Freerails Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register

Freerails IS ACCEPTING new Members ... To join Freerails ... See how to Register as a Member in the 'Joining Freerails' Forum

Weathering Hand Laid Track
 Moderated by: W C Greene
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Sun May 20th, 2018 06:59 pm
  PMQuoteReply
1st Post
Tom Ward
Registered
 

Joined: Tue Nov 14th, 2017
Location: St Augustine, Florida USA
Posts: 115
Status: 
Offline
I'm just getting started laying track by hand on my On30 layout.
I'm using Fast Tracks for the switches but everything else will be hand laid.

I have several questions:

1)  Is it worth the effort to add wood grain to the upper surface of the ties?

2)  I was planning to stain all the ties before gluing them down.
I've seen some videos where the ties get glued down first and then stained,
but they were in HO scale and the ties were closer together.
Any thoughts?

3)  I'm using ME code 70 non-weathered rail.
Would it be best to paint the rail before spiking it down?

This is a dead rail layout, so wiring and power are not an issue.

- Tom


Back To Top

 Posted: Mon May 21st, 2018 02:37 am
  PMQuoteReply
2nd Post
Michael M
Registered


Joined: Thu Jan 26th, 2017
Location: San Bernardino, California USA
Posts: 845
Status: 
Online
 
Tom,

On my layout (35n2) I started with flex track which I spray painted after tacking it down.
Now that I've starting handlaying and building my own switches I wait until the rails are down before staining the ties.
I kinda slop it on with an old paint brush.
Most of it will get buried in ballast or dirt anyway so I don't worry too much about it.
I use brass rail which tarnishes fairly quickly.

Bob does some great work with his ties and rails which I really admire.
Maybe he can share a few tips.







____________________
Michael
-------
Nye, Inyo & Esmeralda Railroad
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon May 21st, 2018 10:25 am
  PMQuoteReply
3rd Post
Tom Ward
Registered
 

Joined: Tue Nov 14th, 2017
Location: St Augustine, Florida USA
Posts: 115
Status: 
Offline
Michael - thanks for the info.

It looks like your technique works well.
Apparently it's worth the effort to weather the ties.
That looks really awesome and it does show.
How do you tarnish the rails?
BTW, your turnouts are very cool.

I just started yesterday and so far have scribed grain and sanded enough ties to do 10' of track and 3 turnouts.
I'll try your technique and see how it turns out.
I'm using my test/puzzle track to develop my hand laid skills before I take on the layout.

- Tom


Back To Top

 Posted: Mon May 21st, 2018 02:13 pm
  PMQuoteReply
4th Post
Michael M
Registered


Joined: Thu Jan 26th, 2017
Location: San Bernardino, California USA
Posts: 845
Status: 
Online
Tom,

That's not mine.
Belongs to Bob R.
He does some fantastic work with his rails and ties.




____________________
Michael
-------
Nye, Inyo & Esmeralda Railroad
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon May 21st, 2018 11:20 pm
  PMQuoteReply
5th Post
Bob R
Registered


Joined: Thu Nov 20th, 2014
Location: Papillion, Nebraska USA
Posts: 387
Status: 
Offline
Really quite simple.
I use balsa for ties as it is soft before finishing.
I scrape the full length of a strip of balsa and then cut into tie lengths.
I use an exacto to further distress the ends for splits etc.
I glue them down with white glue.
After the glue has set I paint them with artists acrylic raw umber.
Then dry brushed with white.
Rails are glued in place with Walthers Goo (contact cement).
I add spikes but mostly for appearance only.
Rail sides are painted with Model Master acrylic Rust.
Finally rails are dry brushed with raw sienna.
I find that after paint and ballast glue etc the balsa ties are plenty strong.


Attachment: IMG_0356 (2).JPG (Downloaded 76 times)



____________________
Bob
Back To Top

 Posted: Wed May 23rd, 2018 10:56 am
  PMQuoteReply
6th Post
Tom Ward
Registered
 

Joined: Tue Nov 14th, 2017
Location: St Augustine, Florida USA
Posts: 115
Status: 
Offline
Bob,Thank you.

Your results are excellent!
I appreciate the info and will give it a try on mine.
I'm using sugar pine for my ties but they still show some detail without too much effort.
I really like the results you get with the X-acto blade on the ends.
Nice detail.
The stain and paint info is helpful too.

- Tom


Back To Top

 Posted: Sun May 27th, 2018 07:26 pm
  PMQuoteReply
7th Post
Tom Ward
Registered
 

Joined: Tue Nov 14th, 2017
Location: St Augustine, Florida USA
Posts: 115
Status: 
Offline
OK, here's my plan.


I've got 4 curved, 4 wyes and 16 #5 straight turnouts built which is enough to get me up and running on the benchwork I've completed so far.


I'm scribing wood grain into all the wood ties, including about 300 ties for track in between the turnouts.
I'm scribing it using an old Xacto style saw blade for fine grain,
and then going back over it with a short section of hack saw blade to give some deeper grain.
After I scribe it I give everything a light sanding with 220 grit paper that's probably actually 800 grit,
because I've been using the same piece for about 2 years now.


With that done I place the ties in bags, separated by turnout style or plain cross ties.
I've mixed up a batch of fresh stain:
40 oz water, 4 tsp raw umber acrylic, 2 tsp burnt umber acrylic, 1 tsp black acrylic, 2 tsp black drawing ink that's water soluble.
I soak the ties for 24 hours, turning the pieces in each bag every few hours.
When I take them out I pour off the remaining stain back into my stain jug and can get many more uses from it.
My last batch lasted two years and would have been longer but it was getting kinda ripe.


I got this recipe from Rusty Stumps and it works great.
I've used it for all my models over the last few years and am really pleased with the aged effect for the wood.
Each piece has enough variety of color that it gives a very realistic appearance.
I think it'll work fine for the ties too.


With the ties weathered and stained I'll glue them down with Elmer's white glue and spike the rails down.
My roadbed is 1/2" Homasote and I'm using ME spikes.
I think I'll try the ME rail weathering solution.
I have some of their weathered rail on my turntable and that looks....... well, kinda weathered.


If I'm truly unhappy with my weathering job I'll just bury the ties a little deeper.


- Tom


Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jun 4th, 2018 10:15 am
  PMQuoteReply
8th Post
Si.
Moderator


Joined: Thu Feb 23rd, 2012
Location: London
Posts: 4286
Status: 
Offline
Hi Tom  :wave:


Sounds like a GREAT plan for the ties.  :old dude:

Is it working out ?  ???



I have all sorts of 'Artists' paints, in both oil, acrylic & watercolour.  [whack]



But I mainly habitually buy 'Humbrol' Enamel paints.

Probably got addicted to the fumes when I was 10 !  ;)



A recent 'top-tip' I got, for a NICE 'straight outta the pot' rusty-iron-raily type of colour ...

... strangely enough ...

... was the 'Humbrol' Enamel colour 'LEATHER', which is a kinda old looking brown/rust hue.



Saw it used on some seriously RUSTED steelworks wagons.

It looked really ... Erm ... Well ... RUSTY !  :P



The 'Humbrol' has really DENSE PIGMENT ...

... which can help stop the 'metal-shine' from showing through, even after just ONE coat.  :thumb:



:moose:



Si.




____________________

' Mysterious Moose Mountain ' - 1:35n2 - pt.II
http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=7318&forum_id=17&page=1

' M:R:W Motor Speedway !!! ' - 1:32 Slotcar Racing Layout
http://www.slotforum.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=59295&st=0&a
Back To Top


 Current time is 05:02 pm

Top



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems