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Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Hi all.


SCALE/GAUGE
1n20E                  
(E = elastic = basically a mix of 1/32, 1/35 and 9mm scales but accepting all kind of refugees from every other scale/gauge.)


SETTING
The place is "ÎLE DU PRÉSENT" ('Island of the NOW'), an imaginary French island in a vague, also elastic, period somewhere between 1880 and 1950 where no war has ever taken place.


APPROACH
None. I make plans only to provoke the Muses. When they come and see my sketches they smile and from that moment I silently obey. So I rarely know what I am going to do or even what I am doing but can talk a lot about afterwards. I rarely decide. I mostly simply follow.


CONCEPT 
The now 2'8" X 10' 'layout' started as a 2'8" X 2' diorama (now the left end of the layout) and when that had taken some shape the next 2'8" X 2'8" section followed in an organic way around something I had been wanting to do since two layouts ago when building "PONDÉZAR": a floating market. (Something that came to me suggested by fellows from an old forum.) The same organic way, other two 2'8"X 2'8" sections came up. There has never been anything as a track plan. Until recently the only track was an a little sinuous passing one. A bit as a crude justification for the whole modeling joy. But while making the last section the muses warned me about the possibility of the whole layout going to end in a corner so a 90 degree curve toward the front edge was advisable so a Peco switch (o.k.: turnout) came to be...So the radical concept is: 'No plans. Just keep going with the flow and enjoy.'
At this point I've got bored by my own bla-bla-bla so it's time to show some photos.
(Keep in mind that none of the buildings is glued in place and no details have been added yet. Even more: every single building is going to get serious color work and most some will undergo more or less seripous modifications. The trees and the rest of the greenery is just at a sketch stage so probably most of the things will be quiet different soon. Above that, none of the sections has reached a stage of completion.)
It would take too many pages to show the whole story and since what matters is the now let's start from the current stage. This was the abrupt end of the third section where the new one was going to start.















And the following are images of the new section.



















More photos in a moment (if this post succeeds).
Daniel



Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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and a variation with some spray paint and 2mm static grass.







Next is the first intent of a small ferry







but the space compromise was too unprototypical (...!!!)
and I am making a radical modification in the area and a new ferry using the same sides:















Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Yes, I know the rail must be moved to it's place. It will.







































Larry G
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Dan, I am impressed.

Your modeling style is wonderful, so interesting to explore.

Larry Gant


Lee B
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Je suis très impressionné. Excellent travail de modèle!

Or for your native language:

Ik ben erg onder de indruk. Uitstekend model werk!

I've been to the Netherlands when I was younger and was just in France in May.

I love your model work!


Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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May be a bit of a retrospective will give a better idea of the whole (...if you manage to unravel the chaos of my ... order.)

The bakery is a survivor from my now chopped "PONDEZAR"







Also de book shop at the side street is a survivor from "PONDEZAR" but is undergoing a serious rebuilding.
Still, it will keeps it's name: "LIVRES COMME LE VENT"



























Next is the steamboat dock with behind the ferry dock that has now been chopped for making a broader one











Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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and that was it for today.

Daniel



Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Thank you, Larry. You are very kind.

Actually I owe the huge stream of inspiration to Woodie Green, whose unforgetable "Mogollon Ry" still fascinates me and moved me to 1/32

Daniel


Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Lee:
Thank you for your kind words.
Bagette, Camembert, Paturain, Bujolais Nuveau!!!  :boogie:
(That is all my French. The French names for my layouts were given to me  by French friends! Sorry!!!)

And about Dutch: well it's my daily language but I am Argentine so my native language must be -probably- Spanish ...

But I manage to understand your French words clearly and of course also your perfect Dutch.

I came to the Netherlands as a refugee almost forty years ago.
My kids grew up here and here I studied and worked.
My grandchildren were born here too so my roots have learnt to be where I am.   :old dude:

Daniel


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What a wonderful layout !

Congrats.



Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Thank you, Chris.

Nice to know you enjoy it.


:-)


Daniel

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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I see now you are in France.

Modeling and in France makes you probably familiar with Delcampe's website where I have been finding most of the historical information for creating my own scene.

But in case you don't know it or others have any interest, Delcampe offers an amazing stock of old postcards from all over the world and they allow the images to be shared.

Just in case, here the link:

https://www.delcampe.net/fr/collections/search?slug=cartes-postales/france/colombes&categories%5B0%5D=713

I would be very pleased to see some of your work.

Daniel


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Hello Daniel,

Thanks for the link.
Very interesting.

In model railroading we don't play in the same league.
You're a real model railroader...not me.
I'm just playin' with my trains and nothing else.


Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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(Pst! Chris: don't tell the others but I am not a model railroader.

My interest on trains is merely aesthetic and I use them as an excuse to do what I like the most which I would call "3D lying"
-yes, no typing error- .':us:' .

That explains why in a 10' X 2'8"layout there is only one track and one turnout.
But if I manage to get the RC stuff installed in my locos that may change a little bit. L: )


Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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The building at the pier is a bike repair shop survivor from "PONDÉZAR" and won't be in that place.
I just wanted to see how a building would look in that place.



































































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Next is a kind of 'unreal unreality'.
The line of houses at the back are remains of the now chpped "ROCHEFORT".
They never were more than a row of false fronts at the backdrop but I like to play and these photos were a funny moment



























Next is some of the stuff I have been preparing every now and then for the coming floating market











Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Back to the island



































































































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That was it for now.

Daniel



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:apl:     :apl:     :apl:     :apl:     :apl:     :apl:




Lee B
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Daniel Osvaldo Caso wrote: 
Lee:

Thank you for your kind words.

Bagette, Camembert, Paturain, Bujolais Nuveau!!!  :boogie:

(That is all my French. The French names for my layouts were given to me  by French friends! Sorry!!!)


Daniel,

My French is very poor, as I took German in college (but have not used in in many years).
I must admit my Dutch needs a lot of work as well as it's been a VERY long time since I've needed that.

But as for your scenes,
my wife and I were in France in May and your riverside scenes especially remind me very much of a very nice afternoon we spent in Bayeux
(and had the best crepes ever).
It is a very accurate representation!


Larry G
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Love your trees.

Any chance you could reveal how you make them?
What materials do you use?

Larry Gant



Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Thank you, Chris.
It's really nice to know you like it. :2t:

Daniel


Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Lee:

But you must have been here for decades!
Learning Dutch and after a long time not using it still being able to write it as you do is really something.

The Dutch language is really a headache... Correction: a lot of headaches to learn.
But once one can use it, it has as all other languages a very unique beauty impossible to translate.

I wish my Dutch was better than my English but is more or less even poor.
Not really a problem because I have nothing essential to add to what have been already said in this world. :us:


Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Lee:

Regarding my scenes: well, my eyes have paid hard for my ignorance and the times when I was able to model N scale are gone.
Same regarding HO and 0 scales.
I have been balancing at the boundaries between 1/32 and next bigger scale and I am used to refer to myself as Mr. Magoo.

( L: ... Wait, Daniel: these people are going to think you are a caricature of Justice: half blind, half deaf and with nothing to say ...!!! :) )

Daniel


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Wow!

I'm at a loss for words.
Clearly, this is a passion for you.
I've never seen any better modeling in my life.



Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Thank you, Larry.

There are two groups or more of trees in the layout, none of which -as everything you can see in the photos- is complete yet.

One group that I will elaborate properly once the landscaping and buildings are done are the weeping willow.
I have found an appropriate material and did a bit of and experimented twice with an acceptable result,
but none of the trees reached completion yet.

The other group are other types of willows too and my experiments were a bit more extended but none have reached really completion yet.

They all have had a hard life first at "PONDÉZAR" then at "ROCHEFORT" and now on the island,
but probably their hardest period have been on the shelves.
Plenty of twigs are broken
(absolutely my fault and those who know me and how and where I work know what I mean)
or gone so all trees need repairs + completion.

The materials I use are all from ER Decor, a Belgian firm who are the only source I know.
If you happen to order from them, you can contact Roni Eggermont (the owner) and he will arrange the posting:
https://www.er-decor.be/en/?pagina=news

Here's the link to the catalogue:
https://www.er-decor.be/en/pdf/2014-02-05%20%20ER.Cat%202014%20ENGLISCH.pdf

I don't know if he still has the twigs I use for the weeping willows.
They are #ER.2083 and you can find them in page 4 of the catalogue.
When I bought mine he said he was going to discontinue it but that was about four years ago and he may have them again.

The other twigs are also on page 4 in the catalogue and are #ER.2070 and #ER.2072.

Regarding your desire to read/see a 'how to' it will be pleased but you must have patience so it happens in the right moment.  :old dude:

Daniel


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Daniel Osvaldo Caso wrote: Lee:
But you must have been here for decades!
Learning Dutch and after a long time not using it still being able to write it as you do is really something.


Actually I was only there for a month, just a little over 30 years ago.
I've been reading about the language ever since, foolishly thinking I was going to get back 'soon' but so far, never have.
I got back to Europe last month, but never got anywhere in the area, sadly.


mwiz64 wrote:
Wow!

I'm at a loss for words.
Clearly, this is a passion for you.
I've never seen any better modeling in my life.


I agree, Daniel's work is nothing short of amazing.
Having just been to France, I can far better appreciate his accurate representation of the French landscape and towns.


Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Mike:

Thank you for your very kind words.
I really mean that because they convey very well and in a powerful way the purity of a spontaneous reaction.
But you make me blush as when my mother came into the room and found me wearing my dad's for me huge rain coat and hat,
when I was still four years old! :P

Daniel


Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Lee

You wrote:
"Actually I was only there for a month, just a little over 30 years ago.
I've been reading about the language ever since, foolishly thinking I was going to get back 'soon' but so far, never have.
I got back to Europe last month, but never got anywhere in the area, sadly."

I fully understand your feeling.
I probably got the opposite: I came here hoping to stay for a year or -at it's most- year and a half and get back to Argentina...
That was 1979 but I am still here with still growing roots.:us:

Daniel


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Daniel,
What a delightful display.
Your efforts are always appreciated by me. 
Darryl Huffman

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Hi Darryl

Thank you for those words.
I must say the same for your extensive work through so many years.
Great to know you enjoyed it.
:2t:

Daniel

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Wow.  :hyp:

Is this 1/35?   Simply OUTSTANDING!

(Well duh, I just went back to page 1 and see that it is 32-35.) 

Read all the words.  :apl: 



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Thank you, Steven.
I call it 1/32E and the E is for Elastic.

I use whatever fits the scene and don't care from which scale it comes from.
For example many windows and railings are H0 or 0 scale.
Others are 1/1 scale as this rubberized horse hair and leaves:







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Larry

Here's something you'll probably like.

I try to do some biking every day and experience has loaded my small bag with a couple of empty plastic bags and cutting pliers because nature is an amazing source of modeling materials.

The leaves you see in the photo of the previous message are from a plant -no idea of it's name- that grows just everywhere along the water here











It is really very easy to pull away all the tiny leaves with just one movement of the fingers and by this time of the year they are available in all variations from fresh green to dark dry brown.

Even the twigs provide very interesting material because they are extremely strong and flexible but also very thin and that makes a good material for, for example, woven or other types of fences.











Another material that I really love are plant's roots:











A bit of spray glue on such an armature and some leaves spread by hand on it makes great easy work.















and such greenery helps a lot to create a good atmosphere in many places











Of course, also the cold months have their beauty







Next is a different type of tree armature.
You notice it is more open and less 'intense'







and you will get one for free every time you eat some grapes.

Just to be clear: all of this is totally new stuff for me and the photos including the one with the rubberized horse hair are all of first try.
But I am sure a bit of happy playing will provide plenty of interesting stuff.

Oh, yes, those nice green leaves will fade and die in a couple of days.
But today the ordered Glycerine will arrive so I will be drying a stock of leaves in the microwave and giving them a two days bath in glycerine before letting them dry for a week or two.
That way they will keep their nice colors for many, many years and also their flexibility.

Have all a nice GOOD day.

Daniel


Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Couldn't avoid playing a bit more with those nice leaves, so painted in two tones of green a full twig (the long vertical dark one)







Here a little tree







and spread some as fallen leaves at the market area











Here something else: a a bit (not much) better photo of the tomato variation







Here no leaves at all but the beauty of a dead tree ( a piece of old roots from ...no idea)

Daniel


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Good to see you posting again Daniel and looking forward to the next installment.

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Hi Doug! :wave:

Thank you, Doug.

Yes I am trying to see if I can build my 'pied à terre' here and you know when I focus on one forum the rest vanish for me.

Don't worry, the stream will keep bringing plenty of news.


Daniel

Larry G
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Daniel, thank you for the hints to use nature for tree materials.
I live in a some what arid area so we have different types of wild plants.
I am confident that something will be usable, if I can only use my imagination well enough.

Larry Gant



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THE GLYCERINE ARRIVED!!!

And of course the already drying leaves may wait ...







...but the green ones doesn't because they MUST stay green:







The green soup doesn't seem much, but there are a dozen tree armatures submerged and leaves enough for the whole year.
Just I couldn't remember how long and how warm should they stay into the microwaves so what I did?
Of course!: I simply skipped the microwave.
The result will be visible in a few days but I think once dried it all will remain green for a couple of years and then slowly fade away.
And that is o.k. for me because by then I will be modeling a fall scene... :Crazy:


Daniel


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Larry
My pleasure.

It doesn't matter in what type of area you live, there is always at least some nature.
The point is not to hold an idea in mind, but to really pay attention to the nature before your nose and learn it's specific language there.

Arid zones swowish greens but more of the silver or gray ones.
Also more thorns which you can model with very short static grass, without need of an applicator: just spraying a bit of glue on the plants and spreading a little of the clear grass with your fingers.

Also the terrain may tend to show more sandy and yellowish or redish depending on the region...

One of the main things is that in arid areas the weathering shows a very different spectrum of colors than a humid one: wood tends to turn gray or redish and every color seems to be playing with silver...

Iron rust tends to give in arid areas the most beautiful range of browns from almost black to pink, yellow and even red...

Well, all the above is not what you 'should' do, because are only ideas from someone's mind who never lived in an arid area, but may help to smile a bit once you start studying the real thing.

The less you think while looking the more you see.[toast]



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I forgot I've found yesterday also another source for super-delicate beautiful leaves/twigs











Daniel


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Simply outstanding...I am damn glad to see your work and words again old friend. Maybe now I will revive my poor junque. If I could just remember where I put my camera...Hmmm.....

Woodie

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Thank you, dear friend.

Great that you like your disciple's work!!!

But beware:

I still remember when you kicked my ass to get me modelling,

so I have the right to do the same to you if you don't wake up and get back to your workbench and camera!!!


Daniel


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I LOVE the trees!

Great detail of putting dead leaves underneath everything, as that is a detail so many people forget to include.



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Thank you, Lee.

You know how it works: you bring the material to the scene and they start telling you what to do.

It works great at least as long as our silly mind doesn't start 'thinking' and wanting to lead.:us:



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Danial, This summer, you would never know we are arid. The prairie and mountain sides are all very green. We have been getting a lot of much needed rain. Not much farming in my area (not enough reliable rains) but there is a lot of cattle ranching. Prairie grass, evergreen trees and weeds seem to enjoy the normally sparse rain fall.

What we lack in vegetation is made up with spectacular rock formations and pine forests.

Larry G

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Larry

That sounds very interesting. What I don't 7understand is what are you waiting to post here some photos of it. Will you?
Please?

Daniel

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Dan,  here are a few photos of where I live. I don't know how to post more than one photo at a time, so here they are one at a time.
You may know of this one. It's Mt. Rushmore, only 45min from my home. I do not know who made this image, found on line.
Larry

Attachment: mt_rushmore_10-29-14.jpg (Downloaded 54 times)

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This one shows the immense size of many rock outcroppings here in the Black Hills. Yes, that is a highway you see, not a walking trail.   Larry

Attachment: e0d517413f7633d37a7b9a9e5de4dd2d.jpg (Downloaded 53 times)

Larry G
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This is a cliff in the city of Deadwood, 30 miles from my home.  Larry

Attachment: DSC00381.jpg (Downloaded 52 times)

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A photo of the Needles Highway scenery, About one hour from my home. Pic found on the net. no idea who made it.LG

Attachment: 9-Needles-200x300.jpg (Downloaded 51 times)

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My wife on a walking trail between two very large rock outcroppings, with fallen boulders jammed in between them.  LG

Attachment: DSC00451.jpg (Downloaded 49 times)

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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WOW...!!!


WOW...!!!


Not an area where one could get bored easily... Certainly not if one likes modeling...!

I wouldn't like to live where those famous stone people looking into my yard all the time but the rest... must be fabulous... :2t:



Thank you for sharing, Larry.


Daniel

Larry G
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A walking trail during a normal summer, a few years ago.  LG

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Larry G
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Some of our scenery is underground, many large caves here in the Black Hills. Photo found on line.     LG

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Larry G
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We do have water here, in the form of creeks feed by underground springs.  LG

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And, lastly, The Badlands National Park just 60 miles from home. My wife and I spent the day there yesterday. The temp was close to 100 f.  Larry Gant

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Larry G
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Dan, If you would like to see how I model the Black Hills on my Gn15 layout, check out APPETITE MINE here on Freerails.  Larry G

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Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Amazing!

I never been in a cave but one day I'll visit some.

Beautiful.

Thank you Larry.

Daniel

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Thank you again, Larry.

Your post with your Gn15 layout came just after I posted my previous answer.
I am going to take a look tonight, after my approaching dinner.But the above photo is very promising already.

Daniel

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Yes, Larry builds wonderful things! And in large scale!
Daniel, glad to see you again here. I am inspired to get the camera out and send some pix myself.

Woodie

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Woodie

Yes. I have just enjoyed all 38 pages of Larry's work.(..and picked up some good ideas).

Of course you are glad to see me here and of course you get inspired. It is always round: one get what one gives and you are now getting back from me the amazing load of insipiration I got from you through the years.
Enjoy, but don't forget to pick up the camera!!!


Daniel

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Daniel, thank you for the kind words reguarding my modeling efforts. The architectural style you are modeling would look out of place on my layout. The closest things we have, here in the Black Hills, would be the mountain towns of Lead, Central City and Deadwood. They are built on steep slopes requiring many retaining walls and stairways. I will try to build such a town on my layout.

I have already picked up several new ideas from your postings and will steal more ideas from you in the future. Larry G

Last edited on Sat Jun 30th, 2018 01:38 pm by Larry G

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Oh, yes, the nature, the culture and the architecture are quiet different in old France than everywhere else but I don't see any need to compare. I can easily understand that such a nature as I see in your photos must conquer one's hart very soon too.

Feel fre to take from my work whatever may be useful for you.

Daniel

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Good grief! I blink and Daniel shows up and now I have a week’s reading to do!

Amazing stuff Daniel. Take good care of our house, one of these days I will be moving in.

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Larry G wrote: Dan,  here are a few photos of where I live. I don't know how to post more than one photo at a time, so here they are one at a time.
You may know of this one. It's Mt. Rushmore, only 45min from my home. I do not know who made this image, found on line.
Larry
Doug (slateworks) has a statue that was carved by the same guy who carved those big heads in your pic. :thumb:
The folks at Updah Creek had friends in the black hills. They made a deal to have a statue of the town founder sculpted at the studio in South Dakota. Here is being readied for loading and shipment from SD to Updah Creek. 



The statue was crated and then loaded on the flat car. 








The crane was also loaded so the statue could be transferred to the narrow gauge line to Updah and then again unloaded at Updah. You can see the unique counterweight system for the crane. Just drive your truck up onto the back of the crane frame. 


Sorry for the derail Daniel. ;)

Last edited on Sun Jul 1st, 2018 04:19 am by NevadaBlue

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Hi Ken!!!

Sure I'll do.There is going to happen a lot to your house soon.Among other things, the whole fence and the garden must be completed but there is also plenty to do to the building itself. For example the 'wooden' arched double door mock-up must be replaced by a real wood one...There is a full list of jobs waiting to be done there while the K's -lazy people!- spend the day the Mexican way, with their belly staring Nevada's sun!!! :wave:

Daniel

Last edited on Sun Jul 1st, 2018 07:08 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Just now, after posting my previous message, I see the above.

Great to see more of Updah!
Thank you.

And don't worry for the derrailing, it will happen often here as you have seen long ago at "PONDÉZAR".

And now that you mention derailings, I have a sudden urge to clean the island track.
Yesterday soemthing as a radical turning point happened at 'ÎLE DU PRÉSENT': My old friend John Vogelaar came, after a long time not seeing each other, to visit me.
He wanted to see the three half built Couillet locos Pete had made for me long ago.
When the project stopped Pete sent me the three locos only one of which had been already motorized.
I had seen about two years ago a youtube film by Pete where the motorized one was running under RC but, since none of the locos had been completed and the motorized one came without the battery installed, I didn't want to risk burning something so I never tried to run it hoping Martin would complete the RC job some day and I would complete the modeling job.
But yesterday John instaled the battery and, for the first time since the early days of "PONDÉZAR", I saw something running on my layout's track.
He made two short films with his mobile and stored somewhere in my computer believing -poor John- that I would be able to find them for sharing...
Of course I don't so I can't post it here.
But it happened.
Now I have made a new deal: I gave the three uncomplete brass locos to John (even if brass locos are more appealing for most modelers at 'ÎLE DU PRÉSENT' we care more about aesthetics than for materials and also if Pete's locos are beautiful, they miss de fine detail I am getting on the styrene ones using Alan Brack's 3D printed domes, chimneys and lamps and other also 3D printed details from my own 3D drawings).
It may sound heretic but also life is heretic.
So, in exchange for the half built brass locos he will install the RC on the two Couillet and the two Billard diesels.

Having some traction may change the future of 'ÎLE DU PRÉSENT' being the final push to go for the L shaped 20' + 9'4" layout (three times what it is now).

Unable to find yesterday's films, here at least the one made by Pete of the motorized loco:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVAQBAZSPqI

All three identical locos are built on one of the Riv mechanisms of HO Rivarossi 'MEYER' German loco.

And in case you want to see a bit of 'The making of...' here another film by Pete showing the milling of the front cab plates

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfB68CxDUCg


Daniel

W C Greene
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Daniel, concerning the "R/C test", as you found out...an r/c loco can leave the rails and happily run across the scenery. A beautiful (if unfinished & painted) lokie she is. And that track is some of the most realistic I have seen!

Forward
Woodie

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I am glad that John was able to visit finally. Those videos will turn up somehow. John can probably tell you where they are hiding.

HUGE layout coming! I can’t wait to see a sketch of what you are thinking about.

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NevadaBlue wrote:Doug (slateworks) has a statue that was carved by the same guy who carved those big heads in your pic. :thumb:
The folks at Updah Creek had friends in the black hills. They made a deal to have a statue of the town founder sculpted at the studio in South Dakota. Here is being readied for loading and shipment from SD to Updah Creek.
The statue was crated and then loaded on the flat car. 
And here he is, Anywun Updah, his statue commissioned by his son Phineas (Fings) Updah in recognition of his service to the community, being unloaded at Updah's small station.
b (2) by slateworks, on Flickr
Being viewed for the first time by Fings and the townsfolk.
b (6) by slateworks, on Flickr
And erected on his plinth to watch over the town that he founded
c (5) by slateworks, on Flickr

Last edited on Sun Jul 1st, 2018 04:41 pm by slateworks

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Woodie
Well, yes, Pete was doing splendid work but never completed it so those three are now property of John and I am already building two of these:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/daniel_1_32_scale/7783740042/in/album-72157636720169584/
Instead of the tiny 'Pololu' geared motor and also tiny (half hour run) battery these will run an Bull-Ant motor boguies in the tender where there is also a lot of room for much bigger batteries.
I had photos of these under construction locos but are nu unaccessible for me in my old Flickr account.As soon as I get the new (redesigned) tender grames 3D printed I will post photos here.
I have alreadey almost completed one of the two Billard diesels and once done they will getalso the RC thing. The Billards run on the Bachmann closed streetcar mechanisms.
Daniel

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Ken
Yes, yes and yes. 
:glad:
Daniel

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(Pst!!! Doug: Mr. Anywun Updah has a foot in the air and that makes it spooky ...! :hyp: )


Daniel

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Daniel here is the link to your old Flickr account. Maybe you can download photos from the Tortue # 1 album from here. I can see them but I can't download them as downloading is blocked for others.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/daniel_1_32_scale/albums

Last edited on Sun Jul 1st, 2018 05:32 pm by slateworks

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Thank you, Doug.
I'll try once more but I think that was among the 'only for friends photos' and Mr. Caso never added me to his list!!!

Daniel

slateworks
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Daniel Osvaldo Caso wrote: (Pst!!! Doug: Mr. Anywun Updah has a foot in the air and that makes it spooky ...! :hyp: )


Daniel

Not now Daniel! It's an old photo!

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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:2t:

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Doug

As said, and even if I have him as a friend in my new Flickr, I have no access to Mr. D. Caso's private photos.

:sad:


Daniel

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As it still exists, there must be a way you can log into that account. If you email Flickr explaining that your email account has changed and you've lost your password I would have thought they would give you a temporary access when you can then change password and email account to suit the present situation.

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Well, Doug, I have tried all ways and nothing. The only not secure chance is the new owner of Flickr responded to an extensive message from me explaining AGAIN the whole story has sent me a message telling they want to keep serving in a good way their customers so they will take contact with me to see my case as soon as they have settled as new owners which 'may take some time' so I must be patient.
All other ways are not working in my case.
And yes, I have gone through the questions, the telephones, the alternative e-mail and all of that.

BUt there is always a way: may be you can copy the photos because Mr. Caso has you in his list so you have access.
If that works you can post the photos here. If that doesn't work you can take photos of my photos with you camera and post them here. You have my permission to steal from Mr. Caso as many photos you want.:old dude:


Daniel

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Daniel, it seems that I can copy and save your photos to my computer then load them to my Flickr account for posting here. For example,

39035070915_66d0ef16ed_c by slateworks, on Flickr

It's a long way round but can be done.

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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:glad:

DOUG FOR PRESIDENT!!!

:rah::rah::rah::rah:

:rah::rah::rah::rah:

Great, Doug.Thank you.


Daniel

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Daniel, assuming you can see your own old Flickr account or use this link,https://www.flickr.com/photos/daniel_1_32_scale/albums
 if you tell me the album name and photo number I can post them for you as required.

Last edited on Sun Jul 1st, 2018 10:09 pm by slateworks

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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This is one of the two Billards that will be completed soon at the same time that the other with an open sides cab is being built
P2010846 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Giving the small leaves the glycerine bad without drying them first seems not to be a 100% success.Yesterday, while John was here, I wanted to let him see but when we  got to the basin where it all was happening I saw the leaves were becoming brown.But when I moved them for letting John see the tree armatures that were under the leaves I saw only the layer at the top had changed color but the rest was nice green.I was silly enough to move the leaves early this morning to get an idea of what was happening after the night, but that caused more leaves to be expossed to the air and start becoming brownish too.
Seeing that, I did a search in the net to refresh a bit my lonely brain cell's function and read that the drying in the oven (not the microwave) is easy and must be done in a slow warmed up oven at a temperature of 38 degree. Then let them stay at that temperature for 'many' (so say the text) hours.Next step is to prepare the glycerine: 1 part glycerine + 2parts hoit water.The the leaves must stay in the bath for -depending oin the type of plants- one to eight weeks.Afterwards is just letting them dry.
I wanted to give the oven method a try so today I went biking carrying a big plastic bag and the cutting pliers. Brought home a descent amount of those plants, prepared the oven (40 instead of 38 degree because mine can not under 40) and left them in.It seems I am going to model an autumn scene now because al leaves lost thgeir green and now vary from a very light to dark brownish okker.But I've read also today that is easy to stain them in a bath so there we go.We'll see what happens.
The Muses must have known the above because they gave me a compensation:
P2010838 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
These didn't loose the color after the oven, just got a bit darker green. But I don't care: I will try to make from them a decent vineyard and for that I'll use the airbrush and the specific wanted color.Still, the Muses' compensation had a price: these plants are a kind of nettle that knows really good how to make wour hands and arms burn as crazy for many hours.
-------
It was of extended use here in the Netherlands when I came in the late '70s- drying plants hanging then up side down keeps mopst of their colors. They become very brittle that way but a bad of glycerine solves that without problems.I read today that that way of drying gives a much better result if done during a long time and in a dark, warm room. I've read also today that spraying the dried plants with hair spray gives them an excellent protecting layer.I also read that every plastic (acrylic?) coating helps to keep the colors and the plants much better. 
So tomorrow I will keep  cropping the Netherlands, come back with another bag of plants and empty the walk in closet so I can produce enough green leaves for the rest of the coming big layout..............................:slow:............................................................
And no: no interest in growing Cannabis because I don't smoke it :old dude: (any more.)    :bg:

Daniel




Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Doug
Thank you again, dear friend.  But that is the old PUBLIC Flickr where I am not able to add, change or remove photos but I can see.Those are the albums until I left the forum but nothing of what came later.The album with the building of the Couillets and others are not accesible for me because are 'only for friends'.
But don't worry: in a couple of weeks my new Flickr will be flooded by the Couillets, the Billards and the greenery, the ferry and the steam boat and the boats & floating market.:time::java:  :java:  :java:

Daniel  

Last edited on Sun Jul 1st, 2018 11:29 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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Daniel,
I too can save your photos with my magic browser. Let me know which albums you want, with the first, second, etc. It will take a while, but maybe I can get them saved and then upload them to my Flickr account.
Anyway, tell me where to start please.
As a test, I downloaded 5 photos from the I’lle du present album. It takes only an instant to download each photo. Uploading is slower, but the actual capture is quite fast.                    


See if the quality of this album is OK. 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/nevadablue/albums/72157698109924024

I was able to download 142 pics from that album in about 10 minutes. Went crosseyed... :shocked:
I figured out a way to know where to start the next download so, a bit at a time and I will have that album saved. 

Last edited on Mon Jul 2nd, 2018 12:36 am by NevadaBlue

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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You are too good for this world, Ken.
Thank you.
I'll make a list of photos so you only save the essential ones.
Again, T-H-A-N-K-Y-O-U !!!

Last edited on Mon Jul 2nd, 2018 08:33 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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... ... ... nice 1,5mm thick brass... new Proxxon saw blade... I am SO handy with this little machines...! ...Oops...!!!


Good day, Dr Tibosch...


P2010856 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


Daniel

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Even after the accident work goes on at Magoo LKocomotive Works
Not having a big enough 1,5mm plate for making the tender chasis (which must be as heavy as possible so will also get loads of lead in every empty space) I built both from 1,5mm X 20mm strip.
P2010857 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
This is the BullAnt  motor boguie with the moro removed and a2mm thick styrene suplement addes (glued to the boguie's plate) so to get the right heigh with the tender floor
P2010860 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
The boguie is not fastened yet, I am holding alltogether for the photo
P2010859 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2010861 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2010863 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
The motor top stay very low inside the tender body so there is enough room for a decent battery or two
P2010865 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
and the weight of the batteries will also be welcome 
P2010866 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
The tender frames & floor still need the buffer beams and the floor layer as you see in the old one
P2010867 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2010869 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
It will take some work but this time will be o.k.
P2010871 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
Daniel

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Um... what is this talk of “oops”, “accident”, and why is your finger wrapped up like for winter?

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Hi Ken.
Nothing really new, just my own usual stupidity again.Had set a new blade and was cutting the pieces for the two tender frames  (1,5mm V 20mm brass strip). You know that little jewel; the Proxxon was cutting the brass as it was butter and I ... have no idea where was my mind but I suddenly felt the saw  coming 'into' the tip of my finger...The strange thing is that it did a lot of pain while I improvised a bandage and went to the doctor but then, very fast, all pain and also all sesitivity vanished and felt as the finger had been anesthetized. But it wasn't. The doctor explained that that was because the nerve was cut but will heal after a while.I can move the finger with very little pain now and there is no pain even at the tip... as long as I don't touch it or accidentally touch something.No drama. Just a reminder: ATTENTION!! ATTENTION!!! :us:
But I am very glad because this time the locos are really coming up.:glad:
Daniel

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I have a now very important question:

I have a chance to get a Proxxon GE20 engraver for really very little money but 'The State of the Onion' doesn't allow me to inves anyt single cent wrongly.
The questions are:

1)
how good is it to cut shapes in .020 styrene plate?

2)
If it works: what kind of mill bit do you use?

3)
How do you hold the thin styrene in place while milling?
I thoughtr two sided tape but experience shaw it can be pretty dificult to remove the tape from the milled styrene, specially where there are more or less delicate parts.

Daniel

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First try at getting the dried leaves colored
P2010872 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
The color was brown and the staining was done by leaving them enjoy a couple of hours bath in MIXOL #15 pigment and a lot of water. Then they were spread on a piece of hardboard and let it dry in my new plants drying room (formerly bathroom) were now half a dozen 2'X 2'hardboard plates are filling the place with different types of vegetals drying after their Glycerine bath.
P2010874 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
I have been collecting tree armatures for decades and thyme is one of the nicest but also many plants provide when they die beautiful roots that dry make great armatures.This is a thyme one but I am going to use roots because want a small tree grown just before a wall
P2010876 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
and here we go
P2010878 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
The above was don simply spraying glue on the armature but I wanted to avoid an unrealistic mass of leaves covering the trunk so I was careful at spraying AND ALSO AT SPREADING THE LEAVES so to avoid that. But you see many of the thinnest branches around but mainly near the trunk didn't got leaves.I solved that by touching those places with a small brush with a bit of contact glue and then spread more leaves on those places.It sounds much more work than it is. The whole tree may have taken about two minutes
P2010880 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
and then a tiny tree thatr will find it's place somewhere in the island
P2010881 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2010882 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
Daniel

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Another root armature. This time for a tree that will look nice at the side of a door curving above it 
P2010883 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2010885 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
This is the MIXOL pigment. Very cheap and good with water but also many other
P2010886 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

And this is the contact glue I use for the retouching
P2010888 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
Daniel

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:apl::apl::apl:

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Thank you, Doug.

It is all very easy and a lot of fun but now I've lost even the bathroom to this hobby...! :Crazy:

Thanks God this appartment has a separate toilette!!!:old dude:


Daniel

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Hello Daniel,

What happened to Your pictures?

Only Note: These pictures are not available.

Hope to see more of Your artistry:bow:

Kurt

PS: had the links in my email, have gone to website and have seen all.  :bang: :bang: :bang:  :sad: :thumb:


Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Hi Kurt

Do you mean you needed to go to Flickr to see them?
That would be strange: I am seeing them here now as always.

Thank you for your kind words.
Don't worry, as long as I don't get banned from Freerails there will be enough new to see here.
:wave:


Daniel

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Daniel Osvaldo Caso wrote: I have a now very important question:

I have a chance to get a Proxxon GE20 engraver for really very little money but 'The State of the Onion' doesn't allow me to inves anyt single cent wrongly.
The questions are:

1)
how good is it to cut shapes in .020 styrene plate?

2)
If it works: what kind of mill bit do you use?

3)
How do you hold the thin styrene in place while milling?
I thoughtr two sided tape but experience shaw it can be pretty dificult to remove the tape from the milled styrene, specially where there are more or less delicate parts.

Daniel

I have no idea. I am answering so you know I have no idea. :cb: I see people give this answer all the time, especially on Amazon. “I don’t have one of these but I am answering”. LOL... 
Remember that tiny milling bits are typically VERY fragile. Carbide is good stuff, but brittle. Cutting styrene with a high speed machine will melt the cut in the styrene if not done properly. The cutter speed and feed speed must be just right to do it. BUT, the engravers are made to ‘cut’ styrene and other materials of course. I would do a google search and look for ‘cutting styrene with a milling bit’ or something like that. :old dude:

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I see all of your pics fine.
We have a weed here called ‘Curly Dock’ and it produces zillions of seeds that look like that. Brown when dried.

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Re: Styrene Cutting
Here's a how-to that might be of some help.

Last edited on Wed Jul 4th, 2018 07:07 am by Helmut

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Thank you for that excellent non-idea !!! :glad:

O.K.: Speed is critical.

THE PROBLEM
I assume the cutters should be those with only one edge... Right?
I have one but the problems is it's about 4mm diameter.

THE SOLUTION?
As we usually don't cut styrene all through but just half deep and then break it.
I thought a regular very sharp and small angled engraving bit could do.
I have enough of those bought from China for something as one euro for 2000 pieces.
That should work fine at straight or almost lines but what about the complicated and small shapes?
For only straight lines I don't need an engraver!
I will google.

Meanwhile here, the future grapes have been separated in two groups:
 
One was dried in the oven and then stained.
Once dried they got a bit of spray paint (I am still not happy with the color)
and, because I've read it helps, a lot of layers of the same hair spray I use for fixing pastel colors on buildings.
 
The other group has got a good 24+ hours bath in Glycerine and is now drying.
We'll see what comes out.

I think my 'grapes' are also tiny seeds. 

Daniel


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Hi Helmut
I did search Youtube but couldn't find anything specific enough.

Thank you for the link. I will jump into it right now and will tell you later.
Daniel

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Well, sorry, Helmut, I couldn't find any real answer to my specific question at the link but it encouraged me to search further.

At first,the only thing I was able to find -also with no specific answers because is about milling metal, not styrene- are the welknown excellent films by Peter Cane and Giles.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8iw1CxTOm0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfB68CxDUCg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WFX0bRfFc3A

... but so I arrived to next film where it is seen a CNC machine milling styrene not exactly at slow speed which makes me think there MUST be appropriate bits available somewhere...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IiTvXdp9Jgc

The Proxxon engraver uses a Proxxon drill for power and it has an electronic speed control that seems enough for me.
L: ...Now I would like to know what think the styrene about that...L: ...

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Here my first intent to get good wine:

P2010949 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2010950 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Yes, I see, those nice leaves for other vegetation look horrible for a vineyard.

Some time ago I saw advertised a device for cutting different types of leaves in 1/35.
I liked it a lot, but having already other similar (not for leaves) cutting devices , after seeing the instructional film I discarded it because, clearly, the hand doing the work is already suffering by cutting only one leaf.
By then I wasn't planing to get a vineyard on my layout so simply dropped the link.
Now I see my own leaves are really missing the shape and spoiling the image so if someone knows about tha cutting device and gives me the link I will order one or two and build a wooden press to opperate both at once so I will spare my old muscles a lot of cramps but get the right leaves.

Any help?

Thank you.

Daniel

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No way out: 'ÎLE DU PRÉSENT' must have been a French island in the Netherlands. Si=o if you want a good wine made in the island you must bike a lot around Amsterdam:

P2010952 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2010952 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and somewhere in Groningen you will find the rest of the vineyard:

https://www.modelbouwkrikke.nl/contents/nl/p54962_plusmodel-253-esdoornbladeren.html

:glad:

Daniel

Last edited on Wed Jul 4th, 2018 02:27 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

slateworks
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Daniel, lots of leaf punches here.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=1/35+scale+leaf+punch&source=lnms&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjA-Nvq1oXcAhXlJsAKHfhSDGgQ_AUICSgA&biw=1366&bih=635&dpr=1

Maybe one of these will do the job for you.

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Thank you Doug.
Yes, those where the ones I mentioned and with one finger already hurting I don't like much the idea of punching hundreds of leaves. So I ordered two sets of these ones:

P2010955 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and will see. My worry is not only the punching but the fact that, diferently to the other leaves, these (that will pass acceptably as grape ones once the color is changed) must be clearly orientated to the stem of the plant so, I am affraid, it will probably an horrible job for poor Mr Magoo and Mrs. Impatience will probably end inventing the first flying vineyard...

So we'll see.

It is now 17.30+ so I go for the second bike round of the day. (It's a beautiful day, blue sky, 23 C. and not much wind so there I go.) :glad:

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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A little more progress:
I managed to find a shorter way to get the leaves done.
1)Dried one hour at 40C in the electric oven. 
2)Then in a bad of 40% glycerine + 60% hot water.
3) Dried for 24 hours on the backside of a piece of hardboard
4) Colored in four steps by spraying on them de desired color
They stay dry, protected but flexible.
P2020058 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
Then the grapes
done with the previously shown hands burning plant
P2010838 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
but because I like the most red wine
P2020066 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020068 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020071 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
My finger is not pointing to something special but just giving a reference for the size. 
I feel encouraged by the result, even if those are not the ordered leaves  (which will arrive in a week and a half because they didn't had them in stock) so I will try to use the magnifier when making the definitive ones.
There are half a dozen of other undergoing greenery experiments and I will post about that soon.
Daniel

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Yes, aligning the grapes so they hang perfectly vertical will receive much more attention then. :us:

Daniel

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Daniel - so nice to see you posting! following along, now.:s:

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Thank you and great that you enjoy it.

(I feel tempted to ask who is 'Southpier' but am afraid you'll answer asking who is Daniel and then I would get confused... :) )

Daniel

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S.E.Charles from the NG forum!

I still have not gotten comfortable with the "new" forum there

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Ah...!!!
Great to be again in contact with you!!!

It is a lot more silent here than what we were used at the forum and I miss the intensive daily interchange but I do feel comfortable and my plan is to stay.

Daniel

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Years ago, walking around near my home, I saw a couple of guys wildly dismantling a wooden case from where a splendid very old desk was emerging.
Suddenly my shoes forced me to stop and explaing them I was not interested on that beautiful desk didn't worked. Then I realized the 1" thick packing wood they were destroying was balsa.
I asked the fellows if I could have it and they were suddenly happy with someone doing the rouygh cleaning around.
That was about 20 years ago and now, after several layouts, I am using the remains of that balsa:

P2020095 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020097 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020098 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The roughness was done in about two minutes using this piece from a belt for a very old wooden floor belt sander

P2020126 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020125 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

As you see at the first photo in this post, the bottom of the trunk hadn't an interestring shape so I glued around it more pieces of balsa which were also sanded with the same coarse 'blue tool'

P2020096 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020100 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The trunk is 440mm tall (something more than 17") and is being the core of a little experiment.
P2020101 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Last edited on Mon Jul 9th, 2018 09:47 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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The tree won't be for my layout because is just one of those sudden inexplicable impulses often raining on thge creative spirit. But, as always, also a source of fun.

I disn't sand away the hairs of balsa standing around the trunk becausae my shoes told me to let them stay.
I sprayed the whole trunck with a good covering layer of matt black but keep spraying it with three different browns, a bit of green and finaly, at the top, some touches of light gray.
Once the paint was dry I played on it with dry pastels until I liked what I've got

P2020109 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020110 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020111 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020115 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020117 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020120 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020122 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

I never modelled conifers before but have learnt that two key aspect to keep in mind at modelling trees are

1) The type of climate and weather in the area of the scene

and

2) The direction of the wind the tree gets.

This pine, being so far a kind of refugee, has not yet an idea of where is going to end but something is telling me if it goes well will probably end near a Lost Creek... :wave:

Daniel

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What a wonderful result and explanation of how you did it. Thanks, Daniel!

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Howdy Daniel, I wish my shoes would tell me what to do! The tree is looking like a real one in miniature. Whether you finish it or not, it is typical of your work-wonderful! Thanks for showing it, I want to make some trees now.

Woodie

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Daniel

Nice looking start for the conifer trunk

:2t::2t:

A third point to add, is that moss normally grows on the North side of a tree (at least North of the Equator).

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Mike
Great that it is useful for you.I will post in a moment a few more photos showing the tree with soome green added.

It is real fun to make it and I don't care i don't need them, I am going to make a few more just for fun.
Mr Magoo here is astonished and saying to me 
" How did we manage to do that?  :glad:"
(we here are unable to use n-b-w in our builds because we can drill the holes but then, with the tweezers holding the tiny casting, we never manage to find the hole again and. If once we do, the surprise is so much joy that we spend the rest of the day on our knees searching the da...d flying casting!!!) So I think we are going to add the rest of the twigs tomorrow. L:
Daniel

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Woodie
The tric to hear clearly the shoes guiding is not to listen to the parrot we all carry inside our head who always believe he knows better but has never done a thing.:old dude:


If you start making trees after reading my post that will be huge honor for this disciple.:2t:
Daniel

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Thank you Ken.
That's new to me. I was convinced it had to do with the presence of some protection (as for example other trees, a building or topography) and exposing to the wind.Never late to learn. :2t:

Daniel

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Hewre the photos of the 'state of the onion'

P2020115 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020135 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020137 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020138 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020139 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020142 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020150 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020151 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020152 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020153 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Of course is not goimng to be on the layout but next photo is to get an idea of it

P2020154 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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...but the really big news is the motorizing of the first of the two tender frames is now done. I will try to complete the other today and post them to John in the morning.

P2020143 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

slateworks
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I do like your trees Daniel and have been making something similar in the last few weeks. I wanted some tall spruce trees for Updah's depot area so, like you, used balsa for the trunks, making the surface pointed and rough but using a small Surform for the job.

I then "implanted" a large number of JTT wire foliage branches starting with small ones at the top and working down to the biggest ones at the bottom. My five trees range from 20cm to 68cm in height and used 6 boxes at 60 branches a box. Not the cheapest way to make them but much, much less than buying ready mades and I found a seller in the US who sent all my orders free of postage and at a unit price far less than I could get in the UK.

On the bench before adding dead branch ends at the bottom

c (13) by slateworks, on Flickr

Branches pressed into the balsa trunk. No glue is needed.

c (15) by slateworks, on Flickr

In position with my earlier attempts using plastic asparagus fern.

c (22) by slateworks, on Flickr

Looking forward to seeing yours on the layout

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JTT wire foliage??? Where and how do you get that stuff?

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Mike, most model shops have it, some in several shades but I've been using these people as they post free to UK. 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/str/bicwarehouseuk

I see now though that they only have the one colour so maybe there wiill be a wait for a re-stock. In the meantime, you can pick out your US suppliers from here.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=jtt+foliage+branches&oq=jtt+foliage+branches&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i60l2.7696j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

P.S. For some reason, I thought they were a US supplier but I now realise they are in the UK, hence the free postage.

P.P.S. This gets more complicated! The name of the seller is Bicwarehouse_UK but the product is located in New Jersey USA - and presumably judging by the post time frame is sent from there too.

Last edited on Mon Jul 9th, 2018 05:35 pm by slateworks

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I've found several suppliers here now. Thanks Doug.

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Nice work, Doug.They fit really nicely the atmosphere of Updah.

MY approach is much wilder because I have no idea about names or types of trees but just the feeling of their presence while I walk or bike so I may be talking/modeling just nonsense (as always.)Even worse: I used the wrong type of foliage instead of the quiet different that pushed me to model the tree. So tomorrow I will be doing the planbed one.
Anyway the price of both today's and tomorrow's foliage is for 10 kg. just 0,00 cent because are generously given to me by my mom: nature. ("That's our man", is Mr. Wallet saying with a broad smile of satisfaction.)
But, even with the wrong foliage, I like what I've got:
P2020171 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020160 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020162 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020165 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
I will go downstairs, pick up another piece of balsa and come to start shaping it so I can paint it before I go to bed and get it ready for tomorrow morning.
Daniel



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Daniel,

What did you use for foliage on the tree above? It looks great!

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Mike
In order of importance this is what I use:
1) My eyes.
2) Attention
3) My bike (or eventually my shoes)
4) Scissors
5) A big plastic box where to bring home the grass without crushing it
6) At least two tones of the cheapest available acrylic spray paint (or any other)
7) A good spray booth or the open air without neighbors
8) A GOOD PAPER MASK
9) A GOOD PAPER MASK
10) A GOOD PAPER MASK!!!
11) Latex gloves
12) Patience
13) A base (for example of foam as in the images but it can also be wood or whatever)          with small holes where to set the painted grass to dry.
14) an abundant type of grass in my area as you see in the photos
P2020180 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
The above photo shows two different shapes of grass. I don't know if they are the same type at different stages of development or two different types. They both grow everywhere here

The photo below shows the one I use
P2020181 (4) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020184 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020185 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020186 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020189 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020190 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020191 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020192 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
This will give you a better idea of it's size
P2020193 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
In next photo you see one of the drying blocks
P2020195 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020194 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
Now I go for the second tree with the planed foliage.More about later today.
Daniel

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I forgot to mention a couple of things:


1) WARNING:

I have read that if plants are dried and covered with a protective layer as varnish, acrylic or other paints or coatings, the decomposing process stops so they will preserve their completude instead of falling apart.

That is what I have done with the above grass BUT I DON'T KNOW YET WHAT IT WILL BE IN THE LONG TIME.

A bath in glycerine -as done and mentioned in previous postings- would be probably a better option, but because this specific type of grass is very thin and has lots of tiny branches, I was afraid in the bath it would become a bit of an undifferentiated mass.

(Personaly, because I'm not interested on 'having' a layout but just on building as many of them as I can enjoy and -experience taught me the hard way- expecting to sell them would be just a childish delusion, I really don't worry about the decay of things or even my own therefore neither about preservation issues. But, of course, that doesn't mean it should be the same for others.)

2) BUSH

Using the same grass and a piece of tape. (the tape will be inserted into the baseboard so won't stay visible but if wanted a touch with colored modeling paste will make of it a convincing trunk.)

P2020200 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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Well, my plans for making the second tree trunk last night were delayed but here we go.
A not even square  strip of Balsa
[size=P2020201 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr][size=
]
[size=a few wild cuts at what will be the top of the trunk taking care of saving all the wigs because are essential][size=
]
[size=P2020202 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr][size=
]
[size=Next photo illustrate the principle which is NOT what I am going to do because another principle will enrich that first one][size=
]
[size=P2020203 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr]

Before adding the buttresses to the 'natural' architecture of the tree I ensure not traces of a square will remain because the such would destroy any  feeling of 'natural' grow
P2020204 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
Another thing I avoid is to repeat shape and size of the buttresses
P2020206 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
(The first trick is NOT TO THINK.When we do we are operating information reduced to systems by the mind. When we act without doing so (= when we just don't know what we are doing) we are alowing nature to decide through us which is the core of harmony in awhatever we do.There is a second but also essential trick for ensuring the link with nature: EMPATHY.It is nothimng more than feeling we are the tree we are modeling; feeling the needs of it's shape and proportions as ours. Then the information flows naturally to us and we don't need to think for knowing exactly what to do.)

P2020208 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020210 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020212 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020213 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020214 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020215 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
I will spare this time (after all this is just my second conifer and I am learning) the Balsa sawdust so I can use it as a natural 'putty' for filling here and there some cavities between the buttresses... if really needed.
I am using a strong and fast PVA glue that is, once dry, water-resistant. If I would be using common PVA and am going to paint with acrylics, I would ensure the buttresses are pinned to the trunk. All you need is two pins for each buttress orientated in a bit converging or diverging directions as this  \   /  or like this   /   \  so, even if the glue softens under the water in the paint, the added parts won't move.
Drying time for the trunk.Coffiee time for Magoo.More later.

Daniel

Last edited on Tue Jul 10th, 2018 11:00 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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ERRORS ARE GOLD
The sanding of the trunk is going o.k. but the glue ius not dry enough yet so I only started sanding the rest.By doing so I've found I had made a 'wrong' cut with the knife while doing the first rough shaping of the trunk and at sanding it gets obvious:
P2020216 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020218 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
that will provide a good start for an area of fallen brak as I did yesterday on the first tree.
P2020223 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020224 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

More later.
Daniel

slateworks
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I do like the grass foliage Daniel. It will be interesting to see how robust and long lasting it is but it's got me looking at options here!

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Great, Doug, that you've got it.
The glycerine bath would ensure it stays good for at least a dozen of years but would also mean a lot of care during both, the bath and the drying. I suppose one should let them dry mendingf up side down from a cord.
If you got interest for the naturing arround you that is the very best I could hear after my post.
I am sure there are plenty of great options in your own neighborhood.
I am preparing my lunch now but will post  later a photo of a beautifully failed experiment I've made yesterday with a simple green leave.
Daniel

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You have bought the NWSL Chopper so you want to ensure you will always have reserve blades at home even if the blade you are using breakes at midnight after a great inspired modeling Saturday...
P2020231 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
You have enjoyed your Chpper a lot but one day you finally get the small Proxxon table saw and the Chopper goes to another good home.
But you forgot the blades...What do you do with 30 blades if the Chopper is gone?... ... ...
Blame Sid, you get infected by the palm trees virus and you want to find your way to it...
You know some modelers reached nice results with feathers...Others did it with laser cut leaves. Good idea, but Mr Wallet would kil me another seven times if I dare to even think about it...
There are brass etching for palm leaves... (Yes, but this fellow must be drunk: Mr. Wallet would want him to be served raw)
Remain making the leaves cutting them by hand, one by one and then making the 50 or 60 (may be more) incisions on each leave again by hand... (Too much alcohol in this neighborhood.)
HOW TO MAKE PALM TREES (first intent)
You drop all the above in the mind's all-embracing blender and decide:
Those blades have a centered hole and a knotch at each end.That will make easy to pass a long thread holding say 30 blades. A nut at each end will ensure they stay in place.The knotches will allow two metal rods for exact alignment with each other.Hmm... instead of nuts I could use three threads and a retaining plate with three holes at each end for holding the 30 blades fast and aligned...
Hmm...It could work...But why not make a first try and see if the blades can do the job?
Next day, while harvesting a mountain of wild grass for making a conifer, you remember and include an aprppriate shaped green leave.
--------------
P2020234 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
---------------
You take the green leave and one of the blades and make at each side the cuts for making a palm tree blade.The forget.
Next day youy are pretty busy making the conifer and suddenly the cut leave goes:
_Eh...Chubby...!!! Do you forget me?_
Then you see the incisions have generated a very fast drying process which caused all the cut strips to curl. A lot.Frustrated you are ready to throw it away but the leave starts singing:
You say you've seen seven wonders and you bird is green but you don't see me...You don't see me!...
:glad:

and then you realize this may become something interesting.You spray the curly leave with enough paint to make a secure coating and next day (that's today) you find the leave is dry, whole and very flexible
P2020227 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020228 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020230 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
I don't know exactly what but this is going to be something. Soon.
But ... the palm trees?:old dude:
Well, Sidi won't get hurt by waiting a bit more.  :time:

Mr. Magoo, Mr. Wallet & Daniel


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As Inspector Clouseau used to say: "_ A little bit of this, a little bit of that..._ "

P2020237 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020235 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020236 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020239 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020240 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020241 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020242 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020246 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020248 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020247 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

This time a bit more sanding will be needed but it is a delightful afternoon here of a now dry day and 23C, my hammock is shameless extended at the balcony and I can't keep her away of my mind with the Penguin Café Orchestra playing this album 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMSXWPjpaxQ
 ... so work must be delayed probably until tomorrow.
Daniel


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Sorry, I forgot a little bit of this:

P2020249 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020251 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020252 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020253 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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Watching the artist at work...

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Ken
And so do I!
I have no clear idea of what Im doing ... I thought those pieces of plastic will make one day easier  to model the sides of the bonnet for a car or a Diesel ... Hmm... We both know it's not probable that I to do something like ...You know me, I couldn't just through it away...:us:

The tree trunck is going to have a lot of reworking today and if thoings go fine may be tonight I have the complete tree done.We'll see.

Daniel

Last edited on Wed Jul 11th, 2018 05:33 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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Here a sketch of what I am trying to do with this tree

P2020264 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020265 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020266 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


Yes, two of the lower twigs are up-side-down. An error but also a lesson: all twigs up-side-down will provide a third type of pine. :old dude:

P2020268 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020271 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The learning so far:

These twigs had a super fast (just one hour) Glycerine bath. Well, they need at least a couple of days because now I see they are not flexible enough.
Painting or staing them is discarded: I alike too much the contrast of the brown of the stam with the green of the baldes and want absolutely to keep both.

Apart of a more serious gluceryne bath,I will spray a good layer of varnish before and after fixingf them to the trunk.

I need more twigs. The ones I have are all now on the tree and it's about 1/4 of what must be.

The trunk was far from ready yet but it is clear it will need in this case a more raw omber (redish) tones and a more delicate gray.

More later.

Daniel

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Nice conifers.  To me it looks like the difference between a Ponderosa Pine and a Western Cedar.  The cedar being the new one.  Variation of conifers is important when modeling out west for certain.:cb:

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Thank you, Steven.
Would be great if you could post one or two images so I can learn what/how are a Ponderosa pine and aWestern Cedar.
In the mean time here a couple of new images of the second pine:

P2020285 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020286 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020288 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020282 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020284 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020274 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020272 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr



(L: ... It looks -in my ignorant opinion- acceptable for 1/32 but would look a lot better if one day I decid to torment you all with a Gn15 layout...)

Anyway the green color is the real one but a bit too dominat in this setting. To get a more harmonious atmosphere it would need a light airbrushing with black acrylic ink.
But, as said before, none of these pines will remain in the island so once the batch now drowning in the glycerine sea and I know the material is good enough to be used for a long term permanence, this experiment will be ended and Mr. Magoo, Mr. Wallet and I will get back to our own business at the loco shed.

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Hi Daniel,
Your trunks need to be a little more "red" for western trees, but again you're modeling takes place in France.  But for those who are modeling lumbering in the Far West (U.S.A.) these are great models!!!  :apl:

Ponderosa Pine also would work as a Jeffrey Pine as they are kissing' cousins.  But you need a "vanilla" stink-um for when the wind blows.  The Jeffreys, loving the Eastern Sierra Nevada, have a scent that when the wind blows, reminds you of your old grandmother baking cookies.  It is heavenly!  Notice on the Ponderosa the branches dip down.



Leaves (needles)



Wester Red Cedar



Leaves - you nailed it!



And just for fun Oregon Pine (as known in the mid-late 1800s), now known as Douglas Fir.  Branches go up and the needles are very short.



Doug Fir Needles



Excellent modeling, without looking at a prototype, you nailed it.  Now you loggers, get your axes sharpened!!  I am still trying to work up a Two Needle Pinon Pine.
[toast]

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Steven

Thank you a lot for the photos & explanations and thank you also for your kind words.

My 'pine'is not mean to be on my 'French' isalnd nor any other place that I build. As said before, it was just a desire to play a bit and see what could I reach in my intent.

A more serious modeler's approach would face and dig in questions as the location of the branches: are they radially distributed? Helically? Following any gepometrical ryhtm? None? Etc.

Also de kinds of barks for evry type... But such a goal oriented approach would probably never get roots at 'Ile du Présent' where thinking & planing are not often enjoyed.
What I do is to feed Mrs. Curiosity endless appetite and let her decide what and when she whispers into the muses' ears... :old dude:

Daniel

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(But the Red Cedar is killing me again and again...!!!)

Zorro

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Nice variations Daniel.

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Thank you, Doug.

Such type of trees are not in my plans but was n ice to play a bit with them.
Now I must get back to my own island and get there things done.
May be when the island start it's growing process I will see if I manage to make some convincing Mediterrean Pines.
They arew quiet different and requiere a lot of work at their bark most of which is clearly visible. And I think they will like the company of some Palm trees.
But we knoiw the future doesn't exists so may be instead I will enjoying a big icecream at a real Spanish island or some other Daniel Friendly place of this madhou... planet.
For the time being I have before my nose the perspective of unexpected and serious surgery but I will know more about in a week or two. :w:


Daniel

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As for the trees, I knew a quite arrogant modeler who thought everything he did was the best anyone could do. He once challenged a group to come up with a type of scenery he couldn't model. He was up for the challenge, and while the results were okay (if not better than average), it wasn't as good as how he made it out to be.

I stymied him when I gave an example I doubt anyone can model accurately-


Southeast scrub pine forest (around south Georgia and North Florida).


I'm convinced that nobody can model this accurately. There's a reason nobody models north Florida, and this is the primary reason.

Last edited on Wed Jul 11th, 2018 08:40 pm by Lee B

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Lee

Thank you for that nice photo.

I am not sure what I do can be called 'modeling'.
Actually I don't even know good what I am doing until it is done and I see the photos.
I wouldn't even try to model something as it is, doesn't matter what.
Of course I did before, but every time, half way, that 'something' I now call 'the muses' started pushing me to follow a flow where scale drawings and such thing are just cheap jokes.
Of course that doesn't mean that others should do as I do. I don't know what I am doing, how could I know what others should?

L: ... Anyway your very beautiful photos is whispering in my ear that two first surface mirrors joining at 90 degree- would
help to...
No.
A wooden rectangular case as for a small layout with an open front. Three 'first surface mirrors' (also called 'front plated mirrors') laid along three sides of the box letting, of course, the front open. That would provide an endless space where two dozen of treess would do the trick.

For the tall grasss I have bought recently the marvelous 35Kw "Greenkeper" which makes miracles with 12mm static grass.Specially if one applies several layers.

The main problem at modelling such a scene would be the sky, but we don't think in terms of 'problems' at "Ile du Présent" where no one really models but just en-joy whatever life brings up. :us:


Daniel

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Yes, I have known a couple of those "best ever" modelers...funny thing is that although I asked to see their work, they were way too busy to show anything. Could it be that they couldn't "put their money where their mouth was"?

Have fun and run a train...today.
Woodie

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Well, Woodie, I can still recall myself walking around through my neighborhood wearing a cowboy hat, two toy revolvers and a selfmade 'Winchester' convinced my neighbors would realize I was a very dangerous hero.
I mean: we grow up when we can. 
For some of us it may take a little longer than for others ...................................:slow:


:us:

Daniel






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Lee:
Reflecting on my comments on reproducing your woods scene I realized this morning that my idea of the three mirrors wouldn't work so simple: the mirror at the back of the scene would reflect the viewer too...:bang: ...

:Crazy: ... :Crazy: ... :Crazy: ...


:old dude:That could be solved if one makes some convenient obstacle at the foreground -a wall or whatever- so the viewer can not look from a spot where he could see his own reflection but is forced to look from a higer point of view where he can see reflected only the area up to the front edge of the scene.


( Mr. Wallet should realize I deserbve to get a set of those first surface mirrors to play with...!!!  :sad:

Daniel

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there was a great article about mirrors by John Allen in Model Railroader LONG ago. Worth tracking.
Jose.

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Once again, I return to steal more tricks from your thread. Eventually, I will want to add some larger Black Hills Spruce trees to my layout. So, I am watching the evergreen information with interest.

Larry G

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Thank you, José.
Yes. I've kept that article for many years but it went to the charity with the whole bound MRR collection about an year ago when modelling needs were already pushing the walls of my home. But the article was really a great clinic.
I seem to recall it was not exactly by John Allen but about his use of mirrors in G&DRR.Am I wrong?
I still recall all the John Allen's b&w photos for the publicty of Varney products at the back cover of MRR...
Born in 1950, in Buenos Aires, I've discovered MRR during the 60's; but a few years later was very lucky and got, second hand, the full collection from the very first issues. :glad:
I've spent many times more hours with it than with my study books!.

Daniel

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Larry
The final load of foliage for the pinetrees experiment is now for the second ...Hmm... Third?... day in the glycerine bath.I will keep it there for five or six more days and then let it dry slowly on paper.Then I will be 100% sure it works.
Another load of the same foliage that was dried by nature when still in the real tree, has got a two days bath and then dried. It has been dry for morer than a week now and is still perfectly flexible, not brittle at all.Actuall it was already very brittle when I brought it but the glycerine gave it that flexibility back.I think properly treated it will make a truly excellent material with a very long life.
I considered using the natural died one for the model pine. It would be very easy to spray it with every desired color + varnish. But the the color would cover everything and I really love to see the natural combination of the green leaves growing from the brown stems
P2020289 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020290 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

I am sure in your Gn15 layout these pines will be at their best!Can't wait to see see it done !!!
Daniel

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I need some technical help.

For motorizing the two Couillet locos I am using two Holiwood Foundry "BullAnt" motor boguies mounted in the tenders.

It's all o.k. but somehow I managed to get a poor working retaining plate at one of the axles. (Blame me, not the company. I am an expert at causing such problems.)

Here two photos

P2020294 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The problem is the little black plate (with it's legs up in the photo) fall from it's place easily with very little contact.
Is there a way to solve it without bothering poor Geoff who is still recovering for serious surgery?
P2020291 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Thank you!!!

Daniel

Last edited on Thu Jul 12th, 2018 04:53 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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Redneck solution: a couple turns of copper wire around the whole thing. Hi tech solution: HELMUTH!!!.
Jose.

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Hi Daniel: article could have been by Jim Findley. Memory somewhat rusty. Will look later for it
From Baires also.Jose.

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Thank you, José.

(After your name and now that advice I must conclude you are also an Argentine!!!) :bg:


Daniel

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HáaaAAA...!!!

How couldn't I recognize the traces of our national spirit?

(Born in partido de San Martín, grown up in Hurlingham, scaped to Europe half a dozen lives ago and already 39 years rooted in Amsterdam where time is only for tourists but doesn't exists for us locals.)

Daniel

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Hi Daniel,
Perhaps one of the 2-part superglues? These come with "primer" in a pen and the super glue part. These can work for for acetyl type plastics.

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Hi John!
That would be, indeed, a good option for a pair of good eyes.

But I couldn't imagine Mr. Magoo here using such a glue for glueing those super tiny bits.Niether could I imagine myself trying to remove it for repair or whatever.And the face of Mr. Wallet discovering I have used his account for orthering a replacement BullAnt boguie because the glue has covered the brass gear, axle and retaining plate, is really far beyond my imagination.
Anyway thank you for the hint.It's  good to know you are here too.  :2t:

Daniel

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Hi Daniel,
PM coming...

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John
PM sent.
Daniel

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Finally both tender mechanisms have got their motoriuzing.
One is still nacked but is here early in the morning so...

I think I will send boith to my friend John Vogelaar for installing the RC stuff and go later further with the clothes, paintings and all that stuff.

The construction of the tenders may make laugh every experienced modeler but is simple and Daniel friendly so if I ever decide to build more locos this will be probably my way again


P2020295 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Yes, it is a cage 3D printed in WS&F, the cheapest and strongest plastic material available at Shapeways with styrene clothes on made of .020 styrene

P2020296 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The2mm massive brass floor helps to provide some weight for the otherwise much too light construction. The motor bogie, the LiPo batteriy and all available corners filled with massive brass from the scrapbox will ensure a decent pulling force... If not the brass will be replaced by lead.


P2020298 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020299 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020300 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The underframe, which I wanted with acceptable detail, is 3D printed in FUD. A better option would be the new harder flexible black plastic added to the Shapeways range, but that would requiere also a better wallet so...

The opening at the top of the tender is mean to allow -if needed- a bigger nbattery taht would be disguised under a load of firewood, but I don't think such a big battery will be needed.
Daniel

Last edited on Fri Jul 13th, 2018 06:13 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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These photos shows how the printed cage is fastened to the brass plate

P2020303 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020304 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and this is one of the wooden buffer beams Pete had prepared for the brass locos. They are nice done but about 2mm too short so I will re-do them. Still, he did really very nice work

P2020301 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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L:
...and now, seeing the enlarged photos, I realize I must lower the tender body about 1mm or even more ...!:shocked:

Daniel

Last edited on Fri Jul 13th, 2018 10:29 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

slateworks
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Looking very good Daniel and those 3D prints have come out very nicely. Presumably there will be some sort of a "cap" over the motor and flywheel to protect them and the RC equipment from each other.

Last edited on Fri Jul 13th, 2018 12:04 pm by slateworks

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Hi Doug

Yes, there will be a layer of card or something like that but first I must know the size of the batteries.
There are several possibilities with one, two or three batteries.
(I assume yoiu remember the clothes of the tender are handmade in styrene using my selfmade rivetter.)



Now something else:

The ordered leaves arrived.
I feel really frustrated because for two boxes I've paid 20 euro (incl. post) but there are too few leaves for a wineyard. It would cost sixty or seventy euros to get a bit of a vineyard presence. So it will be just a small vine in the yard of the higher house extending above a pergola as the one in the house of my grandpa sixty years ago.

As soon as I get the chance to talk personally to Michael Carl I will see if he wants to made a serie of paper cuttings with the laser. I have already the design in mind for make a lot easier and chipper to cut and to display very convincing vines and other types of greenery.

Here the photos of my frustrating aquisition:

P2020307 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

They are really beautiful ...

P2020306 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

but see what one box contains:

P2020305 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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Mr. Magoo is trying to convince me about letting these locos aside as they are now and, with the experience and knowledge we have gathered so far re-desig the components for a much better version that can be used as a kind of basic kit and would allow me to build as many locos as I want...
(Magoo is dreaming with a big area with a loco & car repair sheds...)

Daniel

slateworks
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Gosh, there really are only a very few leaves in those boxes Daniel! You might have been better to get one of the many leaf cutters available for EUR 9.00 or EUR 10.00 and make your own. The examples look just as good and you could select the paper colours that you prefer.

And yes, I do remember that the tender's covering was produced using your own riveting machine and very nicely done. If you're going into mass production, I wonder if Shapeways printed coverings would be cheap enough and save a lot of time - assuming they can be done with minimal strata marks to avoid sanding off the rivets!!

Last edited on Fri Jul 13th, 2018 04:33 pm by slateworks

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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L: ...

Hmm... So it seems I have a way to solve some things.
You know Magoo and I here have too much trouble with Mr Wallet who gets terrified every time he notice he can't stop our will to get something.
Today Magoo and I were considerimng the posibility of redesigning the loco.
When Mr. W. noticed we were considering the costs of that he panicked and after a while he came up with a good alternative that would cost just nothing but improve the building of the locos a lot.

The main issue that made Magoo and I doubt was that we had made a serious mistake at measuring the position of the threaded holes for fastening the tender body to the floor.
I don't know if you notice but once screwed the body presented small but noticeable distorions in the otherwise peerfectly straight lines.
Repostioning the little flaps with the holes was of course imposible. Enlarg9ing the holes in the brass would have been an option but containing several rows of headaches.

We also had something else to be solved: the motorized tender's weight.

Suddenly Mr. W. smiled and said:

_There is no need to redesign nor to make new tenders!_

And here what he brought up:

P2020312 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020311 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020309 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Those are two full length solid brass bars 8mm X 8mm epoxied to the sides of the tender body.
They ensure no distortion at all along the sides and provide at the same time a mass of material so we can make the new holes wherever we want. And of course make a serious contribution to the final tractive effort of the locos. :2t:

(It was clever to let Mr W. notice, in time, that what Magoo and I were considering would have costed him about 200euro!!! ):glad:

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They will also provide a base for the card or whatever is needed to cover the motor and flywheel when the RC equipment goes in.

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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You are right, Doug about the leaves. :sad:

No, no mass production coming (at least for the time being... L: )

I have already found some time ago the way to get perfect 3D prints from Shapeways without traces of layering: I ensure the body is printed in parts, as a kit, and all of them piled with what will be the visible side up. The upper side rarely present traces of layering.
I have got several prints done that way. For example the very complex but full detailed axleboxes for the Billard.

What I would love to do is to design a set of p[arts that combined in four or five different ways can provide as many prototypical variations.
These little Couillets were produced in many, many variations and all of them really nice.
If one day I manage to get a 1000 or 1500 euro to get that running as a reliable and easy to build kit that will be the start of "M.C.& W. Locomotive works." L:

Daniel

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Yes.I have just measured  and instead of 8mm X 8mm brass I could use 10mm X 15mm and the top will be 1mm above the top of the flywheel so the card can lay on the brass strips.
Have account that 8mm X 8mm is 64 sq.mm but 10mm X 150mm is 150 sq.mm which is  more than twice as much weight.
In termns of LiPo's that means there will be, above the thick card plate, room for 
a 7mm X37mm X 54mm  
or a 14mm X 28mm X 46mm battery
... and it's own weight.
Daniel

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Hi Daniel,

Great looking layout so far! Inspiriational stuff.

Alwin

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Thank you, Alwin.
And great if you get inbspired by this madness too.:2t:

Daniel

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Daniel,

I've been following your marvelous work over the last few weeks. I enjoy your postings for techniques that I have not seen before. The weathering on those European buildings and attention to details is amazing. I have recently retired and think that I have found the perfect place for my retirement home. Trouble is, I am still waiting for that shrinking machine that I ordered to arrive at my home before I decide which of the buildings in your little village I would like to reside in! Hope the machine works as well as it says in the advertisement. :)

Kevin Fall

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Hi Kevin

Thank you for your very kind words.
It is great to know you enjoy my extended modeling nonsense too!

You won't need a shrinking machine at all. You neither need much skills to get such buildings done.

The spirit of it all is the old 'organic architecture' as source of inspiration.
Such villages were built without planing nor 'style' but just by coomon people standing on their needs with their feet on the real surroundings so they could make creative, intelingent use of the materials in their area. And, as you have probably noticed, also all kind of improvised repairs were made through the years.

Once one gets that under the skin, one is able to produce endless variations of the same harmony and, the most important, really enjoy without worries as 'scale drawings' and such nonsense.
I don't even measure things more than by eye. How less'perfect' they come up the better.

I do spend many hours digging in joy Delcampe's website where you can find millions of old postcards from every desired country.

May be you will like to take a look so here the link.
(It is in French but they do have an English version too)


In the column at the left of the first link you find the continents. When you choose you get an extended list of countries.
The second link is the one I have been using for t=years now and where I gather most of the inspiration for my modelling.
The second link is the one for the images of France but then you can choose for the specific are you want in the columns of the main space.

Enjoy!!!


Daniel



https://www.delcampe.net/fr/collections/cartes-postales/

https://www.delcampe.net/fr/collections/cartes-postales/france/

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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The layout really, REALLY needs a serious extention.
How could I not to get something of this on it?

https://www.google.nl/search?q=PONT-EN-ROYANS&rlz=1C1EODA_nlNL771NL771&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjtuMG5hZ7cAhWSEVAKHe9TDdIQsAR6BAgFEAE&biw=1530&bih=746&dpr=1.25

Daniel

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See this:

http://www.kolbrink.nl/IMG_0162.JPG

Daniel

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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I have found exactly the type of coach for the island!!!

You'll see in this link if you scroll down to the last photo.
I mean the little four wheeled one that is screaming to become a laser kit from Michael's cutter:


http://www.inventaires-ferroviaires.fr/hd17/17306.1.pdf

Daniel

Larry G
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Here is a nice open air coach. Found on the internet.  Larry G

Attachment: ventura_streetcar.1.jpg (Downloaded 64 times)

Last edited on Sat Jul 14th, 2018 01:24 pm by Larry G

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Thank you, Larry.

Yes, that's a very nice one but a bit too massive for a 500mm gauge line.

My plan is to make some (four or five) of the little closed coaches as in the photo of one of my previous posts but I have already some open ones I've made for a now gone layout.

If I manage to find some photos will post them here.

Daniel

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Here some photos of the open coaches with the Billard loco.
That was the yard of "PONDÉZAR" (now gone folding & portable layout)

P1650050 by d.caso, on Flickr

P1640422 by d.caso, on Flickr


DSC02028 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC02246 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC02024 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC02331 by d.caso, on Flickr



Daniel

Last edited on Sat Jul 14th, 2018 02:36 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Yes, that is the article, Tom.

Thank you.

(I hope Kalmbach is not going to sue you for posting it.)

It is a BIG surprise.
I mean it is so big that I only can see the left side of each page! :bang:


:)


I like your (for me new) signature.
Much more positive than the previous and this time with a taste of acceptance that is never misplaced.

Daniel

tebee
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It's been posted on the GD lines site for several years and no ones complained about it.
I'm displaying the the pages from that site directly here - they are not on Freerails - so I don't have any control over the size.
Would suggest you download them to your computer if you can't view them here.
Think I've had that sig for a while here tis very true though.
Tom

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Thank you, Tom.

But I was not looking for the article.
As said, I gave the whole collection of MRR to the charity because what was of my interest is already integrated somewhere in Magoo's brain cell and, of course, that article too.
I have some experience with first surface mirrors so know the tricks and the beundaries conbsiderably well.
Nevertheless, thank you a lot for your concern.
And don't worry about the size: it is even for me easy to set the image smaller in my screen so I can see the whole pages.  :2t:

Daniel

Last edited on Sat Jul 14th, 2018 05:12 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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The magazine article post has had to be removed

Copyright material such as this CANNOT be posted on Freerails

:f:

Eddie



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:sad:


:us:


Daniel

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P1650110 by d.caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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Not the same as before and also not French, neither fourwheeled and wioth five windows instead of four...still not bad at all for the island.
The woodwork of the sides would look great...

P1400854 by d.caso, on Flickr

Daniel

Larry G
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Excellent job on the open coaches, Daniel.  Your models remind me of a HOn 2 1/2 coach offered by Joffe (not sure of spelling) a French co. This goes way back to the 60s. Some day I may try my hand at building a open coach too.    Larry G

Attachment: DSC00404 2.jpg (Downloaded 70 times)

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Howdy Daniel & Larry...Yea, many many years back, I owned 2 of those old HOn30 Jouef open tourist cars. They are lost to the ages now but a few moons back, I found a wonderful "replacement" for my 35n2 operation. Tom Bell (teebee) offered the same sort of open car as I wanted, all built up, and printed in 3-D.

The price was very reasonable, considering how much fiddly work it would involve to build such a model. Totally built in a very substantial resin or whatever...this thing weathered several nights outside and still looks like she did when I "finished" her! Just an underframe, trucks, truss rods, couplers, paint, and these rough-looking characters were added by me. If interested, maybe Tom would run another in 1:35 scale, or probably most any other scale. Geez...I may be interested in another one myself. Thanks for the memories Larry.                                     Woodie

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Hi Woodie!
Great to see you're posting again too!
Yes, I remember when that beautiful open coach arrived to Mogollon you was very proud of and I was simply jealous.
May be by then I was just focused on the design that I didn't notice the beautiful painting and weathering job you did. Now I do and I certainly like it.I like also a lot the archbar trucks with the spoked wheels you gave it, totally in line with the character of  Tom's design.
Daniel

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Larry
Thank you for your kind words.
Yes, those Jouef coaches where a shortened version of the typical Decauville ones.If I had the room for a seriously big layout I would absolutelly go for the full length Decauville open coachs (and also for the closed ones) but they would be about 1' (30cm) long each not counting the couplers so just the loco with three coaches would be almost 3'long and would make my ''huge' layout look as a mini pizza one. :us:
(As you must have noticed, I avoid making trains beeing the everywhere dominating thing in the scene. Nevertheless, once I get the Couillets running (they are at the moment going through a kind of identity crisis due Magoo's error at epoxying the brass weights inside the tender) the box where I have have been kiping hidden for years about 30 Peco 0n30 and H0 switches will jump on my workbench, no doubt, and something as a more or less serious station with it's yard will arise ...)
Daniel

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The coach in thge first photo is by Canon-Legrand

12 8 2012 1158-002 by d.caso, on Flickr

Next is a Decauville

DSC02946-001 by d.caso, on Flickr

Next one is also a Decauville , this time of the type that inspired mine

DSC03929-001 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC03930-001 by d.caso, on Flickr

Next is of a similar type but an a bit longer version

DSC04223 by d.caso, on Flickr

And the following are German versions

DSC01402-001 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01273-001 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01401-001 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01272-001 by d.caso, on Flickr

Last but not least, a draisine pushing me to buy a Pololu geared motor (for under one seat) and another RC DelTang board & LiPo (for under the other seat) ...

DSC06864 by d.caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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In the area of small closed coaches

DSC04654 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC04653 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC00338 by d.caso, on Flickr

but -don't know why (...)- I keep avoiding this type

DSC01276 by d.caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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Wonderful, somewhere in this bunch of coaches, I should be able to find inspireation for my open coaches. Thank you Daniel, for posting the photos.
Larry G

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Great that you like them, Larry.
:old dude:One of the for me most appealing aspects of the minor gauges is the Law of Proportional Improvisation:  'the smaller the gauge the bigger the freedom to improvise'. And that must (at least should) be valid also at 'Appetite Mine'. :us:
Daniel

Last edited on Sun Jul 15th, 2018 03:27 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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A posible railtruck for the island

DSC06364 by d.caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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DSC00707 by d.caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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Back to the coaches:

P1650048 by d.caso, on Flickr

P1650037 by d.caso, on Flickr

P1650031 by d.caso, on Flickr

The following were (I regret it now) built to fit the 200mm radius curves at "PONDÉZAR". They were silly cannibalized laser kits of my first design (as the blue one riding at Mogollon Ry.) and now destined to a not too visible scrap yard or something like that

DSC00777 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC00825 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC00808 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC00774 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01117 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01050 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01020 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01019 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01014 by d.caso, on Flickr


DSC01481 by d.caso, on Flickr


DSC01011 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01692 by d.caso, on Flickr


As you see, they were never finished.The roof ends -specialy the composite curve of the needed roof end trim-  were a party of headaches but then I started "ROCHEFORT" and both layouts were chopped (luckily!) before the need to complete those coaches came.


Daniel

Last edited on Mon Jul 16th, 2018 07:39 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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Your coaches look nicely finished to me.

One of the reasons I choose a mining theme for my layout, was the rough and tumble nature of such an operation. Refinement would be out of place in such a setting. This gives me an excuse for being a bit sloppy with my modeling. That said, when tracks finally reach the town (lower deck) things will become more refined, I hope.

Larry G

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Daniel, and then there was this one:
The blue coach suffered from the Texas sun but I have another, blue & white.
            Woodie

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Larry
That was also my choice, pushed by my nickname Magoo (= not exactly eagle eyed).But, as we know (and now also the Croats), the French have always been known by their refinement ...:)
P2020337 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
... and, as you've said, approaching the villages the local aesthetic expectations increase very fast.  :us:
Daniel

Last edited on Mon Jul 16th, 2018 02:04 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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Woodie
Yes, I remember very well that now green 'unicum' pulled by your old friend because IT HAD to arrive in time for your birthday.

But when I said 'blue' I was thinking the blue with white window frames you can see in this photo ... if you are fast enough because the train is running unusually fast today:
:2t:


Daniel

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And this is what I call Texan Rairoad Modeling Poetry:


P2020338 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

W C Greene
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This old girl?
The other coach (all blue with white window frames) is still around but she's in sad shape due to the hellish Texas weather she endured for a long time.PS:as the wizard warned Dorothy..."Don't look behind the curtain, or under the layout!" Woodie

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Well, as I've commented about your layout, if God gets so jealous that uses his powers (and his time) to destroy what we have made that is a bit of an honor. Isn't it?

You know the memory function of my lonely brain cell is no more what it used to be...but I can't remember seeing that green/white coach before...!!!

Mogollon's underworld was as fascinating as the upperworld!!!
I have learnt from you a sense of modeling impunity that I hope to keep with me until the end.


Daniel

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Another image of the coming French coaches.

(Yes, I know it suggest some French 'messieurs' riding among the folks of Mogollon but it is from a very French area.)

P2020329 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


http://www.inventaires-ferroviaires.fr/hd17/17306.1.pdf

Daniel

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Well, the drawings for the new Magoo-proof tender skeleton is done.

P2020341 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

As you see, the new version has at the lower edge of both sides an 8mm wide leap for taking the 8mm X 8mm brass strips

P2020340 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Also the drawing for the new underframe is done

P2020343 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

but this time with special locating blocks for glueing the brake shoes in the right places and angles without any ris

P2020344 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020345 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Next photo shows the four (two for the tender and two for the loco) brake shoes

P2020347 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

They are connceted to the frame by a tiny sprue to avoid Shapeways charging for the numbher of separate parts they must search in the supporting powder after printing.

P2020348 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Both, the skeleton for the two bodies and the underframes are already ordered and will be here at the begin of next week.

Daniel

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Your under frame looks to be a good one for ore cars too. Can any one order some from your design?

Larry G

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Larry

I don't sell through Shapeways.
I do sell every now and then something to friends but just at cost, no for earning money.

I can order for you as many as you want if you can Paypal me the cost including post
Then I place the order and give Shapeways your address so there is no need to pay extra posting costs.
But, before you decide, I want to take a look because I think I have four or so of such underframes that had the wrong wheelbase for the BullAnt boguies(my error at making the drawings).

Have you noticed they are only cosmetic and have not holes for taking the axles?

I will post later -in an hour or so- another message with photos of the ones I have.

Daniel

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Larry

But if you prefer I csan also adapt the drawing before ordening so what you get will take pin-point (or other) wheelsets.
Just let me know.

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So here we go

There are two with the longer wheelbase (27,5mm).
They were printed from different drawings and in different materials.
The dark one is printed in FUD and doesn't have the bar connecting the axleboxes. But it has a pair of brake shoes.

The light one is printed in WS&F, has no brake shoes bnut has the connecting bars

P2020353 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The other two have a shorter wheelbase (24mm), have the connecting bar and have also the skeleton for a floor platform to be mounted. They are both printed in WS&F.

P2020352 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


Next photo compares the two wheelbases
P2020354 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

If you can wait until I get the new ones (so I am sure I really won't the two now under the tenders) there will be another two (six in total).

All for free but you pay the poosting costs.
In case you want them you should send me a PM with your address so I can ask at the postofice for the cost so you know before deciding.

Daniel

Last edited on Tue Jul 17th, 2018 07:21 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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A surviving French 500mm and 600mm gauges industrial line

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZ0LHbzobqE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iu00w9AJMJY
https://vimeo.com/138979411


Daniel

Last edited on Tue Jul 17th, 2018 10:41 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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New image of my old love:

P2020365 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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...and my second love:

P2020367 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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Smallest compound ever?
Jose.

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Not sure, José.May be the small O&K's are even smaller. 
 http://www.feldbahn-ffm.de/media/images/ffm_lok_13.jpg https://www.google.nl/search?q=smallest+Orenstein+%26+Koppel+Mallet+locos&rlz=1C1EODA_nlNL771NL771&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj7o_aBgqvcAhUMZFAKHZd5At8QsAQILQ&biw=1530&bih=782 Daniel

Last edited on Thu Jul 19th, 2018 11:07 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

Larry G
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You have posted a fantastic collection of locmotive photos here. 
 This one caught my eye.It runs very near my home, here in the Black Hills. My wife and I saw this loco running just yesterday. And then parked in the same spot as in this photo. Larry G

Attachment: images.jpeg (Downloaded 104 times)

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Lucky you...!!!

That is an impressive an beautiful loco but seeing it running...WOW...!!!


Daniel

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It has been silente here for a while.

Partly because it has been and is still too hot for what we are used to here.
But I have a little news.
First the bad ones:

The redesigned tender underframe 3D prints arrived today.
One half spoiled by the machine's mania of dragging the rivets from the drawing (se the right end in the photo)

P2020577 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

...and the other one...Well, you can see:


P2020578 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

But the people at Shapeways has already arranged to replace them by new prints.

The good news are also a lot:

Again from Skapeways, the prints of the new two tender skeletons perfectly printed.
As you see, the new Magoo friendly tenders are going to have along both sides floor supports for taking two solid brass weights but also a considerable biggere top opening so a bigger battery can be installed

P2020595 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020596 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020597 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020598 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Also the brass arrived ("...yesterday ... I think..." say my lonely brain cell.)
The 2mm X 50mm one is for making new, one piece tender floors. The 4mm plate is for replacing with increassed weight the 'wooden' buffers. (Both plates are 50mm width.)

P2020601 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Again from Shapeways, the 3D printed table frames for a restaurant terrace to come

P2020599 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020600 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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There is a bit more, still at the virtual world:

I know it is all pretty charicatural but I must compromise with all three: the limited Sketchup (free version) capabilities, the limits of the printing materials and, the worse of all, my own limitations; but it is going to be inside the cab and the tender will help me to hide some of the horrors...

P2020585 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020586 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020587 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020589 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020592 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020593 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020594 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The drawing is not ready yet but if I am lucky at solving the errors will be uploaded to Shapeways tomorrow.

------------

I have been working also on the drawings for a covered van ionspired in the TPT ones but after successfully uploading it to Shapeways Mr. Wallet started to show serious depression symptom so I am redoing the design so that, instead of printed ones, laser engraved boarda(by our fellow Teetrix) already at the island will lower Mr W. symptom and, carefullt weathered will also look much better.


Daniel

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The good Shapeways prints are first class Daniel but the bad ones are horrors! Good that they have agreed to reprint.

And the backhead and firebox end look very good. No horrors that I can see.

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Exactly as you say it, Doug.

Everytime I claimed about the cuality of a print they made a new one at no cost, so I must say they have re-gained my trust about that.

Now the good news:
The backhead drawing is uploaded and has been approved.
Printed in what they call "Professional Plastic" it's cost is 11,17euro.
But before ordering I want to add what I think is called 'turret' and also the reverse lever and the brake handle

20120816_153759 by d.caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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As those with some understanding of 3D drawing will laugh as crazy seeing how shameless my ignorance can be when I really want something.
BUt it is as it is so it's o.k. for me.
So here a little more 'progress':


Here the little monster

P2020623 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020625 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020624 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Remember it is going to be inside the cab and followed by a wood loaded tender

At first I thought ordering thge prin ting so

P2020618 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020615 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020616 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020617 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020619 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

but then Mr. Wallet woke up and pushed me to compromise in order to get the volume of the printing smaller in order to avoid 'terrifying tensions' in his nervous system, so we got this:

P2020620 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

-------------

This is something else but I MUST model a scene with it at work in a street surrounded by the public

P2020456 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


Daniel

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Clever use of space inside the backhead Daniel.

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Well, thank you but it was actually Mr. W. idea! :bg:

It is already uploaded to Shapeways and approved (...but I want to order also another small thing so MUST wait until Mr. W. starts snoring. With a 32C day he will certainly have a siesta.:time: )

Daniel

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http://heskethscalemodels.com/ourshop/prod_4874314-Baldwin-Gas-Machanical-135-Scale-165mm-gauge.html

(Yes, I saw the link...But still... Killing Mr. W is not a sane way of doing things, Daniel... :us: ...)


:bang::bang::bang::bang:

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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This is how the work on the covered van kit is progressing.

The design of all parts (actually they are only three) is almost done

P2020626 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

I say 'almost' because two of them -the doors and the body ends- have been siuccesfully uploaded to Shapeways but the sides are, still after 13 (yes, thirteen) times needing some corrections.

For someone with more understanding of computers and drawing it would be just a joke, but I am reaching my patience's limits and if it is not completed today it will stay waiting for better days.

Anyway here what is done:

All three parts have a recess at their backs so they will take an 1mm thick ply or styrene for simulating the board panels

P2020629 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020628 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020630 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020631 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020632 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020633 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020638 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020637 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020639 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020640 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020641 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020643 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

More in next message (because I have no idea of how many photos will a single message take.)

Daniel

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P2020644 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020645 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020646 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020647 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020648 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020649 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

More in a moment.

Daniel

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This is the backside of the doors but also sides and ends are designed the same way (to take 1mm panels)

P2020650 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020654 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020651 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020652 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Of course, there will be scribed 'board'panels but these are just to show how it's done.

P2020655 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020656 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The floor is again 1mm thick scribed (laser) board. The floors will go glued to shortened Fleischmann Magic Train underframes.

The end panels need to be cut withg a curved top and also a vindow opening must be cut.
The frame of the window has also a recess for taking a piece of fine mesh.

P2020657 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020658 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020659 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020660 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

More in next message

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Magoo & Wallet Car Co. has serious reasons for designing the body in parts instead of the more usuel
one piece body

Mr W. insists that piling the more or les flat parts for several wagons occupies less volume than printing a single full body version of same wagon.

Mr Magoo doesn't really care about that but he insist flat parts piled with the most fine detail up would ensure there wion't be any traces of layering there.

So you see, they really make a good team:

P2020662 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020661 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

(Anyway both are going to get mad when they come to know that at least four or five of these vans are going to be ordered and they all require accurate panel cutting & gluing. But, PLEASE, don't tell them yet!!!)


Daniel, fried in 32C Amsterdam

Last edited on Thu Jul 26th, 2018 12:01 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

slateworks
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Excellent Daniel. You my be reaching the limit of your patience but I wouldn't even be able to start something like this! I have the same disability with 3D drawing systems as you say you do with computers in general! :doh::bang::bang::bang::bang:

Last edited on Thu Jul 26th, 2018 01:24 pm by slateworks

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Thank you Doug.
To make the long story short: some people's modeling -you for example- would be spoiled by too much technology. You simply don't need it and Updah shows it clearly.
In my case, playing with all that designing thing may be a compensation for my inability to get trains running.
May be I'll find a way to learn to do good CAD drawing in both, 2D and 3D, so when I get really REALLY old (am 'just' 67 at the moment) and my modeling skills start to vanish I will be able at least to design some good kits for friends and for myself.If I get a chance to combine laser cutting and 3D printing I could make a number of interesting things...
In the mean time I keep doing what I have been doing since I woke up some years ago: enjoying what is as much as I can... (Well...I still need to find a way to 'enjoy' today's 32C and the still increasing temperature announced for the next couple of days...) 
Daniel

Last edited on Thu Jul 26th, 2018 02:42 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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Howdy Daniel, To me (just my lowly opinion) it might be FAR easier to get out some stripwood, razor saw, Xacto knife, and glue and build these things rather than fret over CAD drawings and computer mumbo-jumbo. But then you might realize that I like the feeling of cutting wood VS downloading photos.

As ol' Herbie would say...
"We're all Luddites down here!"

Woodie

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Woodie

Of course you are right and I would do so if I would be modeling American with it's beautiful wooden ... everything.
But this is a French island which means stone & iron everywhere.

But one or the other day you may be surprised: I saved my first 1/32 module -may be youy recall: the two tracks steam loco shed with the two working wagon turntables and the diesel repair shed... and I keep it two step[s from me so if one day I need a pause from the French world I'll have a holiday in that latinamerican module where it will be plenty of wood... :old dude:

That said, I must add I really love these vans with their rusty iron skeletons and a mad visual song for rivet counters... :glad:


Daniel

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Thistles are a marvelous material.

This is some I've found some time ago and have been hanging up-side down since then in order to dry without becoming brittle or loosing (too much of) their natural fresh colors.

P2020774 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020775 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

After removing from the twig they show what looks as a hole but is not even 1mm deep

P2020777 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

so I used the dremell for drillng a holes

P2020778 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020779 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020789 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020792 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020798 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Then I remembered the Greekeeper (static grass applicator) and dcided it may be time to start the learning curve.

So I made this spraying cheap glue on it and then adding short static grass. Finally a bit of spray glue again and the 'flowers'were spraid by hand

P2020805 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

I also made another version

P2020803 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and now I will start learning to model usinng the grass applicator.

Daniel

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'Nothing gets lost.Everything keeps transforming.'

Those thistels provided very nice contorted twigs that were screamingf to become a tree armature

P2020808 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

I glued three twigs (that was all I had but now, knowing, I'll get a bag of those thistles soon.) using hot glue

P2020809 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and then added a bit of acrylic modelling paste to fill an a bit too hollow gap.

I also made a hole for insering a rod (using the maximum speed of the Dremel made the surprisingly very hard wood -probably also the drill bit...- to burn and the smell was just delicious!!!)

P2020810 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and I liked it so sprayed a bit of black + gray + light beige

P2020818 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Those curly very thin 'wires' you see are incredibly strong and will provide very nice scale'twigs' for the foliage.

P2020821 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020821 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020827 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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P2020837 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020840 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020841 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020842 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020843 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020845 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020846 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020847 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020848 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020849 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020850 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020851 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020854 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020854 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020855 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020856 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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This looks exactly a Decauville switch lever. I am not sure it is because in many Spanish railways there were plenty of stuff -from things as this to bogie coaches- with an absolute Decauville look but made (or just sold?) by other companies.
But the photo show clearly the standard Decauville design.

P2020836 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

Last edited on Sun Jul 29th, 2018 07:07 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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Thi seems to be an interesting company for 1/35 scalers:

https://www.hansasystemsusa.com/

(But Magoo couldn't glue those separate window glasses without making a real mess... :us: )

Daniel

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DSC07057 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC07058-001 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC07060 by d.caso, on Flickr

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First steps at using the Greenkeeper app;licator are done.
I notice there is really PLENTY to learn and also that Magoo is having issues because can't see what he is doing -that'snot new- but can't perceive the results until he sees the enlarged photos. Those super thin fibers are science fiction for him!

Anyway here thge results of the first dedicated session

I started with the packing material I collected from Shapeways posts some time ago. Sadly, they replaced it later by air bubbles plastic. But my nose made me build up a provission in time.
This is it:

P2020938 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

it is about 1" thick but one can peel very easily layers in any desired thickness:

P2020939 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020940 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


John Vogelaar warned me about the advantage of mixing and also superpossing grass lengths, colors and tones so I tried to play a bit with that just to conclude it has an own learning curve. Not for the mix of colors or tones but because the constant change of color, tones and kengths that means every time opening the applicator, removing the rests of previous grass, puting in the next one and closing the applicator.
Also I must become a bit more disciplined at using during the full session a paper mask permanently because both, the fibers and the spray glue.
I try to do most of the spray glue inside the spray booth but... You know Mrs. Impatience is always around here...

:us:

First thing I wanted to avoid was the parrot colors as these

P2020915 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

(The above photo has a serious color manipulatrion just to give and idea of what I mean)

The good news is with a little care, mixing & superpossing colors and tones makes not necesary to correct the colors with airbrush as I used to do...Well, not completelly but still...

P2020916 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020918 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020921 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020922 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020923 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020924 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020925 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020926 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020927 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020928 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


P2020929 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

To get the soft grayish tones I had learnt to use black acrylic inkt diluted in a lot of water but now I like this method a lot more (I hate cleaning the airbrush... Specially when I forgot to do it the time before...!!!:bang: )

More in a moment.

Daniel

Last edited on Mon Jul 30th, 2018 07:07 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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The reasons why I like the packing material as base are

1)
One can give it any color I want with cheap spray paint.

2)
Can take a piece of it without getting a base of paper, plastic or whatever unrealistic edges.

3)
Because it's structure, one can ensure the 'ground' -if and where visible through the grass- will be the real one of the area one is working on. 

4)
It keeps Mr. Wallet happy because I've got plenty of it for free.:2t:
P2020930 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020931 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020933 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020936 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
Mme Edith kindly agreed to pose for the photos and thus give an idea of the dimensions of the greenery around (she is a Preiser 1/32 figure but, please, don't tell her!)
P2020954 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2020956 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr 
 More in a moment.


Last edited on Mon Jul 30th, 2018 06:47 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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P2020951 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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P2020945 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020947 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020948 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020944 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020942 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020941 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020943 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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I was afraid using a static grass applicator would mean everywhere an militarily standing grass but -by accident, of course- I've found that one can also regulate that: using a smaller grid ensures every single grass will stand in salute but using a 'too big one for that size of grass' ensures much more realistic variations.

I have also learnt that it is a lot less boring work if one ensures at every step -with each length, color or tone of grass- many pieces are done so later one have a selection of pre-prepared material in different stages.

Now I go back to continue playing with my new toy.

Daniel

W C Greene
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Daniel, that's a great link-Hansa- for 1:35 details. I will look at their site more later. The availability of "proper" 35 scale doors is what got me...I am tired of modifying 1:48 doors anyway.
Thanks again.

Woodie

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Woodie

Yes, doors and windows was what atracted me too. But I don't think I'd be able to convince Magoo to glue those individual glasses...
And, even if I could, I couldn't convince Mr. Wallet to pay for it!!!

It's hard to be a passionate but poor modeler in this world!!! :us:


Daniel

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Well, while I wait that the new 3D printed tender frames arrive I have made the two new tender floors.
It's again 2mm thick brass but this time all in one pice.
Well, almost nmot!

P2020965 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

This you get when you use the little Proxxon table saw as a milling machine but have no patience for determining the places and installing a set of blocks forming a jig so you must do the milling blindly.
See the other side:

P2020966 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

but don't worry, those cuts will be filled with solder and anyway nothing of it will remain visible once the riveted floor plate has been added.

Not counting the battery (or batteries), the tender weights 209gram but if needed another 100 grams could be added withgout affecting the room for the battery.

P2020961 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020969 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

This time the screws are nicely placed symmetrically.

Four for securing the tender body and four for securing the motor boguie

P2020963 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

If needed, the battery can protrude some 10mm above the tender top. A good load of wood will be enough to hide a battery of (max.) 18mm X 30mm X 55mm.

P2020967 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

When I mentioned de weight I forgot the tender will have also both buffer beams made of 4mm thick solid brass.
The ones in next photo and also the tender body are just for the photo but will depart to the scrapyard as soon as I make the new ones (Probably tomorrow.)

I assume with something as 250 to 300 grams weight the tender will make possible to run the loco with a 12 axle train without problems.

Daniel

Last edited on Mon Jul 30th, 2018 08:31 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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A Couillet little beauty from Spain

P2030006 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


A more traditional one:

P2030009 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

----------

Some rolling stock with chances at the island

P2020991 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020995 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2020996 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

-----------

Finaly a really small dredge for my old project!!!

P2020998 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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I wanted to change my signature and replace it by a photo. But couldn't find a way to do so.
Still, in case you want to know who are you talking to here, this is I at work:

P1890258-001 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

Last edited on Tue Jul 31st, 2018 02:13 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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These photos are old. They show scenes at "PONDÉZAR" an already chopped layout. But most of the rolling stock survived and will be -some with modifications- running here at the island

To begin with, there is the track laying train with it's rail cutting machine, the rail bender wagon, the rail punching device, a flat wagon for transport of rails & sleepers, another flat for transporting portable track and a tiny workshop wagon

DSC02620 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02694 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02697 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02769 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02652 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02697 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02678 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02694 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


Just in case you think I was being stoned or so:

Image0590-2 by d.caso, on Flickr

Image0590-1 by d.caso, on Flickr

Image0589 by d.caso, on Flickr

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... and here the work 'caboose':

DSC02769 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02805 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02807 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02810 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02811 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02838 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02901 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02839 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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I was posting this message when suddenly the whole street had no electricity. The only time it happened the in 40 years since I am here. So I am not claiming but it is really weird it happenned exactly when I was posting the photos below!

DSC02966 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02859 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02861 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02871 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02879 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02881 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02896 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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Magoo, Caso & S. Wallet Wagon Co.

DSC03598 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03593 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03594 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03595 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03596 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03706 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03707 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03708 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03709 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03714 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03715 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03717 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03718 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

All the small parts are 3D printings made in FUD by Shapeways after my own draings

DSC03719 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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DSC03721 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


DSC03720 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03734 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03739 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Of course, the little wagons are too light and will get one day lead at their underside...

DSC03740 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Mr. Magoo said he wouldn't even thing about using real hook couplers; Mr Caso said it would be a lot of work too and Mr S. Wallet said no way he would allow to spend money on N scale ( or any other) authonmatic couplers so the only alternative was only a Kadee at each end of the trains ... if really REALLY needed

DSC03763 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03764 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03766 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03768 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03771 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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Daniel, thank you for posting such inspiring photos.:2t:Larry G

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Thank YOU, Larry, for taking the time to look at my work.

:2t:

Daniel

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Daniel Osvaldo Caso wrote: DSC03596 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on FlickrBeautiful work as ever Daniel and a great advantage of running RC is that you don't even need to clean the crud off those wheels! :2t:

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Doug:

That I have heard a decenia ago and was immediately convinced... just I am still waiting to see whatever running on my tracks without my hand doing the locomotive's job!!!

But is seems this year is going to happen ...:pop:


Daniel

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DSC03560 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03561 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03562 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03563 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03564 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03566 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03568 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03570 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03571 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03572 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03573 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03575 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC03578 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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DSC03670 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02615 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02613 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

DSC02614 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The last one is a jewel because it's simplicity. I think it can be modeled with the removable sides without problems

DSC02617 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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At the "I DON'T KNOW WHY AM I DOING THIS" front I've made some time ago a pair of different pine trees. I don't need any of such but...(Just my usual nonsense)

P2020284 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

As you have probably heard in the news, the Netherlands is suffering the strongest and longest heat wave ever. And, yes, even for myself, sounds as saying the Arab Emirates are getting short of sand but water is becoming much too scarce here.
Because that, nature is pretty confused and plenty of young trees are dying, whole areas of grass that should be intense green are just light ocker and the ground in and around the woods is full of fallen leaves as if it would be autumn.
The-sorry- good side is flowers are at their very best (also if for a very short time) and types of grasses are revealing an unusual premature dryness that doesn't escape even the modeler's eyes of Mr. Magoo.

Yesterday I've found a different type of grass that, if I would need pine trees for my layout would be my favourite.
From there this third, absolutelly unnecessary pine tree.


I used the trunk of one of the previous trees and sprayed the amazing strong grass with a too parrot green because was the only one Mr. Wallet alowed me to spoil in something so useless.But the can had not much so I needed to be very thrifty to paint enough grass for a more or less full tree.
That is why you'll notice there are too many places showing the original light ocker grass.
But it is just ... whatever, here it is

P2030014 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030015 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030016 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030018 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Just to give a better idea (Mr. W. doesn't know) I painted a small bunch of grass in a better green:

P2030019 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030020 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

... and I really like it more:


P2030021 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

-----------

Back to the "DANIEL: MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS" front:

The two tender skeletons have got their weight, theislotaing strips of wood to support the piece of card where the batteries will rest, and the floor 2mm plate

P2030022 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030023 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and also the dummy locos have now their frames so building the body can start

P2030024 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Because the retaining plate of the mechanism was originally secured by four small screws into the gearbox now removed, I must make an alternative way of keeing it in place:

P2030025 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and also the front of the loco and the rear of the tender have now a strong bracket for holding the couplers

P2030026 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

In the mean time Shapeways say both, the new tender underframes, the backheads and the turrets will be, in principle, posted comming Tuesday the 7th so I hope to have them here by Thursday or Friday.

Daniel

Last edited on Thu Aug 2nd, 2018 09:53 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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I forgot:

This is the grass as found

P2030027 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

You will notice there are two different 'stages' in it's drying process:

P2030028 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030029 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
It is by far the toughtest type of grass I have ever seen.


Daniel

Last edited on Thu Aug 2nd, 2018 10:01 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

slateworks
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If your grass branches stood upwards rather than down, your new tree would be a good representation of the monkey puzzle tree.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=monkey+puzzle+tree&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi37faTls7cAhUkDsAKHTLsDo0Q_AUICigB

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I don't think so.I know Araucarias very good because is a common tree in Argentina but I don't see any similarity at all. At least if you are not talking 1:1000 scale...:us:
Daniel

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I hate Shapeways at least as much as I like it.
After receiving a message announcing the date I'll receive the print of the backheads now I get one saying I am going to receive the money back because some details are too thin and therefore not printable. You will laugh if you would see what is the specific problem!!!
But I will make the backhead by hand as good as Magoo's eyes alow me to and that's it.


--------------


Doug:

I think you see the grass a lot thgicker than it is.
The little standing plants in next photos are done with rests of that grass an a little flock added

P2030033 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030035 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030039 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030040 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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Yes, I guess you're correct Daniel. I was over ambitiously comparing this

P2030018 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

with this.

1200-482446703-foliage-of-monkey-puzzle-tree by slateworks, on Flickr

Not the same I agree.

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:doh:

That must be 'Origami' ... !
My photo was taken as near the twigs as possible therefore the distortion.
Daniel

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NOw, some of you know that running trains, switching and all that is not among my priorities.
My focus is no building the scene as credible as possible and a running train with static people, animals vehicles and trees feels to that as a kind of selfsabotage.
That is the main reason of my reluctance and not my nevertheless real inability at building decent locos.

I know, Woodie, Doug and others find that heretsies but still.

Anyway, after an intermitent insistence of more than seven years, the time is approaching the moment when the so long announced Couillet locos will be running.
In that direction here another little steps.
IMy plan was to make the new buffer beams in solid brass so to add weight to the motorized tenders. But first, there is no need because the solid brass bars and the posibility of adding more makes it unnecessary and, second, because solid brass buffers in the dummy loco would undo the effects of the tender. Making only the tender ones in brass and the loco ones in wood would mean a lot of extra work. So here the all wooden buffers for locos and tenders:

P2030063 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030064 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030069 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030070 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030071 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The buffer ends will be 3D printed in two versions together with other cab parts

This is the simpler version as in the locos at Zaragoza

P2030079 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and this is the more elaborated version as seen in most photos

P2030082 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Is also ready the drawing for the reverse lever

P2030077 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030076 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

But with the still bitter taste left by the fiasco with the backheads order I need to convince first myself about ordering again from Shapeways.

Daniel

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Another doubt arising now is about couplers.

I know old Kadee #5 is really realiable and I also know Magoo will hate me every time a loco or wagon must be uncoupled or, even worse, coupled. But as said, I am not really motivated by running trains and I like a lot more my own, cheap , very strong version of a Decauville L&P coupler

P2030055 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030056 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030060 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030057 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The link would be simply a rusty piece of iron wire bent in U.
For uncoupling a simple wood stick with a timny strong magnet will do. Coupling ... Well...I don't know... May be some kind of double funnel... :bang::bang::bang:


Daniel

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Watching.

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That has been my idea too.  Just an upside down U.  Eliminates the three working parts, those are for photos only, not operations.  I hadn't thought about rare earth magnets and steel though.  Good idea!  I'll have to give that a shot.
:thumb:

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Ken
And so do I, after hearing you're back at the workbench!
Can't wait to see what your new creations.
Welcome back, dear friend!!!
Daniel

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Steven
There have been done several serious experiments by fellow modelers. I couldn't quote any specific one now but I am sure a search in the net would provide plenty.I know there is even a firm offering ready to go magnetic coupling system.
But, as said before,  my focus is not om running trains but on getting a bit convincing images... :Crazy: :bang::us:

Daniel

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Hewre you go:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sf4MVQKaIRA

But I've seen a lot more done.

Daniel

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B.t.w.: here good news from Arnoud
https://www.decauville.nl/

You get the English or German version clicking on the flags.(I tried to post the direct link but is not working.)

Daniel

Last edited on Sat Aug 4th, 2018 06:58 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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On the idea of RARE EARTH magnets...I use them to "arm" the reed switches which control on/off on the receivers in my r/c locos. If you get any "normal" tweezers, pliers, razor blades...ANY metal objects anywhere close, the magnets attach to them, even from a distance. Therefore, I made a pair of BRASS tweezers which I use to fetch the little devils off the reed switches when I want to shut the loco off. And being able to grab the magnets and not have to micro-wrestle them does wonders for my "sanity". As someone said-"works for me!"

Woodie

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My doubt about start 'experiplaying' with magnets for couplers is they would have the same limitation as the British prototype WD ones: one couldn't reverse a wagon beause the polarity of the magnets:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPphe-AI8n8

https://www.google.nl/search?q=7mm+scale+chopper+couplings&rlz=1C1EODA_nlNL771NL771&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj-zafypNTcAhWxNOwKHcTiBBAQsAR6BAgCEAE&biw=1536&bih=760

Daniel

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I have a package of the Zamzoodled cast ones. They are really beautiful jewels. But a French railway MUST have at least a couple of wagon turntables somewhere so wagons must allow to be coupled from both ends...


https://www.zamzoodled.co.uk/products/round-couplers-4-pairs


Daniel

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O.k., WS&F is the cheapest materila but looks too rough. But I can print them in the new Professional Plastic which would be much stronger than FUD...

They are just put in place without any kind of washers or centering device and they should protrude a couple of mm more but is only for seeing how wouldd each version look

I am thinking to let the body mounted type and include in the prints a buffer mounted bracket. It would have a hole at the back and the wooden buffer as well so a centering flexible thin rod would ensure proper alignement.

What do you think?

Daniel

P2030095 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030094 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030092 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030093 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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Daniel, In my humbug opinion, I might suggest using the Lincoln Penn couplers! Yeah, yeah...the Kadees work just fine and all that, BUT the look of real antiques can't be beat and their operation can be a bit of a pain but you'll get used to it. A bit of rusty paint and you will never go back.

Woodie-still operate with L & P's

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Thank you, Woodie.
You are right.Specially for me with no real desire of running trains but a heart for convincing scenes and images.Still, I will redesign the couplers to be printed in Professional Plastic (which is still strong and can be printed in thickness down to 0,4mm and therefore allows finer detail) but also give them a Kadee compatible fixing shape so, if one day 'the running trains fever' bites me, I'll still have the chance to switch to ol good #5.
Daniel

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https://www.flickr.com/photos/alfav8/albums/72157613292538107

Daniel

Larry G
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Daniel, love the Decauville O-4-OT, my kind of loco. Looks to be about 2' gauge. Where is this little beauty located. 
Larry G

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Larry

That is Sandstone Estates, in Southafrika.
They have an amazing collection of beautifully restored locos as the Lawley (I've posted today about in Magoo & Wallet thread.


Daniel

Last edited on Wed Aug 8th, 2018 07:37 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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http://forum.e-train.fr/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=33062

Daniel

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Only for those who dare to keep clicking even while getting cramps on their fingers:

http://ruedeslumieres.morkitu.org/apprendre/transport_pierre/


Daniel

Last edited on Wed Aug 8th, 2018 09:47 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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Three pages thread on European n.g. bumpers

http://forum.e-train.fr/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=14329

Daniel

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http://forum.e-train.fr/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=57145

Daniel

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https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k6126365/f169.image

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k6126365/f177.image

Daniel

Last edited on Fri Aug 10th, 2018 09:24 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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Even better:

http://forum.e-train.fr/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=52732

Daniel

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You probably know Fleischmann Magic Train (NEM) coupler system...

P2030235 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and the Kadee contribution...

P2030234 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

As I would like to give L&P couplers a serious try and have 19 Magic Train car frames (9 of them shortened) with their standard NEM couplers I thought I could give a fitting L&P a try. So here the drawing already uploaded to Shapeways...

P2030223 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030224 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030225 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030228 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030229 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030230 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030232 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030233 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

... but now, seeing the photos, I realize I could spare money if I manage to use the original clips removing the Kadee heads...

Daniel

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P2030236 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030237 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030238 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030239 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030240 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030241 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030242 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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Three pages French thread on building 1/35 16,5mm gauge French rolling stock with many scale drawings and more

http://forum.e-train.fr/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=45862

Daniel

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Bruno Duchesne is one of the best French Modelers I know.
Here his thread on scratchbuilding brass locos in 7mm scale

Daniel

http://forum.e-train.fr/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=42574

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Wow...! It was two weerks ago I posted my last message...!

The reason is I've got the blues.

No, no those but two of these ones

P2030630 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and was forced to enjoy an incredibly boring vacation on them.

But yesterday morning the cause of the blues vanished so today I've got back home and am already swimming in my workbench and no donuts of any kind nor pain killers.

LIfe is beautiful, isn't it?

Photos tomorrow.

Daniel

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Two superintensive work days as revenge for the boring past weeks.

This 50cm X 80cm scene is not part of the current layout but was the first attempt to start with it and remained as an unfinished diorama for a while. Then I bought the static grass applicator and since then the diorama has been an area where to experiment with different things I wanted to try for the layout.
Still, after two days and now a second night of working on it I think it is going to be completed as a diorama that may provide funds for a couple of good mirrors.

The experiment with (super cheap) plastic mirrors is working fine but is a headache to remove them every time for cleaning the traces of my fingers and the pastel powder I am using all around. That won't happen once all the scene is completed but anyway I would prefer real front plated (first surface) mirrors or at least stainless steel ones. But they are far from the reach of my budget so for the time being I must keep using the plastic ones.
There are two different mirrors: one in the tunel going down (left of the scene) and another one in the still uncomplete small street at the higher level. They are easy to see with the eyes but pretty tricky to photograph.


P2030568 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030570 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030571 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030572 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030573 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030579 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030583 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030584 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030584 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030590 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030591 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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P2030592 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030595 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030597 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030599 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030600 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030602 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030605 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030604 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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P2030608 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030609 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030610 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030612 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030615 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030616 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030617 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030619 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030623 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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P2030625 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030627 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030628 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030667 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030668 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030672 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030675 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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P2030676 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030677 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030678 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030679 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030683 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030687 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030692 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030693 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

That was it for today,


Daniel

slateworks
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Beautifully executed Daniel and to think that a large part of this is scribed foam. The atmosphere is palpable.

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Simply magnificent! I can always look at more photos.

Woodie

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Thank you, Doug.It is still all halfway but after so many boring days now being able to model again this little experimental diorama has totally got me.  :-)
Daniel

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Thank you, Master.
I am going to change plenty of it (for example the tree experiment would be great for smaller scales but would need leaves with more body on which Mr. Wallet refuses to invest. :us: so I will probably replace it by my traditional ER-Decor real twigs) but whatever happens you will keep seeing plenty of photos.
Daniel

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Just for making it a bit more confusing, this is not something for the layout nor for the diorama. I just couldn't avoid giving it a try and now I have learn the basics, think I can make something more decent and feel I am grasping the return of my long dormant first 1/32 scale module which wants to be in a plantation...

(Yes, the first photyos are on the layout just to give a better notion of how it looks)

P2030745 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


P2030748 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030749 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030750 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030751 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030751 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

This 1/32 figure will give a good idea of the size

P2030753 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030754 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Now back to the diorama (...or whatever...)

Daniel

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Back to the diorama, here a couple of xamples with other trees (none of them complete yet but still able to give an idea).
They are made with natural materials from ER-Decor.

P2030731 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030734 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030739 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030740 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030741 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030742 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

(I am afraid I must build a strong wooden box with an also strong lid so I can hide the diorama in order to get a rest...It is a tyrant!!!)

Daniel

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Daniel, as before, very inspirational photos. Much info in each one so I have been down loading most of them. 
Larry G

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You are very kind, Larry.
It is great to know it is being a bit inviting.

In case you don't know, there are plenty of photographic 'how too' series in my old Flickr. (Is not the one from where I am posting here)
I am not using it anymore bvecause have lost access (= password and all alternatives) but am still paying for it so it is still all there.

Just in case, here the link:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/daniel_1_32_scale/page223

But take it easy: there are more than twentytwo thousands photos in more than 220 pages!

Daniel

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This link goes to an album in my old Flickr of wich the first 44 photos show how construction of what now has come to be this diorama started:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/daniel_1_32_scale/albums/72157687817837653

Daniel

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A bit more progress this morning
P2030756 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030757 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030758 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030759 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030760 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030763 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
 As you see in some places there are gaps between the lower edges of the buildings and the ground. That will be worked out when the buildings get glued in place.But I must cvomplete each of them before they become one piece
P2030764 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030765 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030766 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030777 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030784 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030768 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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As you see in next images, the back street is all lies.


For example: you see at the back scene a bit of the wooden front of a shop.
It is a lie because it is mirror reflection.
But also what the mirror is reflecting is a lie.
I had a rest of a laser cut shop front from the making of the caffé for "PONDÉZAR" 's high village. Well, that rest has finbd a destiny and doing it's job:

P2030782 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


To improve it's eye-catcher function, the interior of the shop must be enanced with light and may be a figure sitting at the inside behind the window. There will be anyway a table before the window, at the outside, with a small table and an old lady being served. So. in all, the depth illussion will work... I hope!

P2030783 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030770 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030769 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


As you see, the 'shop'doesn't have even a door, let's stay a complete facade. But , because there will be a lot of work done at the corner of the street, no one will be able to notice (Well, at least if not a member of this forum or a Flickr follower)

P2030772 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030773 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Also de terrace garden will change a lot with small details

P2030774 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

Last edited on Mon Aug 27th, 2018 12:56 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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:2t::2t::2t::apl::apl::apl:

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:slow:... ... ...:boogie:
:wave::wave::wave::wave:
[toast]


(Pst...! Doug: I don't use words because don't want to wake up the 'Blue Brothers'...:us:)
Daniel

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Another bit being made

P2030786 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030787 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030789 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


P2030790 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030791 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030792 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030794 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030796 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030798 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030799 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030801 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Sorry for the extremely poor photos but the camera's lonely brain cell refuses to focus on the foreground and on the background as well. :us:

Thewall is still drying it's first base layer of acrylic paint but will get it's colors later today. And on top plenty of greenery including a couple of huge trees.

Daniel

Daniel

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The base for the corner scene is glued and drying now

P2030804 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030807 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030810 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030815 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030812 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030813 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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P2030822 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030823 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030830 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030831 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030835 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030837 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030838 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

Lee B
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Funny, before my most recent Europe trip, I'd have though those curves and alleys were too tight for reality, but I saw several in France and Spain that looked very similar to your work!

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Daniel, Your stone walls look very convincing. I will need some stone walls on my layou,t so am eager to learn how you embossed your walls.

Also, do you emboss your clay tile roofs too, they look great.

Larry G

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Lee
Yes, compared with the US everything is here 'tiny' and may look 'compressed' for American eyes used to huge spaces, huge gardens, huge cars and so on. I love the 'organic' architecture of the old French, Spanish, Italian and Greek small villages because they where driven by a simple dialog between needs, surroundings and local ingenuity.You may have noticed none of the big French architecture shows up in my scenes. That is because all monumental buildings where conceived as mind dominated designs (concepts) >>> systems where very little is left of that simple organicity, it's human proportions and improvisation.Above having the pleasure of living forty years in Europe, I spend many hours studying specifically the old French popular architecture in sources as Delcampe's website where there are millions of old postcards covering every country in the world.
In case you want to take a look, here the link with the general index (see the small column at the left)
https://www.delcampe.net/fr/collections/search?slug=cartes-postales/france/colombes&categories%5B0%5D=30002
Next link is to de pages dedicated to France
https://www.delcampe.net/fr/collections/search?show_type=all&view_filters=1&view_filters_reminder=1&view=gallery&display_only=ongoing&display_ongoing=ongoing&blacklisted_sellers_included=0&currency=all&exclude_empty_description=0&term=&search_mode=all&excludedCharacters%5B0%5D=%7B&excludedCharacters%5B1%5D=%7D&excludedCharacters%5B2%5D=%5B&excludedCharacters%5B3%5D=%5D&excludedCharacters%5B4%5D=%5E&excludedCharacters%5B5%5D=~&excludedCharacters%5B6%5D=%3A&excludedCharacters%5B7%5D=/&excludedCharacters%5B8%5D=%22&slug=cartes-postales/france/colombes&categories%5B0%5D=713
Next link is to the pages dedicated to railways
https://www.delcampe.net/fr/collections/search?show_type=all&view_filters=1&view_filters_reminder=1&view=gallery&display_only=ongoing&display_ongoing=ongoing&blacklisted_sellers_included=0&currency=all&exclude_empty_description=0&term=&search_mode=all&excludedCharacters%5B0%5D=%7B&excludedCharacters%5B1%5D=%7D&excludedCharacters%5B2%5D=%5B&excludedCharacters%5B3%5D=%5D&excludedCharacters%5B4%5D=%5E&excludedCharacters%5B5%5D=~&excludedCharacters%5B6%5D=%3A&excludedCharacters%5B7%5D=/&excludedCharacters%5B8%5D=%22&slug=cartes-postales/france/colombes&categories%5B0%5D=18416
and the last one dedicated to tramways
https://www.delcampe.net/fr/collections/search?show_type=all&view_filters=1&view_filters_reminder=1&view=gallery&display_only=ongoing&display_ongoing=ongoing&blacklisted_sellers_included=0&currency=all&exclude_empty_description=0&term=&search_mode=all&excludedCharacters%5B0%5D=%7B&excludedCharacters%5B1%5D=%7D&excludedCharacters%5B2%5D=%5B&excludedCharacters%5B3%5D=%5D&excludedCharacters%5B4%5D=%5E&excludedCharacters%5B5%5D=~&excludedCharacters%5B6%5D=%3A&excludedCharacters%5B7%5D=/&excludedCharacters%5B8%5D=%22&slug=cartes-postales/france/colombes&categories%5B0%5D=822
I think Delcampe has also an English version ofthe website.
Daniel

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Hi Larry
Well, it is a lot easier than what you think: all you need is a couple of pieces of foam of different types (I use the ones used for isolation in real buildfings) and a pencil.All you need to do is to draw the stones but making a varying pressuere with the pencil.
Here, in 323 old photos I've posted to the NGRM forum years ago,  some tricks that your eyes, used to decode the silent languages hidden in images, will understand.They are four full pages.Of course, feel free to ask whatever you want to know.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/daniel_1_32_scale/albums/72157688332076741/page1

Some useful things to know:
1)The side of the pencil (= the angle of inclination of the pencil on the foam) is the main tool to shape the surface of the stones if one wants something else than flat front stones.
2)A controlled spray of spray paint on the foam weill 'eat' the material giving it a grainy surface. The more the paint (it's actually the solvents what do the etching) the rougher the result. But WARNING!: I have no idea about the health risks of this method!
3)In the doubt, I discarded the spray method and replaced it for a more secure but also controolable one: pressding pieces of coarse sandpaper onto the foam to get the grainy effect in a range of variations depending the grain of the sandpaper you use and the amount of pressure you apply.In some  cases I like to do that texturing before embossing the stones but other times I preffer the maore delicate, controlable work of pressing on individual stones already embossed.For  some effects as old, rough plasterwork I like to combine several types of sandpaper.
4)This is very important to me: I've found every person has a few unconscious tendencies in the range of movementes of the hands. That may be why we all have a different writing. In my case it's a barely obvious tendency to repeat traces in a slight diagonal inclination and starts to show after embossing a small area.To break that effect, what I do is to rotate 90degree the piece of foam I am embossing after every few stones. That way the effect vanish (actually it doesn't but the 'one direction everywhere' effect is broken and the eyes fooled.
5)To get the illussion of fallen plasterwork on a stone wall I use an  old and simple tyrick: I press with the side of a pencil the boundaries between the stone areas and the remaining plaster. The trick -from ancient 'bas-reliefs' technics- fools de eyes suggesting a recess in the wholes stone area while the recess is only at the edges.
6)COLORINGI use the cheapest -very poor quality- Chines acrylic paint for a 'primer'.Once dry, I start working with good quality dry pastels. (I use mostly Talen's 'REMBRANDT' range which is a bit expensive but really great quality. (In some cases I would love to use the more expensive (German)  'SCHMINCKE' ones but when I start thinking about it Mr. Wallet starts barking...:us:)
ROOF TILE
I am not sure but think you mean the 'Spanish tile' roofs.If so: no, they are plaster castings made from a mold I've got from a now long out of production beautiful roof panel resin castings made by "MK-35" (a French company offering a range of 1/35 and 1/48 scales castings).I contacted the company years ago but they said there were not going to produce such roofs again.I borrowed the original from Rudy Hess (an amazing Dutch modeller) for making the mold. The good news is I have also sent a mold to Woodie so you may ask him a cheap plaster casting so you can make your own silicone rubber mold and get as many castings as you like. :2t:

I hope this will help but, again, feel free to ask whatever you want.
Daniel

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Some needed explanations

IN the above album link you will find a couple of photos showing this type of work

6 11 2011 080 by d.caso, on Flickr

It is a traditional intent to kill two birds with one shot but it kills three: the third dead bird is the credibility of the wall you are modeling.
See the difference with a wall where the complete outline of each stone is being drawn individually: 
6  11  2011 082 by d.caso, on Flickr
That is the cornerstone of a convincing model: one can fool de eye but not the awareness.
Daniel

Last edited on Tue Aug 28th, 2018 06:29 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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And after posting the last above photo (taken years ago) I notice nowit shows the traces of my hand's tendency to repeat certain things: you will see too many stones have the same type of effect in their lower lleft corner.
That is why I've learnt to turn the workpiece around 90degree again and again.

Daniel

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A couple of a little better images with the curved wall at the background

P2030860 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030861 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030854 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

one of 'the other end of the street with the mirror shop front a bit visible

P2030862 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and a new experiment product of an error

P2030875 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

As you see, the twigs are just glued and the glue is still wet :old dude:

P2030876 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Yes, this new tree is much too big for the scene but is already dictating me a new diorama L:

This twigs are new to me and now, for the first time after the 'Donut' experience, I will go biking a bit and come back with two bags full of these teigs... (I hope!)

P2030879 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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Well, that was 15Km. Not much but being my first cycling after the forced Donut vacation it's not bad at all.

The bad news is I have been unable to localize the plants I wanted. Only found two and brought them but that is more or less as much as I have used for the tree in the previous photos.

Kere the plant:

P2030881 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030883 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Those green things look a bit as leaves but are tiny balls formed for two leaves.
If you lert the whole thing dry for a couple of weeks they doesn't loose the color but become britle and if you roll a bunch of them between your hands the pair of leaves separate making a beautiful foliage for more realistic scale trees.

These are the smashed ones from three weeks ago

P2030886 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030887 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

This is a small twig with the leaves gently removed by pulling them all at once with the hand

P2030899 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

This is the same twig but with adhesive sprayed on and the new foliage

P2030901 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Next is the same foliafe but applied to the armature from other type of plant

P2030888 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

and next one of the individual 'plants' from the above

P2030891 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

The next photos show little twigs from a similar armature but with a lot of foliage

P2030905 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030894 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030904 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030895 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

And now I go for my lunch!!!

Daniel

Last edited on Tue Aug 28th, 2018 11:40 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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Thank you for all the great info, Daniel. I'll look for the type of foam seen in your photos. Stone retaining walls are very common in the mountain towns here in the Black Hills.

Larry G

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Larry

My pleasure.
Great if it helps.

99% depends on how do you en-joy (= how you invest your 'joie de vivre' in whatever you do) and just a tiny 1% on knowledge and skills.

Don't spoil your time searching for a specific type of foam. Just go to Walmart or whatever you have in your area and ask for the isolation foams used in real buildings. Then see what they have and select the ones your nose and yoiur fingers advice you to buy.
Ask before you buy for the ones that can be cut with heat. The ones covered with aluminium foil are not.

Modelist's foams are more or less the same, a lot more expensive and there is no advantage except if you need a specific hardness for making the pattern for a mold.

For glueing foam I use PVA glue (common white glue) for tiny pieces but mostly the cheapest silicone kit I am able to find.

I don't use the plastic putty that appears in my photos any more. I switched to the cherapest plaster available because is more foamn firendly if you must seal a joint or do other jobs envolving a bit of texturing. While half dry, cheap plaster will take the impressions of sandpaper as foam does so it is easy to camouflate every joint.

I suggest, instead of trying to do something 'right', you give yourself permission to play with the foam and discover the possibilities beforer you start doing something specific.

Daniel

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This is gone already much too far!!!:bang:

It was already bothering that my computer started to laugh everytime I get into the room, even before I turn it on. Now this is the new joke (see photo below):bang:`

P2030925 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


Just to be clear:


P2030925 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Does someone know how can Magoo and I convince thisa d...d computer to get back to normal and stop playing with my lonely brain cell?

Thank you!!!

Danie

Last edited on Wed Aug 29th, 2018 07:00 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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Hi Daniel:go to settings and there check monitor orientation. Choose either portrait (vertical) or landscape (horizontal).Jose.

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Daniel, I'm no expert but try this.

Press and hold the Ctrl and Alt keys while you press the Up arrow. Pressing these keys at the same time should rotate the screen back to the default setting.

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José and Doug

THANK YOU both!!!

I can't believe it but I've got it done and it works!!! :2t:

(...but the d....d thing is still laughing at me!!!???


Daniel

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Computers are here to make your life easier. They also reduce paperwok.
Mr Murphy.

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Well, may be they are there with such intentions but here they are really mean!!! :old dude:

Nevertheless, here today's little progress
P2030927 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030928 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030929 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030931 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030932 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030933 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030934 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030936 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030937 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030938 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030939 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2030940 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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P2030943 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030944 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030945 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030947 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030949 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030950 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030952 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030953 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030954 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030955 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030956 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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http://forum.e-train.fr/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=6144&start=90

Daniel

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https://issuu.com/tombell17/docs/decauville_1897_catalogue

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Scenic masterpiece! :bow::bow::bow::bow::bow:

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Thank you, Doug.I knew your gardener's heart would like it. I am really enjoying making a diorama and Mrs. Impatience is delighted with the fast run from (re)starting to detailing. I hope "Île du Présent" will be also reaching that stage soon.
Daniel

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P2030961 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

After all, even in 1/32 one can get plenty of fun in a tiny space

P2030962 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr



Back to "Ile du Présent"

I am not done yet with trhe diorama but today have been cleaning up the layout so the work to the buildings at the background can be continued. So trees are removed, also the pergola and other stuff, most of the still provisory greenery and so on.

P2030964 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

But suddenly I realized I have an almost completred loco that has been more or less systematically neglected: de little Billard diesel...


P2030967 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030968 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Yes, the roof is not glued in place yet because first the interior must be done. But for that must the body be fastened with screws to the motorized frame, but for that must be first the RC stuuf installed. That will be don by John Vogelaar, hopely before end September.
Nevertheless, the lady wanted to show herself a bit so here some photos

P2030970 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030972 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030977 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030978 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030979 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030980 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030981 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030982 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2030984 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

Last edited on Thu Aug 30th, 2018 04:21 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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And now I recall I have another two slightly different versions of the Billard ready to be built!!!  :glad:
Daniel

Last edited on Thu Aug 30th, 2018 04:24 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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Found in Perú and restored in the UK a beautiful COUILLET for 500mm gauge


http://thestig.co.uk/index?%2Fcategory%2FCHUQUI

http://thestig.co.uk/index?/category/CHUQUI/start-15

Daniel

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http://louisrenault.com/author/admin/page/28/

Some very interesting photos from half the page

Daniel

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Daniel Osvaldo Caso wrote: https://issuu.com/tombell17/docs/decauville_1897_catalogue

Daniel

One guess as to which Tom Bell that is......
Tom

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I suppose is that crazy guy travelling the meter gauge line in Thailand... :slow:
Daniel

Last edited on Fri Aug 31st, 2018 09:56 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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Yes - now I want one of these to travel round them on - pumped by my own personal pumpman.



Tom

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Daniel Osvaldo Caso wrote:











l


Amazing! When I was in France this summer, we stayed in a hotel in Bayeux that had a courtyard that looked almost exactly like that. It was almost that size, too. You re-created that look perfectly!

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Lee

Nice to know that!
Thank you for sharing it.

May be I've got a bit the feeling of the French scene...

Also, the thought that whatever we do is always an image of something real, even if we never have seen it, cross my mind every now and then... Who knows?
:old dude:

Daniel

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Daniel, remember that anything you build has a prototype...somewhere!

Woodie

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Exactly.
It is our little silly mind who wants to believe we are able to add something worth to life but not realizing that by trying to do that it spoils it's only real chance: bringing up simple, true awareness. :old dude:

Daniel

Last edited on Sun Sep 2nd, 2018 05:09 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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...and suddenly Autumn arrived:

P2040292 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2040292 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2040295 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

It is made from twigs of the most 'vulgar' type of thistles you can find everywhere and soon also in the North Pole taped toguether and modeled a bit with acrylic modeling paste.

Then I remember old Chinese used to say "The fall is when next spring begins to prepare" so I

P2040296 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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Then, as always happens, I forgot all plans and started to play a bit with what I had around in the chaos of the workbench.
This is what I've got:

P2040298 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2040299 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2040301 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2040303 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2040304 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2040308 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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This I've found at the Spanish forum

P2040316 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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...and this I've found under a dead plant and have now been drying and washed several times so is claiming is time to get to the island:

P2040321 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2040322 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2040322 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel

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That root is a gem Daniel. Looking forward to seeing what else you make of it.

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Hi Doug

Yes it is!

I think it will be an old tree still growing by the river with some roots touching also in the water...


Daniel

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you seem to have settled quite comfortably in your "new home". beautiful work as always.

s.e.

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S.E.:

Thank you.
Nice to know you like it.
But... How do you mean 'new home'?

I was only for a week and a half in another place (not a real vacation but the way to avoid unnecessary pain going and coming back every two days to the hospital) and am back in my old after that.
But yes, I feel very comfortable here. Mainly because Mr. Donut is no more necessary (I cross my fingers!) and I am cycling again. Today a bit more than 20Km under a really pouring rain and plenty of thunder and lightning. BEAUTIFUL!!! The forecast announces same weather the next four days so, if Mr. Donut doesn't show up again, I will continue to enjoy the rain every day as I enjoyed the amazing summer we had. :2t:

Daniel

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Don't be surprised if soon a section of the layout includes an own version of the beautiful work Gilbert Gribi have made with his portable sawmill

http://www.gilbert-gribi.com/GGribi/sciemerlin.html

Daniel

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Daniel Osvaldo Caso wrote: S.E.:

Thank you.
Nice to know you like it.
But... How do you mean 'new home'?...
Daniel

this forum. 
but it sounds like there's much to the story which I am naïve! 
now I am too eager seeing how the wood mill will be incorporated.

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Oh...! Sure, now I understand.
Well, yes, It is a very comnfortable home, indeed.
Regarding the saw mill, an old friend has flooded today my home with amazing  images and photos. Among them some not bad at all ideas for a small portable timber operation:
P2040466 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2040467 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
(Obviously we know each other just -sorry for that- my lonely brain cell can't recognize much names, let's stay initials... :bang: )
Daniel

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  Hi Daniel  :wave:



Now   THAT !   looks pretty useful !!  :pimp:



Where can I get a horse ?  L:



:moose:




Si.


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Hi Si  :wave:
Yes, it looks really usefull and a good way of making a small logging scene posible without needing half of the hobby room for it!
I will see if I can find a French version of it but if not someone at "Ille du Présent" will import one from the UK.
The advantage of the European scene is, even in big France, is a lot smaller than in the US and so also trees, houses, track curves, etc..
Now, here, the combination of the hundreds of images I've got yesterday with the thousands I have been selecting from Delcampe during the last five or six years are creating an explosive situation for the growing dynnamics of the layout. The only way to convey it avoiding too serious frustration but also a too invasive situation of my already 90% modeling invaded home seems to be the a series of theme dioramas option.
The cultivation of oysters in the area of Charente Maritime - Royan is going to be probably the first one.
Other dioramas in the list are
a small saline ...
a horse drawn wagons repair shop ...
a small auto repair shop/pump ...
a small town street diorama with a café, post office, bazar, grocery, hotel and smithy ...
a small timber operation with the portable machines and it's portable steam boiler ... or some other:
P1800427-001 by d.caso, on Flickr
The scene of the dredge with the track running to the river bank on a row of boats as I have been planing for years ...
an extensive beach scene ...
a small steam loco being unloaded from a barge ... 
an old barn with all it's machinery ...
a small quarry scene ...
P1810315 by d.caso, on Flickr
P1780451 by d.caso, on Flickr
Next three photos are pushing me to finaly give the layout a small yard:
P1820388 by d.caso, on Flickr
P1820387 by d.caso, on Flickr
P1820390 by d.caso, on Flickr
Some of the mentioned scenes could become part of the layout and the rest will be fully enjoyed during construction and put on E-Bay for financing the layout development...
Meanwhile other scenes are claiming they have a natural right to become part of the layout:
P1800616 by d.caso, on Flickr
P1800259 by d.caso, on Flickr
P1800146 by d.caso, on Flickr
P1800842 by d.caso, on Flickr
...

Daniel


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...

P1780449 by d.caso, on Flickr

P1780405-002 by d.caso, on Flickr

P1780405-001 by d.caso, on Flickr

P1780379 by d.caso, on Flickr

P1780128 by d.caso, on Flickr

P1770648 by d.caso, on Flickr

...

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...

My version of this one is already underway to the layout:

P1770275 by d.caso, on Flickr

---------

This will be an excellent prototype for the mentioned scene

DSC00347 by d.caso, on Flickr


DSC00466 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC07170 by d.caso, on Flickr



P1760312 by d.caso, on Flickr

...

Last edited on Fri Sep 7th, 2018 08:07 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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This is something different but around my head as annoying flies since many years.
The images are from O&K catalogues so, I assume, probably describing a not unusual system in Germany & surroundings.
We all know it's moder version but this older scene looks much more tempting to me and now, with the perspective of making dioramas it may get a go

DSC02012 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC02013-001 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC02013 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC02013-003 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01821 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC02009 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC02017 by d.caso, on Flickr



DSC02011 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC02010 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC02000 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC02001 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC02018 by d.caso, on Flickr

Last edited on Fri Sep 7th, 2018 07:59 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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DSC01998 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01998-001 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC02004 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01999 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01997 by d.caso, on Flickr

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DSC02007 by d.caso, on Flickr

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DSC01978 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01978-002 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01978-003 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01989 by d.caso, on Flickr

DSC01991 by d.caso, on Flickr

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Larry G
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So many great possibilities, so little space to model even some of them. The tipping mechanism is maybe something I can use.

Larry G

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Well, Larry, I don't know if it works for you but I have found a way to avoid frustration regarding choices: I don't choose!

Let me explain: of course neither do I have enough room for all I would like to do. I just make (mental and cardstock)'boxes', one for each ot those things and keep working on my ongoing project and forget. Suddenly, one day, a piece of material, a specific tool, an idea or even better, a really enthousiastic impulse make me start doing 'something' that would fit in one of those boxed projects. Or even better: the impulse drive me to make something at the moment absolutelly useless. I have learnt to obey such impulses so do what they want me to do and then drop it into one of the boxes and forget again.
One day for a good reason or whithout any I find myself deploying a new project.

That was how my recent diorama was born. It was my first impulse when I decided to start "Île du Présent" but soon I changed my mind and drop it into one of such boxes.
Back from my 'donut' vacation I wasn't able to move freely enough to work on de layout but neither bad enough to do nothing. That diorama gave me a lot of pleasure (is not completed yet) and exploded creating a lot of new boxes.
I have no idea how much of my dioramas list will come to l;ife, but anyway I will enjoy making buildings, trees, vehicles, and all the rest and every now and then bring some scene near (sorry for the stupid word)'completion'.

Sometimes also happens that halfway stuff from one or more boxes jump into other box. Great! The unexpected is a marvelous, often genial compagnon.

But one thing is certain: I may discard some of such projects simply because underway I've lost interest but I won't frustrate any of them by decision.

Plans are good only when they are good provocations that provide the spark to ghet us underway, just as a walker's compass. Knowing where is the North is essential underway but obeying the compass' needle would be idiot. :old dude:

Daniel

Last edited on Fri Sep 7th, 2018 08:08 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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If I were working in a very small space I would build micro layouts with limited operation potential. With the space I have I prefer to fill it with one cohesive layout. Within that space I tend to build individual scenes. Between scenes I build transition scenes such as the "needles". To keep the layout from becoming disjointed I need to carefully choose each element.

Tipper cars have gotten too expensive for me to buy so I will need to scratch build open 4 wheel hopper cars. To empty them the tipping mechanism shown in your last posting could be the answer.

Larry G

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Thank you, Larry, for your explanation.
A bit as starting by the second step so you can always define afterwards where was the previous step.
I see you have found a way that keeps both ends open for creativity when you model a scene. Very clever.

I understand your point about unloading wagons but I don't get why, if they will be tilted for unloading, what is the function of the hopper?

I would make a much simpler unloading device (am not sure but my dysfunctional lonely brain cell is telling me I may have posted a couple of images to your thread some time ago) and small 'gondolas' or whatever you call those wagons...

Daniel

Last edited on Sat Sep 8th, 2018 07:55 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Found it: 442nd. Post in this page of your thread

http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=7226&forum_id=17&page=45

Daniel

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Tonight one of those boxes I was talking about -had been silent for years- suddenly started to talk and and show me a lot of old tree bark. After a while pushed me to the spray booth, then brought me to what must be my workbench (the chaos on and around is simply incredible) and put a couple of colours of pouder acryl paint before my nose and a short hired brush on my hand...
Today I must see if I manage to order a bit the place so can receive the visit of my friend John Vogelaar tomorrow but I will be back to the brak soon:

P2040483 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2040480 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2040485 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

... L: ... Hmm ... something in the horizon is telling me this method (uncountable times older than I am and traditionally used for decorating the Christmas manger) may become the reason why the last two sections of "Île du Présent" may be chopped soon and get a radical new start ... L: ...


Magoo

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Daniel, For an end dump this would be a much simpler contraption. For a side dump the wood contraption with the cane car on it would be a contender. I would most likely build it from "steel" shapes. 
The hopper cars I am thinking of would be a simple flat bottom steel box with 4 wheels. No fooling around, just basic, get the job done, type of thing. Tramways I have visited, did things very simple with little excess of anything. 
Another feature I am hoping to include on my layout is a small transfer table. I think they are also known as a traverser. These things are a great space saver if used in place of a turnout. 
 A brick plant, in St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, had two transfer tables, one at each end of their multi-track drying oven. 
Larry G

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Larry

Exactly.
The Fowler small side dump is the one I was refering to. It looks a lot easier project than the long German one.

It is easy to build and to get it working as long as you ensure the retaining iron lever holding the wagon fast to the tilting track is doing it's work properly.

JOHN FOWLER 138 by d.caso, on Flickr


To make a rake or two of square wooden mining wagons is easy.
I 3D printed the 'metal' parts for the ones I've made for "PONDÉZAR" but Mr. Wallet say I would made them with homasote or other good thin cardstock that permits to emboss rivet details.
If you can make a drawing it wouldn't be expensive to let the 'metal' components be made by one of those modern paper cutters or eventually laser cutting, Magoo is saying whil Mr. Wallet smiles sardonically and, with his always empty pipe still in his mouth, say I rather would (= will) cut them by hand. :bang:

Daniel

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John is not coming tomorrow so the cleaning operation was canceled and I was able to get back to experimenting (= playing) with making greenery

P2040525 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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P2040528 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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Magoo and I

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Al the titles at the top of the page are really worthbut the eight one from the left is solid gold


http://ruedeslumieres.morkitu.org/apprendre/transport_pierre/index.html

Mr. Wallet

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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I have just discovered Freerails' DIORAMAS section .
Have seen half a dozen threads.
What a delight!!!
And for sure a mountain of new stuff to learn.

Daniel

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Hi Larry
Found this French thread where, if you scroll down a bit, you can see the construction of a 1/1 scale, very basic 'feldbahn' transfer table
http://forum.e-train.fr/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=81203
Daniel

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Great 'how to' film

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B--GfgeemwQ


... but... WARNING!!!: turn out the sound if you don't want a honeycomb between your ears.

Daniel

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Daniel, thank you, the French transfer table looks very doable. I have, on hand, all that I will need to build one for my layout. At the moment, I don't have battery power locos so will need to wire the table.
Larry G

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My pleasure, Larry.

I won't give advice about wiring. (Doug and others who know me know my lonely brain cell gets panicked at seeing more than one wire.)

That's why I am working towards RC (... but stuck stuck for years into NC*.)

_______________________________________________________
NC= No Control :us:

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Started to build a transfer table even though I am far from ready for it. I don't have the bench work built in the location where the transfer table will go. 
Sometimes I put the cart before the horse. Larry G

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This may be also an option.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CzBNm1Smz-o
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dPgVsze65HU

Back to the horizontal version, here the three parts of a film about building one


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZ3-W8H356Q

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Fd9Ri3Oaxw

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjUswQIIt2A

Daniel

Last edited on Wed Sep 12th, 2018 06:13 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

Larry G
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Daniel, Clever, but far too complicated for anything I want to do. I like to keep things simple. A manually operated threaded rod drive is what I plan to make for my transfer table.
Larry G

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:thumb:

That's also what I would do. :2t:

Daniel

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P2040757 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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P2040764 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2040766 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2040769 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2040770 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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More later.

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https://www.google.nl/search?q=somua+vehicules+industriels+images&tbm=isch&tbs=rimg:Ceuy15zpEXxeIjjNymUUxcbib_1tFhgIx5Ng7jWo5cjzt2DRP2mfpymWp8Pj9TMxATii-u8RoyVv7cpG25DSc-mH1cyoSCc3KZRTFxuJvEVC26uyYV7dXKhIJ-0WGAjHk2DsRI11Pr2f5ZcQqEgmNajlyPO3YNBGccCC9GtwN7ioSCU_1aZ-nKZanwETC5APa8kRJ-KhIJ-P1MzEBOKL4R60Bj2N0UzGQqEgm7xGjJW_1tykREWW5mr3_1DXeSoSCbbkNJz6YfVzEb4McNf5ywqj&tbo=u&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiO05yTvLfdAhWObVAKHZdRANAQ9C96BAgBEBg&biw=1536&bih=730&dpr=1.25

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Daniel,
Every time I go through your photos I am mesmerized.
I have never been a big train nut.
I am more interested in scenery and buildings.
I am very impressed by yours.
Thanks for sharing.
Darryl Huffman

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Thank you, Darryl, for your very kind words.

(Would be great if you keep thinking the same once you have found your glasses...! ??? )

It tastes good to the soul to know you enjoy my work.

My interest in trains (model or real) is merely aesthetic too.
I prefer, by far, to pay attention to the atmosphere (real and model) and play being part of the one I manage to compose than to focus on electronics and such things.

There is a huge difference between building something with mind and hands and building something with hands and the unknown.

Daniel


------------------

Pst! :In case you want to get drunk, here a link of my work three layouts ago
https://www.flickr.com/photos/daniel_1_32_scale/albums/72157679638692300
And if you want an overdose here all the albums
https://www.flickr.com/photos/daniel_1_32_scale/albums
But both the above are part of my old Flickr where I have no more access. That is why I have a new one for all my current work:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/158027525@N08/page12

Last edited on Tue Sep 18th, 2018 01:34 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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This is chapter one of two.

Not having a garden, I have made through the years a kind of 1/1scale diorama in my kitchen. Every now and then itprovides good ideas and often also materials.


P2050534 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050532 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050531 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050546 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050536 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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P2050538 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050544 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050542 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050545 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Now Autumn and Clock must do their share processing the material and, once the leaves are really dried, it will be very easy to separate the fibers which -the plant explained me last year- remain incredibly strong.
The knots will ensure the fibers will remain together forming a nice piece of tal grass or may be the armature for some plants.
Anyway I will touch every knot with a bit of PVA glue so, if wanted, I can later even cut half the knot.

Chapter two will be posted once Autumn & Clock have done their job.


(Yes, I know one can do something similar with sisal or any other piueceof cord or rope. I have done that plenty of times. But now I want to see how this works.)

Daniel

Last edited on Wed Sep 19th, 2018 08:01 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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Have been doing a lot of nothing the whole day but when the sun was going down I saw this and thought may be you like to see it:

P2050601 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050605 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050616 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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Daniel

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Very effective Daniel. It creates a very "moody" feel to the scene and makes one wonder what's going to appear around the corner.

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Thank you, Doug.
Yes, it gets something mysterious thanks the touch of the sunlight.
One of the advantages of having a poor memory as I do is things appear, reveal their treasures and vanish so next time, when they reappear, one rediscover their magic with genuine astonishment. (Something as getting drunk twice with the same glass of wine.)
I say that because seeing the photos I recall my surprise and how I enjoyed discovering sunlight on "PONDÉZAR"...

Daniel

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Daniel, more inspiration, thank you. Whenever I look at photos of your French island I become excited to build my mountain lodge. I am hoping to mimic the condensed, intimate feeling of your village with mountain resort style buildings. A lot of interest in a small space.
Larry G

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Thank you, Larry.
(You would be very surpised if you knew how much of my work is just good luck or even accidental!)

The 'condensed, intimate feeling' you mention stands with one foot on presenting to the eyes much more than they can see at a glance and the other foot on filling the space with obstacles so as much as possible can be perceived by the eyes only slightly so the desire arises to move a bit for looking each thing from more than one spot.

For example: the partially visible figure in these photos really triggers the desire of the vieuwer's mind to see more:

P2050676 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050681 by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2050678 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


Daniel

Last edited on Fri Sep 21st, 2018 02:45 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

Larry G
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Exactly, I try to do the same thing with scenery elements. Build in layers so not every square inch of a scene is available to the eye from one spot. Mini scenes, taking only a very limited space is also a way to slow a viewer down a bit making a layout seem larger than it actually might be.

Larry G

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Yes. There is a very practical refference for working that way: it is all about using opposites to create different types of contrasts. Actually all arts rely on that: the contrasts between the pairs of opposites: mass/space, big/small, light/dark, warm/cold, hard/soft, geometric/organic, and so on.. Once one gets aware of that, it's easy to go further. L:... I am not sure but may be it's a bit as with the 'Golden Measure': it doesn't matter if we are aware of it or not, it is still always present. After all, perceiving differences of intensity in every area is the way our senses gather information... :old dude: 

Magoo

Last edited on Fri Sep 21st, 2018 07:38 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

Larry G
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I am not familiar with the term, 'Golden Measure'. ?

LG

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The 'magic' aesthetic rectangle.  :old dude:




The 'Golden Ratio'  ...  1 : 1.618  :brill:




:moose:




Si.




Last edited on Sat Sep 22nd, 2018 02:39 pm by Si.

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Exactly, Si.

https://www.goldennumber.net/do-it-yourself/


Daniel

Last edited on Sat Sep 22nd, 2018 07:34 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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http://goldenmeancalipers.com/2018/09/golden-ratio-poster/

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No wonder I never heard of the Golden anything. I do most of my measuring by eye and guess work. I learned my skill set working for the Eyeball Construction Co. The company Motto: CLOSE IS GOOD ENOUGH.:bg:

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" CLOSE IS GOOD ENOUGH "



I guess the guys at N.A.S.A. were thinking that, when their space-probe missed Mars.  :f:



( I think they said it was an Imperial to Metric conversion problem ... Yeah RIGHT ! )  ;)



:moose:




Si.



Try a few 'Golden Ratios' scattered around here & there ... They WORK !  :P


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Of course 'close is good enough.'
Even more: who needs to be 'good enough' or even 'good' if anyway reality is fooling the mind all the time?

My intention when mentioned the golden ratio was not to suggest things 'should' be done this or another way. Far from that.
Here, at 'Île Du Présent', 'must' and 'should' get systematically banned. This island is a hobby, not a profesion so whatever we do gets automatically approval and the right to be.
What I was trying to point is the play with pairs of opposites I was talking about may be something that, as the golden ratio, spontaneously happens without intervention of our will.

But then: why did I mention it?
Because becoming aware of how things work gives us a kind of a compass for orientation which doesn't mean we should always walk to the north.

Daniel


(B.t.w.: here, at the island, we consider the golden ratio approx. 5 to 8 but last time someone thought about that was before the island emerged.)

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" ... reality is fooling the mind all the time "  L:



My feelings ... EXACTLY.  ;)



As they say on 'The X-Files'  :shades:  ... STAY PARANOID & TRUST NO ONE !  :w:



:moose:




Si.


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... L: ... But then...: Why do you trust the X-files...! :bang:

:bg:

This message wasn't posted by me.

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No serious work done. Just playing with materials and the now repaired spray booth.

P2050820 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050826 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Now I have learnt more about making trees but still like te most the old ones made using natural foliage. So the above will go with the pines to a shelf or box very soon.

P2050828 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050830 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050834 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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Daniel

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johnlostcreek
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Very nice work Daniel. You have green fingers. ;)

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Thank you, John.
I am learning.
But... fingers  ?
From my shoes to the ceiling everithing is green here after  a day playing with the greenkeeper and the just resurrected spray booth ...!!! :doh:




;)

Daniel

Last edited on Sun Sep 23rd, 2018 08:27 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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I've spent a dozen of hours making a 3D sketch (in scale) for a possible side project.

No idea if it will be or not but I managed to shake my head until several flies that were bothering me since years felt through my fingers into the computer.


The concept is based on my previous layout "Rochefort" but the three track turntable has been replaced by a second sector plate and a three track traverser has been also added.

I have made enough photos to explain every aspect but, please, keep in mind it is no more than a first sketch and , if it gets build, plenty if not everything will change underway.

The only radical change respect my previous builds is this one is thought as a posible show layout.

It is 1920mm long by 700mm wide and in the drawing it is 540mm tall but at the end it may be a bit taller.

As my last built layouts it is thought for a baseboard at 1,30m height. That way the top of the derelict viaduct will be above eye level for most people and that will help to get the best of the monumental structure.

P2050867 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050868 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050869 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2050870 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2050871 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2050874 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2050873 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
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P2050876 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2050877 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2050878 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
More in a moment.

Last edited on Mon Sep 24th, 2018 09:01 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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P2050884 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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I don't know if the layout will be ever done but this scene is already a MUST for me

P2050892 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050893 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050894 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

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Last photos in a moment.

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P2050901 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050902 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050903 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050904 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050906 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050909 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050910 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050911 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050912 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050908 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

That was it.

Daniel

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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The idea of a closed box with openings for the viewer only at specific spots has been done plenty of times. The great Marcel Ackle have done the most beautiful version I've seen. May be I'll add mine, of course not at the exquisite level of Marcel's. Seeing the photos I thought would be very interesting to make that but every opening being a window of a modelied interior... I mean: the viewer would only be able to see from inside different buildings.
I also remember Malcom Furlow made a beautiful scene of a rainy day seen from the inside of a bar... Hmm... L: ...


Magoo

Last edited on Mon Sep 24th, 2018 08:13 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

Larry G
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The concept for your display layout is brilliant, looking forward to the build. I love the idea of looking at a scene out the window from inside a room. I just might steal that idea from you.

Larry G

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fascinating concept Daniel and it has much of the DNA of your earlier models, especially the "climbing" buildings.
I'm looking forward to seeing how this develops.

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Thank you, Larry.
Great to have triggered a bit of your interest.The idea of sharing the drawings/photos has simply that intention and, of course, see if other's comments bring me to improve the design.Actually I don't believe ideas are product of the individual as fishes are not product of the fisherman.So feel free to pick up whatever you like but don't forget I would love to see photos of what you make of it. :old dude:

Daniel

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Thank you. Doug.
Yes, as said, it has roots in "ROCHEFORT" and  will, probably, include the couple of buildings that have been patiently waiting to be recycled since survived the chopping of both,"ROCHEFORT" and "PONDÉZAR". 
One thing is certain: I don't know yet if as part of this layout or as a diorama but at least the central building with the patio and the one at the right with the small terraces IS GOING TO BE:
P2050894 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr
P2050908 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Something I kept in mind while designing is the whole layout -including it's wooden case on wheels- must not  take more than a  60cm X 75cm X 198cm tall (a bit less than 2' X 2'6" X 6' 8") standing on one of it's ends, as a column when not in use.That ensures it will be easy to run it through every average door and will take  little room when not in use. That will make not too complicated to bring it to shows and, if life want's to make me the pleasure, help to sell it for financing some other project that will come up underway. :us:
Daniel

Last edited on Mon Sep 24th, 2018 09:04 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

Larry G
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The split stairway is so cool, need one on my layout. My balance is not so trustworthy these days, so the stairway with no hand railing, makes me very uneasy.
old Larry G  :old dude:

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Larry

You...impatient child ... !!!

It is just a sketch an plenty is not shown or even not yet decided.
Anyway the local gov. has taken notice of your claim:

P2050945 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050946 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2050947 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr


:bg:


Magoo

Last edited on Mon Sep 24th, 2018 04:32 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

Larry G
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Thank you Daniel, for such prompt action. I feel much safer now, climbing those stairs to my flat. 
Larry G

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Enjoy !!!

:thumb:


Daniel

Allen Gardner
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Hello Daniel, it is I happy to be back on the île Du Présent....is my room free? :glad:

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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WOW...!!!

:glad::glad::2t:

Who pushed you to take the leap?

WELCOME DEAR FRIEND!!!

It makes me very happy to see you here.
Sorry about your room: Mr. W. saw an oportunity and is offering it as B&B. But only for the weekends.(No, B&B doesn't mean Bad Brexiters.)Anyway you get one of the now empty floors of the monastery.

Daniel, Magoo, Zorro and Mr. W.


NO...! Not Zorro...!!!
Why not?
We are not allowed to get into politics, beekeeping or smoking spinach here.
O.k., remove Zorro. :us:

Last edited on Mon Sep 24th, 2018 09:32 pm by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

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A stairway without handrails?



Taken this year in France. In an old castle / ruine. And yes it is that steep and that long. In the middle you see a small flat part, after that the next stairway starts.

I had to go down as part of the tour.


Alwin

Last edited on Mon Sep 24th, 2018 09:22 pm by Alwin

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Impressive.
77 steps?

Daniel

Larry G
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No danger of falling off the sides of this stairway. Falling down the steep stairway is another matter.   
LG

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L: ... Well, in that case:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5yUiXWbiy4 :glad:

:bg:



Daniel

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Today's two minutes rush brought me to play a bit with colors on pieces of bark (picked up for making a series of stone roofs for a French village near the Italian border using another method that I will describe here soon) and play on them with a bit of colors.

P2060078 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060079 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060081 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060082 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060083 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060084 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060085 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060086 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060087 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060088 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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... then added a bit of green stuff

P2060089 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060090 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr



P2060091 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060093 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060094 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060095 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Last edited on Wed Sep 26th, 2018 11:50 am by Daniel Osvaldo Caso

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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P2060096 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060097 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060098 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060099 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060101 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060102 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060103 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060105 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060108 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060109 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060110 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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P2060113 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060114 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060115 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060116 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060117 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060119 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060120 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060122 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

Of course, not having any specific scene or evene theme during the experiment the color work is missing every definition. I was constantly between my usual landscapes and the opposite, those British slate walls I have never seen in real life. So the result depict none of both but gives an idea of what I enjoyed today.

Daniel

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A now more continental European type

(The pieces were painted but two of them felt from my hands while bringing them all to this room and that caused some damage exposing in some places a bit of the anyway beautiful cinnamon color that doesn't fit the scene)

P2060267 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060272 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060272 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060275 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060278 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060282 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060287 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060290 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060291 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060292 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060293 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060295 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060297 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060298 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060300 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

It is a very sunny day, almost 18C in my area -which after the long, hot summer seems cold now- and I go now cycling.
With some luck once back I will be able to do some real modeling instead of playing with landscaping.

Daniel

W C Greene
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Daniel, the tree bark looks pretty damn good! With stuff like that "laying around", who needs latex molds, plaster, paint,and all the mess?! I used to have access to old bark like that but when I moved, the new neighbors like to get rid of all such stuff.
Carry on
Woodie

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Hi Woodie.

Yes, the bark is amazing beautiful.
Looking with attention one can't avoid admiring Nature playing with both, stratiefied rocks and bark forming, the same primal hymn.

Here I only need to jump on my bicycle and in an hour am back with a full bag of it.

There are many other ways to use it for modeling purposes.
For example for making stone roofs as I did for one of the buildings of "PONDÉZAR".
I will see if I can find the photos I posted by then but anyway I will give that a second try soon.


Daniel

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I like the bark experiments very much Daniel,  especially those in post 446 & 447. The way the surface is cracked and lifting some pieces look as if they were slightly burnt beforehand. Is the colour work all pastels or did you spray them first? I’ve seen bark used as cliff faces before but never treated like that, it’s always looked like...bark 

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Thank you, Allen.

Yes, the bark was first sprayed with matt black and here and there with bits of rests of gray and light ocker I still had in a couple of spray cans. Then I worked a little with pastels and yesterday and today I used a bit of powder pastel colors.

But would be a lot better to make the work pointing to a specific theme and scene. In my case, the French scene requieres a lot of variations in a range of light ockers, white, grays and a little black.
But I really want to stop for a while this 'ethereal landscaping' activities and get back to building real stuff.

May be I will give a start to the build of horse drawn wagons, cars and boats...

Traditionally plenty of cork bark has been used in continental Europe for simulating other than stratified types of rocks. But, as a material, it seems to have been hijacked by the Marklin-Fleischmann-Trix world. Nevertheless, a great, friendly and beautiful material to work with.

Daniel

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Last of the useless landscaping before cleaning the whole workplace for real work.
As said before, I never saw a slate rock formation in real life but from photos I realize the right shades of grays would look a lot better.
But I am too lazy to look for such photos now so I used the same materials for an intent of slate. My British friends will laugh but they are allowed to do so.

P2060435 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060436 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060437 (3) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060438 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060439 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060440 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060442 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060443 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060444 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

P2060445 (2) by Daniel Osvaldo Caso, on Flickr

It was not my intention but if one look for the best bark pieces for making a slate formation will certainly find much better.

Now back to real business.

Daniel

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Well it may not stand an in depth comparison to the ‘real thing’ Daniel but, some how it feels/looks right, it has an inherent organic sense that manipulates you into accepting it as the ‘real thing’. In the right setting and dressed the right way these test prices wouldn’t be questioned unless the viewer was prompted the think about it....and we know how dangerous that is ;)
(And thank you for the description of technique)

Last edited on Thu Sep 27th, 2018 10:50 am by Allen Gardner

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Daniel

That shale work is very similar to shale out crops I come across in Western Canada, a tan color and you would have a rock formation similar to sandstone. On a previous layout I have used cedar bark for both type's of rock. With a good sized slab of bark, I've used it for vertical cliffs also.

Have a few 2-4" thick slabs of shale and sandstone I've hauled into my back yard, from which I have made rubber molds for rock casting's.

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Thank you, Allen, for the good feedback.
As said, I was just playing with the materials seeing what was coming up, not trying to render a specific formation.I know that reproducing something one never has seen or had real interest/focus on is not exactly a garranty for success.And I also know you, British, have a fanatic passion for slate as the Dutch have for frites, so I won't argue against any of both.
It is great to see you participating here, dear friend!
Daniel

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Thank you, Ken.
I would like to see images of those Canadian stones but even more I would like to see images of your work. Would you, please, post photos or a link here where I can see it?
Daniel

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Well... a British botfly walks around trying to bite me:

https://www.google.nl/search?q=slate+rock+formations+images&tbm=isch&tbs=rimg:CX0-bAzDoVCgIjheYOOwDOEjvZDTXioJ_1yjbmMvZ6pInKLyZffWTIOfBHv30rwjuJWbRvCl5TS91osJ24MXyrAYkgioSCV5g47AM4SO9EVl2-A8tR5h9KhIJkNNeKgn_1KNsRrrOCivaFFTwqEgmYy9nqkicovBF1nxmW89UibioSCZl99ZMg58EeEYGB8mRCLJiVKhIJ_1fSvCO4lZtER19GyBQc_1T5cqEgm8KXlNL3WiwhGus4KK9oUVPCoSCXbgxfKsBiSCEZY5IIYbNdDR&tbo=u&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi8r7aLvdvdAhVLJlAKHcunCYQQ9C96BAgBEBg&biw=1536&bih=724&dpr=1.25

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The way the layers change direction is quite extraordinary, very exciting.

Larry G
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I like the idea of using tree bark. Not sure if we have any trees with good bark materiel around here. Mostly evergreen trees. I'll need to check this out very soon, snow predicted tonight.

Larry G