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'Henderson Bay Timber Co.' - 1:87 Diesel Logging
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 Posted: Tue Jan 22nd, 2019 10:24 pm
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Alan Sewell
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Reg

Simpson did some aerial views of the mill at Shelton in the 1940's I think.
This is an enlargement of the "McCleary" mill next to the log dump (site of the old mill 3)
and clearly shoe the green lumber chain to the right of the mill next to the log dump tracks.

Hope this helps and not just adds to the confusion .

Alan





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 Posted: Tue Jan 22nd, 2019 10:49 pm
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Reg H
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Alan

This is good stuff. 
If you go to BTS web site they have a suggested layout both of the interior of the mill and the entire mill complex.

It is different than what you have provided.  Maybe east coast practice was different. 

Reg




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 Posted: Tue Jan 22nd, 2019 10:59 pm
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Reg H
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Alan:

I skipped over and looked at the BTS site. 
Working from limited knowledge of lumber mills, it looks like the Slatyfork mill is what we might call a stud mill.

There is no provision for heavy timbers. 
The process starts with a band saw (actually two. The mill is a "two-saw" mill), then a transfer table to an edger, and then to a swing saw.  

After the swing saw(s) there is a transfer table out to the loading dock, which is the dock off the larger of the side doors.  

Reg




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 Posted: Tue Jan 22nd, 2019 11:15 pm
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Alan Sewell
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Hi Reg

I had a look at the BTS site as well,
and although there are some East Coast variations I think they have just made a lot of compromises,
or have been influenced by other modelers mills rather than going back to the prototype.

I am sure a two bandsaw mill would produce heavy timbers,
and there is no provision for grading boards just a transfer for unsorted lumber.

The tramway and drying yard looks way too small, as is the dry kiln.
Normally these are in banks and can cover an area nearly as big as the mill. Same for a planing mill.

I think the biggest problem is the lack of green chain,
and as often is the case with model mills, loading lumber straight on to railcars from a door in the mill.

Having said all this the main mill is a good basis for a model. 
Whether using anymore of the BTS models as they are is a good idea,
really depends on your thoughts about the accuracy of the product,
and how comfortable you are with this.

Sorry for the rambling it is getting late this side of the pond

Alan


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 Posted: Wed Jan 23rd, 2019 03:31 pm
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Reg H
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Alan:

I had to stop and get some real work done.

I think there may be a matter of scale here, too. 
I have a mill interior kit in 1/4" scale that is modeled from a small mill in northern California. 
Apart from being a circular saw mill, the layout, taken from the turn of century prototype, is almost identical to the interior layout of the BTS kit. 
Saw/edger/swing saw and out the door.  

I would think, from a vast ignorance, that a very small mill might grade the lumber in the yard. 

It has not been my intention of loading outbound cars at the loading dock. 
With no drying provision, I would think, again, working from my ignorance, that a very small mill would dry, to the extent possible, in the yard. 
Which would mean outbound loading would take place from the yard.  

Though the BTS kit is a pretty large structure for a small model railroad, as mills go, it is rather small. 

Another factor is that I am out to capture the essence, rather than getting down to rivet counting. 
That was always a contrast between my approach to rail fanning and John's. 
In fact, John did not consider himself a rail fan.  He styled himself an industrial archeologist. 
On our trips together, while John worked to collect all the details he could, I would stand back and try and capture the feel of the scene.  

That carries over into my modeling.

Reg




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 Posted: Fri Jan 25th, 2019 05:02 pm
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Alan Sewell
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Hi Reg 
Yes my modeling is also trying to get the right atmosphere rather than complete accuracy. Although I do like to feel I am basing things on reality.
I agree that dried lumber is likely to be loaded in the drying yard  and not straight out of the mill. However often it seems there is a loading took to which the lumber is taken and then loaded to railcars,
The attached shows this 
Alan  

Attachment: millyard.jpg (Downloaded 31 times)

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 Posted: Fri Jan 25th, 2019 05:08 pm
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Alan Sewell
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Going back again to the BTS mill I do think the missing part is the green chain. The transfer at the rear of the mill could easily feed one and nearly all rail served mills I have seen have this feature. From the green chain the graded lumber would go the the drying yard/dry kilns or maybe further processing.
The attached is from the Brown Lumber text book and shows a generic lay out.
I will post a couple of scans  next of the McNary mill in Arizona on the Apache Railway. 
Alan 

Attachment: mill 3.jpg (Downloaded 30 times)

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 Posted: Fri Jan 25th, 2019 05:10 pm
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Alan Sewell
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Plan of McNary mill from Sanborn map. Green chain is marked 
Alan 

Attachment: mcnaryplanfr.jpg (Downloaded 29 times)

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 Posted: Fri Jan 25th, 2019 05:11 pm
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Alan Sewell
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Aerial view of McNary mill
Alan 

Attachment: mcnarymillc.jpg (Downloaded 27 times)

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 Posted: Fri Jan 25th, 2019 05:15 pm
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Alan Sewell
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Finally - hurrah you say !!!!!
This is the preserved McLean mill on Vancouver Island . The green chain is in the foreground
Enough for tonight?
Alan 


Attachment: Picture1.jpg (Downloaded 27 times)

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