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O Scale Vehicles ?
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 Posted: Wed Feb 14th, 2018 04:27 am
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Lee B
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On my layout it's always the summer of 1943. That means few civilian vehicles and the military ones all have stateside early markings...
the civilian ones all have correct county/year markings on the license plates, too.






I need to get some better shots of some of the others eventually. I rotate the civilian ones through the layout from time to time, but the Army vehicles usually stay on the layout in various localles.



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 Posted: Wed Feb 14th, 2018 06:42 pm
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Steven B
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These are very important details that many vehicles lack on a MRR.  We have a kerosene reservoir next to our house, yes it was built before electricity was here, where the people who lived here in the late 1960s and early 70s threw their old plates when they got their new ones each year.  So we now have a collection of VA plates.  So, my point, plates alone can and did in the way back dictate a date on your railroad.  Good job Lee.



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 Posted: Wed Feb 14th, 2018 08:54 pm
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Lee B
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Steven B wrote: These are very important details that many vehicles lack on a MRR.  We have a kerosene reservoir next to our house, yes it was built before electricity was here, where the people who lived here in the late 1960s and early 70s threw their old plates when they got their new ones each year.  So we now have a collection of VA plates.  So, my point, plates alone can and did in the way back dictate a date on your railroad.  Good job Lee.

Thanks, Steven!
More shot I got last night:







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 Posted: Wed Mar 28th, 2018 01:33 am
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Bob D
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Your posts made me wonder what the states did during the war, so I Googled it

WW2 STATES LICENSE PLATES

I read where they changed from steel to aluminum, and even to a cardboard/soybean mix :shocked:



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 Posted: Wed Mar 28th, 2018 03:00 am
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Lee B
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Bob D wrote: Your posts made me wonder what the states did during the war, so I Googled it



WW2 STATES LICENSE PLATES



I read where they changed from steel to aluminum, and even to a cardboard/soybean mix :shocked:



Many states (including Tennessee, where I model) just let drivers use the 42 plates for the duration. They'd issue either small year tabs to screw onto a corner, or issue a sticker for the windshield. TN has a small black shape with a white "A" for 1943 to the lower left corner. I have no clue why that letter. Other states used the last two digits for the year. CA, I think, used a "V" (for victory) metal tab which I always thought was pretty cool.
1943 is missing from many state plate collections as not being made at all or were made in extremely small numbers. For example, I know that WA state plates from 1943 are worth more than the cars you could bolt one to, for some collectors (they were only made for busses and commercial vehicles, so only a few hundred were made total). a pal of mine found one in a barn in Montana years ago, and sold it for several thousand dollars.
It's amazing how much model railroading can teach you once you start looking to get a small detail right. But in my case, I have a 1944 Jeep, so I had already researched wartime license plates. I have 1942 plates on mine, as my state allows you to register antique vehicles with original plates for the production year (they allow all WW2-year vehicles to be registered as 1942s, so you can get original plates for them, good luck finding a 43 or 44 plate!).



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 Posted: Wed Mar 28th, 2018 05:45 am
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Bob D
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Lee, I wonder if the letters were used as part of the rationing effort?
With all the metal, rubber, fuel, etc going towards the war effort it’s surprising any private vehicles were allowed.  I used to have a couple of ration books that my mom saved, but have no idea where they are now.



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 Posted: Wed Mar 28th, 2018 07:20 pm
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Lee B
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Bob D wrote: I wonder if the letters were used as part of the rationing effort?












With all the metal, rubber, fuel, etc going towards the war effort it’s surprising any private vehicles were allowed.  I used to have a couple of ration books that my mom saved, but have no idea where they are now.












I don't think the plate markings had anything to do with gas ration ratings as they varied by state and the gas ration sticker types were nationwide.



You could own a civilian car during WW2; the government wasn't seizing them. In May of 1942, the U.S. Office of Price Administration (OPA) rationed gasoline on the east coast, then nationwide that December to assist in the war effort. Gas rationing had different classifications, noted by the stickers that had to be on the windshield of every car on the road:




  • The “A” sticker was the most common and was issued to the general public. To get the sticker, you had to certify that you needed gasoline and that you owned no more than 5 tires, which were also rationed during the war.

  • The “B” sticker was issued to business owners. It allowed them to get more fuel for their business vehicles.

  • The "C" sticker was issued primarily to professional people such as medical, clergy and construction or maintenance workers. The “C” sticker had a list of 17 different occupations and check boxes at the bottom of the form that the person had to check off to qualify for the sticker. The “C” sticker was probably the most common one used during the war, as many people tried to qualify to get more gasoline. However, after the war, most “C” sticker users scraped them off their windshields, as they didn't want everyone to know they’d gotten more gas than the “A card” holders during the war.



  • The "M" sticker was issued to motorcycle owners. This included telegraph delivery and other messenger services who used motorcycles for their business and usually had to prove a business case for that.



  • The "T" sticker was issued to commercial truck drivers.

  • The "X" sticker was issued in special instances for high mileage type jobs such as traveling salesmen, people in government or the defense industries.

Last edited on Thu Mar 29th, 2018 08:06 pm by Lee B



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 Posted: Thu Mar 29th, 2018 03:52 am
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Bob D
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Thanks Lee,cool stuff to know!



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