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Michael M
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I have tried to build switches from scratch a number of times without any success.

Stub switches look like they might be easier to build.

And, they would fit in just fine with my two-foot gauge model railway.

Can anyone provide a very simple, easy-to-read, straight forward way to build a stub switch?

pipopak
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Unless regular switches that rely on side pressure against the outside rail for alignment,
stubs have to to be perfectly aligned to work every way.

Take a look here:

http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/1558

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ix8PN9p0mh0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Skra5t_x3rs

Jose.


W C Greene
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Yep, it is more difficult to get stubs working right than "regular" point type switches. I try to have the "moving rails" and the running rails in the switch to be exactly in gauge and line up properly each time I throw the Caboose Hobbies groundthrows-that's all I use. BUT, hard living and other things cause the parts to NOT LINE UP sometimes. I used to not have any problems with correctly adjusted "knob & rod" controls...if I wanted to make mucho work for myself, I'd go back to that way again...but here I am, just have to watch things when the loco crawls across the joint. Thank goodness I have r/c and don't need wiring, stubs require special wiring and a DPDT to control the frog polarity when using old timey power like DC or DCC.

There ain't any tricks, just careful work and being sure the rails all line up properly. Have fun!
Woodie

***Just looking at the videos Jose posted makes me damn glad that my switches ain't wired! And the dude with the expensive under table Tortise machines and the throw bars and adjustable linkages makes me glad that my KISS principle (Caboose throws) does the job!***

Last edited on Sat Jan 20th, 2018 08:33 am by W C Greene

Michael M
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Somewhere in my reading,
it was suggested that a brass wire be soldered on the web of the rails of a stub switch,
to help with lining up everything.

Guess I'll just have to dive in and give it a try.


Woodie,

I'm with you on all that complicated wiring and fooling with switch machines.
I would never consider building a stub switch if I was using DC/DCC.
BPRC is the way to go!
I've been using knob and rod controls for my switches,
but have been playing with some toggle switches to use as turnout controls. 


Bob R
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I love stub switches and personally find them quite easy to set up.

Under the throwbar portion of the turnout I embed a piece of 1/8th ply into the base unless you have a ply subbase already.
To limit the throw I simply drill a small hole and insert a piece of wire at each end of the throwbar carefully aligning the rails.
You can see one in the picture.

The other is under the Caboose Hobbies ground throw.
I use the sprung ground throws.
To keep the rails level I drill and place a piece of wire "squared U shape" over the throwbar.





Michael M
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Bob,

Thanks for the great photos! :2t:

That gives me a good idea of how these stub switches should go together.

Si.
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This photo has been up before ... :cool:





... but hey ! ... here it is again ! :P

&

If a 3-way doesn't get the job done ... L:





... here's Herbs legendary 'funky 4-way' ! :shocked:

Currently owned by one Mr. W. C. Greene :cb: of Big Bend, Texas !!


Now come on Woodie ... :old dude:

... don't hang it on the wall for another couple of years ...

... get some ballast round that sucker & haul some primo ore over it !! ;)



L:



Si.

Michael M
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First stub switch.

Still need to get it installed on the layout.


Si.
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Hi Michael :mex:



:bow: :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow:



Looks good & of course NO WIRING ! to do. ;)



Seems like you've gone for about a 5mm throw, from the pix. L:

You're not using 'Caboose Industries' ground-throws, are you ? ???

You got your own under-board rod-system, right ? :brill:


:pimp:


PIMP MY POINTWORK !

Oh ... WHOOPS ... I forgot ... There ARE NO POINTS ! :shocked:



:moose:



Si.

Michael M
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Si,

Not having to worry about wiring this thing made my life much easier.

I took a piece of paper, laid it over a straight piece of Atlas track and rubbed the top of the rails with a pencil.
Then I took a 22" radius section, lined it up, and rubbed the top of the rails.
This gave me a layout of where the rails and frog would go.

I was planning on using a different switch control for this stub.
I still need to solder on some short pieces of round brass to the outside rails of the switch,
to limit the travel and make the rails line up nicely.

I picked up some mini toggle switches (eBay package of five for about $1).
I'll slip a short piece of brass tube over the toggle, flatten the top end, epoxy the thing on,
then drill a small hole at the top to insert the control wire.
The toggle switch will get buried with just the very top showing.
So, when I need to change the route of the stub turnout, I just have to flip my switch.

Sounds good, right?

I'll see how it turns out.


Si.
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" Sounds good, right?  I'll see how it turns out "



Hi Michael :mex:



Sounds good to me ! ... Looks like it's turned out good as well !!

It's cool on your layout extension. :cool:



22" huh ... Or Eh! ( as they say in the GNW ) ;)





I have some 'Hornby' OO/HO track-pieces stashed, straights & Radius-2 sections.

Eventual track making parts. :slow:



Also have some 3 x 5mm ...

... or 1/8" x 3/16" ( depending on your point of view ) for ties.

The 1/8" thickness is good ...

... since DOUBLED UP copper-clad PCB ties are 1.6mm or 1/16" thick.

Just glue a pair together to get the right height.

Mmm ...



:cool:



Si.



I didn't know that the Festiniog Railway in Wales had stub-switches ...

... until I saw some the other day.





:old dude:

Michael M
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I figured that 22" radius would handle most any equipment.

Using the Snap Track just makes life easier when laying things out.

I was going to use 1/8" basswood for ties but it just looked too small.  Gonna try 3/16" and see how it turn out.

Michael M
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Here's two stub switches installed on the Salt Flats extension.
The first switch leads to Manly Siding, and the second heads off to the borax ore loading bin.

I tried using 3/16" thick basswood for ties and they just looked too bulky.
So I changed to 1/8" material by 3/16" wide.
That gives me ties that are about 4.5" x 6.75"
Close enough.
I have some 1/8" square ties that I just use to fill in.

The story is as the years went by the railroad got cheap and used the bare minimum for replacement ties.


Si.
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" Also have some 3 x 5mm ...
... or 1/8" x 3/16" ( depending on your point of view ) for ties.
The 1/8" thickness is good ...
... since DOUBLED UP copper-clad PCB ties are 1.6mm or 1/16" thick.
Just glue a pair together to get the right height "



Hi Michael :wave:



3mm x 5mm ... or ... 1/8" x 3/16" is pretty handy ...

... since 2x 1.6mm P.C.B. strip ties, one on top of each other, = 1/8" !!  :bg:



Dead easy size to source as well.

Can't go wrong.  :P



Not a bad match for ( O-16.5 )  PECO 'Crazy Track' height either.  :)



Lookin'  G :cool: :cool: D  !

Nice switches.



:mex:



Si.



What size/type of rail are you using Michael ? ???


Michael M
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Getting better and faster at making these stub switches.

It measures out to about a number 5.2 turnout.

I've been using Code 100 brass rail for the switches and my hand laid track.

Brass rail is cheap (nobody wants it), solders well, and being outside weathers really nice.


Si.
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Hi Michael  :mex:



Go on !

You know you want to !!   ...   ;)












:pimp:   :pimp:   :pimp:



Si.


Annoying isn't it.  :old dude:

You ONLY get 1 extra track ... But HAVE to make 2 extra frogs !!  :f:   :f:


Michael M
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Si,

I've thought about doing a 3-way stub but I'm concerned about getting the lead track to line up correctly.

I just might give it a shot when I start working on the Sundance section since it will have several spurs and a runaround track.

Bob R
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Aligning the outer two can be done just like you are currently doing it.
The only difficult one would be the center track.
While not very prototypical, one method would be to "lock" the center position with a pin.
I am sure it could be disguised.
Picture is not a three way but the pin method shows.
On this turnout pins are used to manually lock the turnout in both directions.
This could be done for all three on a three way turnout.
Just drill a hole through the throw bar into the baseboard for each position.
Simple but effective.





Michael M
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Bob,

Great looking track.

I was thinking that if you took a sliding rod or pin at a 90 degree angle to the switch throw rod,
drill 3 holes in that throw rod so that the lead track lines up correctly,
you should be able to move the throw rod on the lead track and lock it into position.

Something to think about.


Bob R
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Sure.
Could also be a "knife" switch type lever that laid in a slot on the throw bar.
That would be easier to align.


Michael M
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Been working on these throws for stub switches.
I felt the brown one in back was too large, so I made one a little smaller.
Works kinda like a Harp Switch Stand.
Thinking that with a little modification it would work on a 3-way stub.


Si.
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Hi Michael  :brill:



E=MC2 !

How are the new 'harps' ? ... They sound good !  :doh:



Any ideas on the 'Michael M Inc.' (patented) 3-way latching mods. ?  ???



:mex:



Si.


Michael M
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I'm thinking that a strip of styrene on top of the stand with three notches for left-center-right to lock the throw into position.

Of course I need to build a three-way stub switch first to find out if it works.

Been busy building regular stubs and getting track laid on the Salt Flats/Manly Siding section.

And, need to plan out a building for Si's Salt, along with a couple of boxcars to haul the salt.


Michael M
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Bob R
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Some think me crazy - others just cheap, but I would say don't over engineer the switch stands.
Your prototypes look pretty stout.
I made some out of card stock and wood!

The angles at bottom and the oval tops with notches are card stock.
The uprights are basswood.
The pivot is on a straight pin and throw bar is brass wire.
After adding thin CA to harden them they are pretty sturdy.
Card stock is so easy to work with.

I agree with adding notches to lock in position.
The pivot pin could be in a slot allowing you to lift handle move and press back down into notches.

Attached is a picture of one of mine.
Only fiddly part is determining the distance between pivot pin and throw bar point so that the throw is correct for track movement.





Michael M
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Bob,

Very nice switch stand, and nice switches too!

My concern in  using your construction materials is how well it would hold up in the great outdoors.

So far the styrene is holding up fine.  I know it looks very basic, but it works.

Using brass may be an option.

Bob R
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Could be made out of plastic.  Just a little more difficult to cut out.


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