does the ore go through each different furnace and roaster.  How does it get transferred?
I'm kinda hoping that someone in the group might be able to shed some light here.
- Tom

Last edited on Mon Aug 27th, 2018 11:57 pm by Tom Ward

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 Posted: Wed Aug 29th, 2018 08:52 am
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Tom Ward
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I found an update to the 1910 drawing dated 1919.  It gives additional information and shows several improvements.  Probably the biggest change was the addition of a building on the left side of the drawing called the Cottrell Plant.  The Cottrell process uses static electricity (high voltage, 100k volts!) to separate solid particles, dust, from the gases discharged from the roasters.
- Tom

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 Posted: Wed Aug 29th, 2018 08:58 am
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Tom Ward
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The 1919 drawing also shows the large roaster building on the right that had housed 7 reverberatory roasters has been renamed the Flotation Plant and 60% of it is used for storage.  It appears that most of the large buildings at this time were iron framing with corrugated steel siding.
- Tom

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 Posted: Wed Aug 29th, 2018 09:58 am
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Tom Ward
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The remaining Roaster House has 10 Godfrey roasters, shown in both drawings.  I haven't been able to find any good close-up photographs of these but I read that they operated like a large tub with stationary combs inside.  The tub was mechanically rotated to stir the roasting ore.  The top half of the tub was lifted by a crane so fresh ore could be added and the roasted ore was poured out the front into a wheeled truck or dolly.  I did find a photo of the outside of the Roaster House which is open on the sides and provides a glimpse of the Godfrey Roasters.  There are five showing as white blobs in the left center of the photo.  My source for information and photos is a digital copy of the 1915 book Mining and Engineering World.
- Tom

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 Posted: Wed Aug 29th, 2018 10:13 am
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Tom Ward
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The 1919 drawing shows that the Huntungton Pots were reduced in number from 36 to 26.  I found a good description of the Huntigton Pot on Wikipedia.  The photo comes from the 1915 book Mining and Engineering World.  This write-up gives a clue to the flow of processing so I now have a better understanding of the smelting process at this facility.
- Tom

"Treatment of Galena. — By the Huntington-Heberlein process, called also the " H and H process," the galena-bearing ore is given an incomplete, rather rapid roast, to reduce the amount of sulphur to 12 to 14 per cent. The product from the roaster is mixed with a certain proportion of limestone and silicious ore, wet down, and charged into a hemispherical cast iron pot 8i ft. diameter by 4 ft. deep, having a capacity of 8 to 10 tons as shown in Fig. 82. Within the pot, and forming a false-bottom, is placed a circular arched plate perforated with |-in. holes to admit air to the charge under pressure. Upon the false-bottom is scattered a wheelbarrow-load of ashes, then a carload (one ton) of hot ore from the roaster. On this is dumped 8 tons of charge wet to about 6 per cent moisture. Air, under the pressure of a few ounces, is admitted beneath the false-bottom, and coming up through the hot ore, it produces a burning-temperature and starts the combustion of the charge. The heat gradually ascending to the top, the charge becomes red-hot, and SO2 and SO3 escape. At the end of the roasting, which lasts sometimes sixteen hours, there remains only 3 to 5 per cent sulphur if the charge is properly burned. The pot is now inverted to discharge the contents, and this falls out in an agglomerated, red-hot mass. It is broken to a size suited to subsequent treatment in the blast-furnace."

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