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'Diesel Forest Railroading' - In HO Scale
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 Posted: Mon Oct 7th, 2019 04:51 pm
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161st Post
Alan Sewell
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What I did was to convert an underused spur, relaying it to give two spurs.
 
But I needed to relay a switch before anything else,
as the grandchildren’s ministrations had broken a rail.

I think the switch was about thirty-five years old (gulp!!)
so does not owe me anything.

The mill is “kit-bashed” from a Pacific Northwest-style Plywood loading shed,
by more than doubling its size.  It will hold up to three 60-foot cars.

A photo to where I am at present is attached.
Will update Freerails when the scenery is in.

Alan





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 Posted: Mon Oct 7th, 2019 07:16 pm
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Reg H
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Alan:

That looks pretty ambitious.  
I am striving to keep things as simple as possible.

I plan to use boxcars for finished lumber out. 
I don't know when they started using the bulkhead flatcars for shipping lumber,
but I suspect (and you may know) that it was quite a few years ago. 
But I am already dealing with the challenge of loads/empties with the log cars. 

There may be a slow down in layout work for a bit for me, too.  
I started the project of installing a new headliner in my airplane. 
I have a VERY small airplane and contorting myself in there to get the installation done,
can only be done in short stretches before this old body starts complaining rather loudly.
But I have to get it done.

Reg




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 Posted: Mon Oct 7th, 2019 07:47 pm
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Alan Sewell
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Hi Reg

I don't know about ambitious, but I like switching,
and the saw mill/wood products plant is about two thirds of the layout.

I just looked in a couple of books and it confirms that up to the mid-60's,
lumber was loaded board by board into boxcars and sometimes flat cars.

Flat cars were also used to haul loads of big timbers 10x10 and above I think.
Bulk head flats came in in the mid 60's and center beams in the late 70's and on.

I don't have any bulkhead/center beams on my 1960 era operations,
but they will be there in force when I do 1980's and beyond.

I abandoned trying to do log loading and unloading as too complicated.
I have seen some attempts but well beyond my capabilites.

Logs are loaded at a transfer(s) "offstage" and I use the big 5-0 unloader at the mill.
I am prepared to make the compromises.

Seem to remember you had other issues with your plane.
Another time consuming hobby

Regards

Alan  


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 Posted: Mon Oct 7th, 2019 08:39 pm
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Reg H
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Alan:

Yes, the five-fingered unloader will be used for logs at both the woods end and the mill.

I like switching operations, too.  
But I learned some time ago that elaborate layouts don't work too well for me. 
So in designing this layout, I kept looking for ways to eliminate turnouts.
A typical operating session will involve quite a lot of switching. 

It will require some creativity, too,
as there just are not many places to put cars as they are shuffled around. 

The headliner was a rather princely gift,
from a friend whose business is refurbishing aircraft. 
How that friendship developed is a long story. 
He lives in Bolivar, Tennessee.
 
If you have never been to Bolivar you are in good company. 
Lots of people have never been to Bolivar. 
He provided the new seats for my airplane in 2008. 
Carolyn and I managed to visit him during our east coast vacation in 2017. 

Anyway...I posted a selfie on Facebook taken in my airplane and Shelby
(the friend in Bolivar) noticed that my airplane lacked a headliner. 
My airplane is a 1967 vintage Cessna 150. 
It came with a wool headliner that finally got too ragged for use a few years ago,
so I ripped it out.
 
Shelby fabricated and sent to me a new headliner as a Christmas gift last year.  
Airplane headliners (like everything else in aviation) command an impressive price. 
So it was a very major gift.

I hadn't installed it because I knew that I was going to have to install a new transponder,
which involved a new GPS antenna on top of the airplane.
I didn't want to install the headliner and then have to pull part of it down to install the antenna. 

Now the new transponder is installed,
its time to get the headliner in before Christmas rolls around again.

Reg




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 Posted: Mon Oct 7th, 2019 09:21 pm
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Alan Sewell
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I can understand the issues around keeping things simple.
 
Although my layout might look initially complex,
I have looked at many prototype mill layouts,
and have hopefully avoided the switching puzzle (not real life),
or heaven forbid the Timesaver.

All the switching moves are made with the lokey at the Longview end of the cut,
and I have a couple of run rounds to help this if required.

I think this is more likely the way the prototpye would do it.
Simpson's mill in Shelton had some intricate track,
but most moves were simple shoves and pulls out of loading spots.

Good luck with the pre-Christmas plane project.

Regards

Alan


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 Posted: Mon Oct 7th, 2019 11:22 pm
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Reg H
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Alan:

Hmmm. Yes. 
The west end of my layout is patterned (though not a duplicate) on the Time Saver,
as modified in the book "Your Next Model Railroad".

I think it would be fun to model the Simpson mill complex in Shelton,
in somewhat condensed form. 
It would still be huge.

One of my problems is that my interests vary all over the place. 
I still am attracted to a funky backwoods On30 layout. 
I also am intrigued by the Spokane and Inland Empire interurban operation
(think Bill Hegge's Crooked Mountain Lines), as well as GN, NP, BN and SP&S. 
Don't leave out the Puget Sound & Pacific, including as a BN and NP operation.  

Then there is the one-off stuff. 
Have you looked at the layout one guy is doing based on a WWII Pacific Island airstrip? 
I think it is in the large scale section. 
I will look it up.

Reg




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 Posted: Tue Oct 8th, 2019 10:13 am
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Alan Sewell
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Hi Reg

Sorry.
Comments on the Timesaver were not meant as a criticism of using it.
I have a friend who has a exhibition layout based around this,
and it generates much interest at shows.

It was that having spent time studying mill track layouts etc.
using the Timesaver would have seemed wrong for me.

I would love to do a mill based on Shelton (I have all the plans),
but the configuration of my loft is not right.
Perhaps I need a purpose built shed in the garden!!

I understand the lure of different prototypes.
Concentrating on shortlines of the PNW woods does help,
and I am planning some Freemo modules around a pulp mill theme,
so as to use my stock etc.

However I would like to model a sugar mill tramway in HOn30,
and am drawn to New Zealand bush tramways,
and a mining railway based loosely on those in southern Spain and in South America.

I just need lots more space, lots more time AND more money  - really all three!!.
So perhaps I will go back to getting that scenery done AND not get diverted.

Best regards

Alan


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 Posted: Tue Oct 8th, 2019 12:12 pm
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Si.
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Hi Alan  :wave:



Loookin' pretty  C :cool: :cool: L  up in the loft !  :thumb:


Good to see your drawing ^^ done from the chopper !  ;)   (or Cessna ?)


Keep up the modin' & great work.  :2t:



T      I      M      B      E      R      !



:old dude:



Si.




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 Posted: Tue Oct 8th, 2019 05:21 pm
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Reg H
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Alan:

I completely agree. 
The Time Saver does not relate to logging operations in any way I can think of.  
But it sure works well for a cluster of businesses,
that might be found on the edge of a small PNW town. 

I have wanted to build some heavy traction equipment in 1/4" for a long, long time. 
Ever since I first saw Bob Hegge's work in one of the magazines. 
That must be '60's or '70's.
It just never seems to be the right time. 
I have a partially assembled 1/4" LaBelle combine that would make a dandy "trailer",
that I want to complete sometime, even just as a display model. 

Building one of the freight motors typical of the heavy interurbans is a far off goal. 
Plus a bit of track with overhead wires to run it on.  

The interest got re-kindled a year or so ago. 
A business associate moved to a farm near Colfax, WA,
over which runs part of the right-of-way (vacated) of the defunct Spokane & Inland Empire. 
In fact, access to his farm is across an old S&IE howe truss bridge. 
Plus a tunnel across the river from him.  I will dig up a photo. 

The S&IE is an interesting study. 
It ran two different types of power (AC and DC) on different parts of the system. 
The units that ran on the DC had trolley poles, those that ran on the AC had pantographs. 
A few had both. 

They ran your typical interurban passenger "motors" and "trailer",
plus some freight motors (ala Crooked Mountain Lines) and some box motors. 

In it's last days the line was acquired by the GN,
who ran the S&IE equipment re-lettered for the GN. 
It ran through the Palouse region of eastern Washington,
so it was surrounded by beautiful scenery, too.

It would be a very interesting line to model.

I gotta stop this.

Reg




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 Posted: Thu Oct 10th, 2019 02:42 pm
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Ken C
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There was a prototype Timesaver built in 1895 in the mining town of Sandon British Columbia.

Constructed by the (Nakusp & Slocan Rly) aka the Canadian Pacific Railway.


Served the town until the mid 1950's,

when taken out by a flood which destroyed the grade (4.85%) into Sandon.




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