Freerails Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Logging & Mining > 'Henderson Bay Timber Co.' - 1:87 Diesel Logging

Freerails IS ACCEPTING new Members ... To join Freerails ... See how to Register as a Member in the 'Joining Freerails' Forum

'Henderson Bay Timber Co.' - 1:87 Diesel Logging
 Moderated by: . Page:  First Page Previous Page  ...  10  11  12  13  14  15   
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Tue Sep 17th, 2019 04:17 am
  PMQuoteReply
141st Post
Reg H
Moderator


Joined: Sun Oct 19th, 2014
Location: Shelton, USA
Posts: 840
Status: 
Offline
Have I mentioned that the Builders in Scale engine house,
is really a craftsman kit with some laser cut parts?

I have?  OK.  It's the truth.





These are the roof vents, partially fabricated and assembled. 
Do not consider this kit unless you have significant craftsman kit experience. 
This represents a full afternoon's work.

It is a great kit. 
My finished engine house will be a nice addition to the layout. 
If someone were to devote a bit more time,
like a year of evenings and weekends, to the kit (I have cut some corners),
they could produce a truly stunning model from just the contents of the box,
plus paint, stain and glue. 

The BTS mill challenged my patience with 1,600 laser cut parts. 
But all the parts were laser cut.
This engine house is challenging my skill,
where most of the parts have to be fabricated. 

Of course, some of my slow progress can be attributed to age. 
My eye sight is not what it used to be, nor are my manual dexterity and steadiness. 
It just means that I have to  jig more things up, and use my magnifier.  


Reg




____________________
Reg
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Nov 1st, 2019 06:04 pm
  PMQuoteReply
142nd Post
Reg H
Moderator


Joined: Sun Oct 19th, 2014
Location: Shelton, USA
Posts: 840
Status: 
Offline
Returning from the HO/OO page...

I have abandoned the laser kit engine house.  It is just too small. 
The parts have been carefully stored away for future use. 
I may convert it into something else, like a car repair shed, sometime in the future.

In it's place I have opted for the Cornerstone brick two-stall engine house. 
I simply did not want to go after an expensive and complex kit again. 
I am very anxious to get this logging operation completed. 

So far I have given the brick work a wash with my ink/alcohol mix,
painted the window frames white in accordance with HBTCo practice,
and painted all the parts cast in gray plastic grimy black,
after some airbrush adventures detailed elsewhere. 
Oh.  I also painted the doors tuscan red.

The ink/alcohol wash is very subtle, but the diluted ink gathers in the mortar lines,
creating a shadow effect that helps accentuate the brick work. 
The brick work will get a shot of Dull Coat to kill whatever shine is left. 

I am rethinking the window frames.  I may repaint them tuscan red. 
The white just seems to scream "look at me!!".  
Not exactly the effect for which I am looking.  

I want it to obviously be there,
but I don't want it to detract from the logging operation center of attention, the mill. 

Reg




____________________
Reg
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Nov 7th, 2019 05:26 pm
  PMQuoteReply
143rd Post
Reg H
Moderator


Joined: Sun Oct 19th, 2014
Location: Shelton, USA
Posts: 840
Status: 
Offline
Here is the Cornerstone engine house essentially complete. 
I need to touch up the paint and cut a base.

A little paint did wonders for the basic kit. 
The green trim looked positively revolting,
and the gray in which the roof was cast just did not look right. 

Once I got my airbrush techniques for the acrylic paint in order,
I was really pleased with the results. 
The paint goes on very evenly and lays down nicely.

While this structure doesn't have quite the character a more complex kit might have,
I am confident it will work well on the layout. 
The roof (slate is more an "east of the Mississippi" practice.  But who will notice?) is removable.  
Once it has been on the layout for awhile and collected some dust (I live in a mill town),
I will give it a shot of DullCoat.  Lazy man's weathering.  

I may do some more weathering, but it will be very light.  

From various sources I have acquired an impressive collection,
of barrels, crates, and other oddments & impedimentia.  
It will be fun spreading all this around the logging operation. 
What is a logging operation without industrial detritus.

Reg







____________________
Reg
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Nov 11th, 2019 07:11 pm
  PMQuoteReply
144th Post
Alan Sewell
Registered
 

Joined: Sun Nov 19th, 2017
Location: Hertford, United Kingdom
Posts: 174
Status: 
Offline
Reg

Engine house looks pretty good,
and to me the roof looks more like metal sheeting than slate
(I would notice that !!).

This side of the pond, slates are normally no bigger than 24”x 14”,
and very often much smaller.

The roofing looks much bigger than that,
but perhaps in Mississippi slates are bigger.

As for the brick, which you know I am not sure of in the PNW (Simpson excluded),
well I would justify it as the mill producing wood “brick-pattern” novelty siding.

I am sure that existed and the engine house is an advert for the company product.

I have a “Sears  catalogue house” as the mill office on my layout,
which serves the same purpose.
It is in the background of the attached photo, slightly out of focus, sorry.

Looking forward to seeing the mill site develop.

Best regards

Alan   





Back To Top

 Posted: Tue Nov 12th, 2019 05:07 pm
  PMQuoteReply
145th Post
Reg H
Moderator


Joined: Sun Oct 19th, 2014
Location: Shelton, USA
Posts: 840
Status: 
Offline
The idea of a house as a mill office is a good one. 
I may steal that idea.

The dispatch office for the railroad operation does not need to be so large. 
The office for Simpson (now used by PS&P) is pretty minimal.

I will have some photos of progress a bit later in the day. 
All the cork is down and smoothed off.  A couple of things were a challenge. 
Trackage was not envisioned in the location of the engine house. 
So some of the sub-roadbed is a bit rough.
I had to do some shimming and Shurform work on the roadbed. 
The log dump is designed for either a deeper pond or higher terrain than the mill. 
I built up the road bed using the cork, and then filed it down to a consistent slope. 

More progress here depends on the arrival of a shipment from Walthers. 
I wish this stuff was available on Amazon Prime. 
Getting stuff the day after you order it is the next best thing to a local hobby shop. 
I have turnouts and scenery materials coming from Walthers. 
I ordered ground throws directly from Caboose Industries.  

I learned a lesson.  I have always used the same ground throws. 
It's been a challenge with MicroEngineering turnouts, because the throw rods are very narrow,
with a very small hole for the connection to whatever will be operating the turnout. 
In the past I fashioned a wire rod to connect the Caboose Industries ground throw to the turnout. 
It turns out (no pun intended) that Caboose Industries has a set of adapters,
one of which is specifically designed to work with the ME turnouts.  

While awaiting supplies I did a little work on the GP-30. 
I am very close to having the Kato chassis fit the Bachmann shell. 
It looks like one more bit of grinding on the chassis should do it. 
But I am taking my time in between cuts to make sure I understand what is going on. 
It would help if I had X-ray vision. 
It looks like the only remaining challenge is to figure out how to arrange the headlights.
Kato and Bachmann use two very different approaches to mounting the headlights,
and guiding the light to the appropriate location.




____________________
Reg
Back To Top

 Posted: Tue Nov 12th, 2019 05:25 pm
  PMQuoteReply
146th Post
Reg H
Moderator


Joined: Sun Oct 19th, 2014
Location: Shelton, USA
Posts: 840
Status: 
Offline
Here are some views of the main components of the mill site. 

Obviously many details are to follow. 
I will spend years adding fun stuff to this site.

Track laying will commence as soon as the track arrives.

For photo purposes I need to come up with a means of hiding my ugly basement.














Regarding the use of brick to build the engine house,
it actually makes a great deal of sense. 

When built it would have housed steam locomotives,
along with oils and greases, welding gases,  grinders, oily waste, etc. 

In short, a goodly collection of flammable material.  


Reg




____________________
Reg
Back To Top

 Posted: Tue Nov 12th, 2019 10:21 pm
  PMQuoteReply
147th Post
Kitbash0n30
Registered


Joined: Mon Dec 10th, 2012
Location: Boonville, Missouri USA
Posts: 719
Status: 
Offline
That engine house you are using now,
could be thought of as tying your layout in the here and now to model railroad history,
as it sure reminds me of one offered by the plastic model company Revell before I was born;
think it originated in the 1950s.

Have seen it in 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, model train magazines.




____________________
See y'all later, Forrest.
Screw the rivets, I'm building for atmosphere
Back To Top

 Posted: Tue Nov 12th, 2019 11:30 pm
  PMQuoteReply
148th Post
Reg H
Moderator


Joined: Sun Oct 19th, 2014
Location: Shelton, USA
Posts: 840
Status: 
Offline
Yes, indeed. 

If Walthers didn't outright purchase the molds for the old Revell engine house,
they sure were working from the same set of plans, or nearly so.

The Revell model has some differences.  

Reg




____________________
Reg
Back To Top


 Current time is 08:57 pm
Page:  First Page Previous Page  ...  10  11  12  13  14  15   

Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Logging & Mining > 'Henderson Bay Timber Co.' - 1:87 Diesel Logging
Top



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems