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Reg H
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I decided to quit high jacking Alan's diesel logging thread and start one for the logging branch on my layout.

In keeping with the general theme, the logging operation has been named the 'Henderson Bay Timber Co.".  
Keeping the theme pure would have resulted in the "Henderson Timber Co.", but adding the "Bay" seems to help it roll off the tongue.   
Those who know my history and the history of this layout will understand. 

For those not following the HO/OO thread, I am building an HO layout roughly patterned after the Northern Pacific Raymond Branch.  
But the name of my fictional branch is the Henderson Bay Branch and tends much more strongly to Great Northern.   
You can follow progress on the Class 1 part of the layout in the HO/OO thread.  
I am moving discussions of the logging operation here. 

Not much to report on the mill yet.  The foundation is approaching completion, but not without some adventures.   
It is always a mistake to get in a hurry, and there never should be a reason that parts are not test fit before final assembly.

I got in a hurry and made some pretty monumental mistakes.  
The result is that I have been doing repairs to some broken parts and fabricating one duplicate part.  

On the brighter side:






An online retailer, Train World, Inc., had these on sale for $49.95 each.  DCC equipped and painted as you see it.  So I bought two.  

As the Simpson Timber Co. often did, I can picture one on each end of a string of skeleton log cars.

I will be looking for some dry transfers to add numbers.  A little light weathering will bring out the details.  
I haven't programmed them yet, so can't report on running characteristics, but the reviews are good.  
Programming will wait until after they are numbered.

Reg

Alan Sewell
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Hi Reg

Will be interested to follow this thread and is good to see your are progressing. 
The GE 70-ton is a nice nice lokey. 

You might remember Weyerhauser used several on their logging railroad out of Springfield OR. 
John H sent me some B&W photos and I have collected a few more slides since.

I use a GE as one of the lokeys on my imagined  branch. 
It alternates with one or two steam lokeys as the company have not bothered to upgrade the tracks for heavier SW's. 
The woods are about logged other than in that area. 
Like you I have to do some weathering etc.
 
Attached is a photo taken today of it arriving with a log train at the headquarters camp.
I find it runs very sweetly and I have sound added. 
However it does have limited pulling power but handles six cars on a gentle grade. 
You might need to check this for your branch.

Alan 

Attachment: ALC#104.JPG (Downloaded 405 times)

Alan Sewell
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Reg

You might consider running the GE's back to back as in the attached. 
When I first visited Simpson in 1989 they ran their lokeys this way. 
They only changed to running a unit at each end in I think the mid 1990's.


Alan 

Attachment: Spfld GE 70T001.jpg (Downloaded 408 times)

Reg H
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I am thinking of running them back to back but at opposite ends of the train.

I still have a lot to do before that is a critical decision.

Off to the basement to work on the mill. 
Just the foundation is proving to be time consuming. 
Not terribly difficult, just time consuming.

Reg


Reg H
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Making some progress on the mill:





This is the right side wall.  Yes, it is 16" long...in HO.  It is a large building. 

Paint is Badger Tuscan Light Oxide Red, which looks good to me. 
Trying to judge color from an on-line color chart is a bit of a challenge.

I was reluctant to use up any of my Floquil hoard on such a big project.  
I had my reservations about acrylics, having had a very negative experience with Polly S when it first came out.  

This went on great.  It is air-brushed right out of the bottle.  
The only challenge is that my air brush is an upscale Badger "fine".   
It is perfect for fine work, such as weathering, but has a very narrow spread for this kind of work.  
I have a Harbor Freight airbrush which looks to be surprisingly good quality (it was on sale at $9.95), 
but I haven't taken the time to find the right hose fittings for it.  

I keep thinking I am going to spend money on hose and fittings and find out the thing is the piece of junk to which the price attests.  
But we shall see.   It sure looks and feels good.

See all the windows?  There are eight pieces for each window.  It will take awhile.  
The sequence in the instructions has one assembling the wall framing and then applying the sheathing, and then doing the windows.  
I don't think so.  I will be doing all the detail work flat on the bench before assembling the walls.

This is the inside of the wall, showing the framing.  


 


I used a "honey oak" stain for the framing.  I really like the way it turned out.  
I encountered a "weathered gray" stain while shopping for the oak stain.  
I haven't tried it yet, but am interested in seeing how it compares with my india ink/alcohol standard.

I have a photo of the completed (well, almost. I have some painting to do) foundation.
The foundation was a major project as well as a major learning experience. 

I will provide details when that photo finally wends it's way through cyberspace from my phone to my computer.  

Reg

Reg H
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Here is a photo of the almost completed foundation:







This was a major project.  

A big lesson learned is that any of the small cross-section pieces that are cross-grain are VERY fragile.  
There is a lot of repair work in here.  Several pieces broke along the grain with practically no pressure at all.  
That was abetted by my trying to be in a hurry and skipping the trial fit step.  
The result being that I had to attempt forcing pieces together after applying the glue.  Very bad idea.

Another result of being in a hurry was not paying attention to the assembly sequence.
You will note that the second bent in is a bit different shade than the others and has no laser burn.  
That resulted from inserting one too many of the taller bents in place.   
I woke up at 2:00 AM the following morning with the realization of that mistake.
Obviously, our brains chew on the events of the day while we sleep.

So, I fixed that problem by cutting down the misplaced bent to match the short bents and fabricating a replacement.  
Not a bad job of fabrication if I do say so myself.  I had not glued the very end bent in place.  So I used it as a pattern.  
Then some very careful work with the drill, coping saw, band saw and emery board to get it all looking right.  

This fabrication was a further lesson.  In the kit, each bent is composed of two pieces essentially butt-joined together.  
I thought that was silly.  Why not fabricate each bent out of one piece?
Because....basswood comes in standard widths and lengths.  
The only way to fabricate a bent in a single piece is to arrange the beams with the grain and the piles across the grain.  
I learned on the first attempted cut why that is a bad idea.  The very first pile I tried to cut broke along the grain.  
The only way to make the grain run with the pile is to make the bent in two pieces. 

There are cross-braces between every bent.  The idea is to install those between every leg of every bent.  
You can see the outside ones.  I haven't decided whether to install the interior ones or not, as they won't be visible.  
There would be 40 additional cross braces to carefully remove from their sheets, trial fit, and glue in place.  
The bracing, by the way, is detailed down to nail holes.  

The last step on this assembly, unless I decide to spend a couple of days applying the rest of the cross braces,  
is painting the outside of the outside floor beams flat black.  They end up just about 1/8" behind the windows.  

In the background you can see the bottle of Titebond glue.  B.T.S. recommends the Titebond for structural assemblies.  
I love this stuff.   It is widely used in the experimental aircraft community.  
The instructions recommend white glue for non-structural applications because it will dry clear. The Titebond tends to have a yellow tinge.  
My inclination is to use the Titebond throughout and just be careful on how much I slather on.



Reg

Alan Sewell
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Reg

Looking very impressive. Must say the quality of the kit and of your work is really good.
Will the mill be seen from all sides or will you be able to speed things up by only detailing part of the structure

Alan

Reg H
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Alan:

I haven't determined the orientation of the mill on the layout yet.   
I want to get it completed and then try out different locations and orientations.  

I had a brainstorm last night that may allow me to install the entire complex, which would be really cool.  
But until I have enough complete to try out some places and see how I can make the track configuration work, all is still up in the air.

This is one of those structures that I will probably complete all sides even if some won't be visible,
with the possible exception of the cross bracing under the building. 

Reg


Alan Sewell
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Hi Reg

Very brave doing the whole kit even if some won't be seen, 
but then again given the price and the quality of the kit I  guess you an feel justified in completing it as designed. 
Anyway progress so far is impressive.

I had been sorting out materials to start the scenery at my woods camp, 
but during today's running session one of the switches has developed a short which was not happening on Monday. 
The switch has been in situ for about THIRTY years so may be age has won out!!!
Fortunately I have a replacement so will now be doing the track work instead of scenery - 
oh well model railroading is fun isn't it.

Alan 


Reg H
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If it wasn't fun, we wouldn't do it.

Since we are doing it, it must be fun.

:)

I purposely install turnouts so that they are "relatively" easy to replace.  I hope.
 
Since this is the first time in many years (decades) that I have laid commercial track,
I don't know how some things will work out in the long run.

Reg


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Scored today on a brief trip to Harbor Freight.

My Badger airbrush is a fine instrument, with "fine" being the descriptive term.

Above I discussed the HF airbrush I bought on impulse a couple of years ago.  
It was on sale for $9.95 and for some reason I thought it a good idea to buy it.

Only to find out, after getting it home, that it's air hose connection did not match anything I had.  
So the thing kind of went in to cold storage.

With the mill project, and vast expanses of scribed siding to paint, I thought to resurrect it.  
I started pawing through the HF website in hopes that they might have the adapters necessary to make the thing useful.  

No luck on adapters, but while reading some reviews,
it was mentioned the hose came with adapters that match the Badger connection.

So I went and got one.  Best under $10 purchase I have made in a long time.  It is a REALLY nice hose, and 10 feet long.  
In the raw, it connects to the HF airbrush.  But includes the adapter to attach the Badger.  
PLUS, another adapter that mates it up with my little Binks air compressor.  

Success.  It will be awhile before I get to try it out.  
Installing the windows on the right side wall is going to be a lengthy process.  

Reg

Si.
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Hi Reg  :wave:



WOW !  :shocked:

Awesomely FAST ! and GOOD lookin' work on the new mill.  :thumb:



The 'Henderson Bay Timber Co.' branch seems like a WINNER of an idea to me.  :)

I could seriously drop large scale narrow gauge, for HO mooodern diesel logging ...

... but I aint going to, due to reasons of the RUBBERGAUGINGitus it would cause me.  :f:



But HEY ! ... I got you & Alan to watch !  :bg:

Alan swears he's gonna stop playing trains for a few mins. & whack some more scenery in as well.  :slow:

Great to see you two mooodern day loggers showing us vintage narrow gaugers how to do it !  ;)



I totally LUUUVE this proto photo of Alans !





Back-to-back mini mooodern deseisels in glorious Caterpillar ? yellow ... T :cool: :cool:  FREAKIN'  C :cool: :cool: L  !



Your pic. aint too bad either Reg.  :P






N  I  C  E  !



:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:




Si.


Reg H
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Thanks, Si.


Of course, now I have to stage a photo op for you.   :)

I hope to get a couple of windows in the right side wall this evening.  It will depend on the "honey do" list.

Reg


Reg H
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For Si:





:glad:


Reg

Reg H
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Spent some time on the mill, but didn't get as far as I wanted.

My heart!  These parts are small.







These parts are the upper and lower sash for one of the MANY windows.  
I spent about 1/2 hour wiggling the parts from the sheet, sticking them on the clear plastic, and trimming them to size.   
The window opening required a bit of work, too, getting things to fit right.

I had to stop here because I found that I was out of ACC.  I am never out of ACC.  How did that happen?  

Though the instructions don't address it, clearly the best way to install the lower sash
(which installs from the back side of the wall using the bit of clear plastic as a mounting flange) is with ACC.  

Rather than experiment with something else, I decided to move on to other things.

Probably a good idea.  I should test fit everything for the window installation before gluing anything in place.  
In addition to the parts shown, there is the casing (one piece) and the trim, which consists of four pieces. 

I moved on to painting the left side wall.  I used the aforementioned Harbor Freight airbrush.  It works just fine.  
I experimented around with it, and it seems to work as well as my $100 Badger.  

Harbor Freight still has them, but at the "regular" price of $19.95.  
Really, if you are strapped for funds and would find an airbrush useful, I would highly recommend this product.   
I guess I should post a photo and SKU.  Soon.

Reg


Reg H
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Looking at Alan's photos of the GE locos, it appears that just a few small upgrades would really spiff things up.


Black stacks, screens over the radiators, 5-chime horns, and visors.


Yep.  No doubt about it.  I am better at coming up with projects than I am at getting them done!

Reg

Reg H
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As promised:





The SKU is 95810.

Of course, you will need a hose and an air supply.  
Get the hose from HF.  Less than $8.00, and it is nice hose.

In the reviews one of the comments was that HF did not have any additional bottles available.  
Not a problem.  The bottle connection is industry standard.  
You can order bottles, paint cups, etc.  from any airbrush supplier.  

Reg


Si.
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Hi Reg  :wave:



Thanks for the great photo op !  :)  :cool:  :P  :shocked:  :bg:



Railfaning the 'Henderson Bay Timber Co.' looks like pretty good FUN !  :thumb:





I like yours BETTER than Alans 1:1 photo now.  :P

His doesn't have the WASP STRIPES !  :shocked:



Yer gotta have them yer know.  ;)



:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:




Si.


Reg H
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SI

This is fun.  But there is a lot of work to be done before exciting railfan opportunities will be available.

Track, for instance.  At this point the HBTCo. operates exactly 0 miles of track. 

This photo was taken in LeBam on a Henderson Bay Branch (GN) owned industrial siding.

;)


Reg

Reg H
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Refer back to the photo of the window sash parts.







Here is the first completed window.   There are seven individual parts to each window.

I have completed six windows.  Which leaves 21 more to go...on this wall!!!

It took me about an hour to assemble and install this first one.  The next five went much faster.  
And I have figured out a way to speed the process up just a little bit more by modifying the sequencing slightly.

I will be an expert on assembling B.T.S. windows by the time this kit is complete.

Looking at the photo I see that I didn't get the drip strip quite centered on this window. 
I hope I did better on the subsequent five.  
I guess I better take some photos to check.

I was asking just the other day, "doesn't everybody downsize their scale when they turn 70?".

Reg

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Nice work on the mill so far Reg. 

The windows look great! 

Does it also get an interior? :bg:

Alwin


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Alwin wrote: Nice work on the mill so far Reg. 

The windows look great! 

Does it also get an interior? :bg:

Alwin




Thanks.

No interior to start with.  I may do the interior down the road.  
But for normal situations on the layout an interior would not be visible.   
But I am keeping the roofs removable in order to keep that option open.

Reg

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" doesn't everybody downsize their scale when they turn 70? "



Hi Reg  :wave:



I shouldn't worry about it too much.

That new Mill of yours looks HUGE to me.  :shocked:

You'd have to be at least 101 to loose it.

It's just the windows that are impossible to see. 



Nice work anyway.  :)

You're not installing double-glazing then ?



;)




Si.

Reg H
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Si:

Double hung, yes.  Double glazing, no.  

The temp in my basement is pretty stable.

Reg


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Right side is finished.







Now to start on the left side.

Yeah.  that is a mess of windows.

Reg

Alan Sewell
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Hi Reg
Looking really good. Some quality work there.
Seems the finished mill will be a  focus on that part of the layout. 
Quality of the kit also looks good but I wonder what is the sliding door for at the left of the wall. 
Have not seen anything like that on photos etc. 
Perhaps access to the conveyors and drive shafts under the log deck, head rig, and live rolls etc.
Look forward to seeing more progress.
Regards
Alan 

Reg H
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Alan:

I need to get things moved along before I can guess the reason for the freight door. 
I installed it in the open position just to add a little interest.  
Most of the photos of the mill show the other side with the "output" door. 

I hope to start on the windows on the left side wall this evening.

I am really driving this project because it is a major undertaking and other parts of the layout are on hold until it is substantially complete. 

Thanks for the compliments.  There are some pretty major blunders on this wall.  
I guess I can take some credit for having the resourcefulness to recover from my own mistakes. 

Reg 

Reg H
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There hasn't been much to post lately.

I have made some progress on the mill.  Nothing worth a photo.

Lots of great family time.

The airplane has been sucking up what free time I have had. 
Right now I am awaiting the results of the second compression check.  The right front cylinder came up low.
We are hoping that running the engine will clear the problem. 
If it doesn't we will have to pull that jug (airplane engines are very similar to the air-cooled VW engines) and get a replacement. $$$$$$$$

Reg


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I got another wall finished.

Photos to follow.

The holiday season has knocked a major hole in the time I get to spend on the model railroad and in the machine shop.

No, I am not whining.

Lots of splendid time with family and friends.

Reg

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I have completed all of the 82 double-hung windows.  I have started work on the 36 clerestory windows.  





I tried to take a photo of all the walls, but just couldn't get far enough away.

This kit is not for beginners. 
Though, so far, there have not been any operations that are particularly challenging, it being a laser kit, it is quite complex.

The biggest skill required, that would be developed building advanced craftsman kits, is patience. 
Assembling and installing all these windows is a long and tedious process. 
I have almost 30 hours just in these windows.  

The quality of the kit is tremendous.  Most parts fit perfectly the first time. 
Those that do need trimming need very little. 
The instructions are the best I have seen in a while. They are well written and, so far, seem well thought out. 

Having said that, I have modified the sequencing somewhat. 
Something that should never be done lightly, especially in a kit of this quality. 
But I remember trying to build walls after they had been assembled together.  
For many decades now, and both kits and scratch built, I build walls flat on the bench.  

Th instructions call for assembling the framing, applying the sheathing, and then going to work on the windows. 
I talked to Bill Wade, at BTS, about modifying that.  He advised against it. 
After reviewing the instructions and dry fitting some parts, I decided to go against his advice. 

We will see how that works out. 

I could have been a bit more creative and modeled some of the windows open, maybe included a cracked window or two. 
But I decided not to do that.  More out of laziness than anything else.  

Reg


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" I have completed all of the 82 double-hung windows. 

I have started work on the 36 clerestory windows " 



Hi Reg  :wave:



I dunno what to say.  L:



Just drink plenty of water & keep up on the vitamin pills !  ;)

All 118 windows will be done before you know it !!  :P



L :cool: :cool: kin'  C :cool: :cool: L !



Si.


Alan Sewell
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Hi Reg

As I said in an e-mail to you - Very impressive work on the mill.
 
I know I would have given up before now and mounted the wall on board and used commercial Grandt style window castings,
so admiration for what you have done.

Look forward to seeing the completed model (I guess you will as well!!) and to seeing how it fits into the Henderson Branch.

Happy New Year

Alan


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Alan:

I have to admit that I am not creative enough to have thought of your solution.

Too far into it now.   :)

The clerestory windows are somewhat easier, as they are deadlights, not double hung.
Five pieces per assembly rather than seven.  The fitting is easier, too.

Si:  It is actually kind of relaxing, except that modeling time is a bit dear at the moment.  I have child watch this evening. 
But I think I will bring the project board upstairs and set it up on the card table. 
My grandson (who is the child watch subject) can play video games while I build windows.  
With only the clerestory windows to deal with, there isn't much I need to schlep from the basement. 

Other projects are kind of building up on me. 
I just acquired a new headliner for the airplane. 
I have never installed a headliner in anything and I am missing some critical pieces.  So that will be an adventure. 
I also have new tires arriving on the 10th for the airplane. 
Airplane tires are tube-type on split rims. 
So installation kind of goes...with one hand hold the tire in place, with the other hand, guide the tube in straight, and with the OTHER hand... 
The weather stinks right now, so no flying.  But I want the airplane airworthy when the weather clears, so the tires have high priority.  

Oh.  And last weekend's wind storm blew half of our fencing down... I guess I should do something about that.

:)

Reg


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Progress on the mill is being made.





The walls are going together. 
This is the step that Bill Wade predicted would be troublesome with the walls sheathed.  So far, not an issue. 
I am only doing one joint at a time to make sure the glue dries before moving things around.





You can't have to many of these machinest's squares. 
They used to be expensive as the dickens.  The first one I bought, back in the 1970's when money was real money, was $30.

Thanks to the Chinese and Harbor Freight, I got a collection of 5 of various sizes for about the same price a couple of years ago. 
I have checked out their accuracy and they are dead on. 
Mostly these live in the machine shop, but get hijacked to the model shop when needed.

I have not trimmed out the clerestory windows yet. 
The windows are not centered top to bottom and I can't tell from the instructions and photos which way is up. 
So I will hold off on that trim until I can trial fit the clerestory walls. 





Reg


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Reg, see my comments in your other thread.

Reg H
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Progress is being made.  Lots more work to go. 

I have installed a couple of hundred parts.

There are over 1,600 parts in the kit.





Reg


Alan Sewell
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Hi Reg

Mill is looking good and a continuing tribute to you skill.
I assume the large opening is for the green chain. This that included.
I chickened out on that in my model mill and set the mill up so the green-chain goes into the back scene.
I use the John Henderson adage and try to model mainly those structures which are rail served as this conserves space.

As before I am envious of what you have achieved.
My modeling is progressing snail like.
However I found some old tapes I took at Simpson in 1999, had them transferred to a USB drive and have been editing it into a DVD.
Not as good as the recent DVD by  Golden Rail Video "Our Last Log Hauler", but I am pleased and it sure brings back memories.

Best regards
Alan


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Alan:

Thanks.  This is a major project.  I am enjoying the process quite a bit. 
The kit is very well thought out, and the parts fit together amazingly well, given that the medium is basswood.
 
Though it is a large and complex kit,
it differs from craftsman kits I have built that consisted of nothing more than a set of plans and a box of strip wood. 

A case in point is my 1/4" scale narrow gauge Howe truss bridge. 
The "kit", quite literally, consisted of a set of plans redrawn from the prototype plans,
and sufficient material, none of it cut or trimmed in any way, to build the bridge. 
There was also some NBW castings.





I suppose I ought to study up on mill operations.
I am just blindly following the instructions (well almost. I am finding I disagree with the sequencing pretty often) to end up with this mill. 

The largest door is for the milled product. 
If one does the entire complex, there is a raised platform from this door to the drying ovens. 
I want to arrange things so that, if room and finances allow, I can add other parts of the complex.

Reg


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Hi Reg
Yes it is a good kit of the mill building  and you are making a great job of constructing this.However I am not sure they know to much about sawmill design or the are making compromises. 
From what I have seen and studied in a mill like yours ( or mine ) heavy timbers would pass through the mill to a timber dock attached to the mill for loading onto railcars. Boards would be sent to the "green-chain" or sorting tables which was at right angles to the mill building. From the tables graded and sorted lumber would go to planing mill/dry kilns open air storage or rail shipping sheds .The attached is from Nelson Brown's "Lumber" text book of 1947 and shows the plan of a mill for rail a coastal shipping
Alan 

Attachment: mill 1.jpg (Downloaded 30 times)

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This is a plan of a generic Douglas fir mill from I think a "Timberman" of the 1930's
This has three sorting tables!!!
Alan 

Attachment: mill 2.jpg (Downloaded 29 times)

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Reg

Simpson did some aerial views of the mill at Shelton in the 1940's I think.
This is an enlargement of the "McCleary" mill next to the log dump (site of the old mill 3)
and clearly shoe the green lumber chain to the right of the mill next to the log dump tracks.

Hope this helps and not just adds to the confusion .

Alan





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Alan

This is good stuff. 
If you go to BTS web site they have a suggested layout both of the interior of the mill and the entire mill complex.

It is different than what you have provided.  Maybe east coast practice was different. 

Reg


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Alan:

I skipped over and looked at the BTS site. 
Working from limited knowledge of lumber mills, it looks like the Slatyfork mill is what we might call a stud mill.

There is no provision for heavy timbers. 
The process starts with a band saw (actually two. The mill is a "two-saw" mill), then a transfer table to an edger, and then to a swing saw.  

After the swing saw(s) there is a transfer table out to the loading dock, which is the dock off the larger of the side doors.  

Reg


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Hi Reg

I had a look at the BTS site as well,
and although there are some East Coast variations I think they have just made a lot of compromises,
or have been influenced by other modelers mills rather than going back to the prototype.

I am sure a two bandsaw mill would produce heavy timbers,
and there is no provision for grading boards just a transfer for unsorted lumber.

The tramway and drying yard looks way too small, as is the dry kiln.
Normally these are in banks and can cover an area nearly as big as the mill. Same for a planing mill.

I think the biggest problem is the lack of green chain,
and as often is the case with model mills, loading lumber straight on to railcars from a door in the mill.

Having said all this the main mill is a good basis for a model. 
Whether using anymore of the BTS models as they are is a good idea,
really depends on your thoughts about the accuracy of the product,
and how comfortable you are with this.

Sorry for the rambling it is getting late this side of the pond

Alan


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Alan:

I had to stop and get some real work done.

I think there may be a matter of scale here, too. 
I have a mill interior kit in 1/4" scale that is modeled from a small mill in northern California. 
Apart from being a circular saw mill, the layout, taken from the turn of century prototype, is almost identical to the interior layout of the BTS kit. 
Saw/edger/swing saw and out the door.  

I would think, from a vast ignorance, that a very small mill might grade the lumber in the yard. 

It has not been my intention of loading outbound cars at the loading dock. 
With no drying provision, I would think, again, working from my ignorance, that a very small mill would dry, to the extent possible, in the yard. 
Which would mean outbound loading would take place from the yard.  

Though the BTS kit is a pretty large structure for a small model railroad, as mills go, it is rather small. 

Another factor is that I am out to capture the essence, rather than getting down to rivet counting. 
That was always a contrast between my approach to rail fanning and John's. 
In fact, John did not consider himself a rail fan.  He styled himself an industrial archeologist. 
On our trips together, while John worked to collect all the details he could, I would stand back and try and capture the feel of the scene.  

That carries over into my modeling.

Reg


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Hi Reg 
Yes my modeling is also trying to get the right atmosphere rather than complete accuracy. Although I do like to feel I am basing things on reality.
I agree that dried lumber is likely to be loaded in the drying yard  and not straight out of the mill. However often it seems there is a loading took to which the lumber is taken and then loaded to railcars,
The attached shows this 
Alan  

Attachment: millyard.jpg (Downloaded 33 times)

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Reg
Going back again to the BTS mill I do think the missing part is the green chain. The transfer at the rear of the mill could easily feed one and nearly all rail served mills I have seen have this feature. From the green chain the graded lumber would go the the drying yard/dry kilns or maybe further processing.
The attached is from the Brown Lumber text book and shows a generic lay out.
I will post a couple of scans  next of the McNary mill in Arizona on the Apache Railway. 
Alan 

Attachment: mill 3.jpg (Downloaded 32 times)

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Plan of McNary mill from Sanborn map. Green chain is marked 
Alan 

Attachment: mcnaryplanfr.jpg (Downloaded 31 times)

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Aerial view of McNary mill
Alan 

Attachment: mcnarymillc.jpg (Downloaded 29 times)

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Finally - hurrah you say !!!!!
This is the preserved McLean mill on Vancouver Island . The green chain is in the foreground
Enough for tonight?
Alan 


Attachment: Picture1.jpg (Downloaded 29 times)

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Alan:

I am not quite certain that I understand what the green chain is. 
Looking at the final photograph, it appears to be a facility to sort and grade the lumber as it comes out of the mill.  

That would be easy to add as an extension. 
The one in the photo appears to be a roller table.  

I was already planning, space permitting, a raised loading dock.  

I find that I may have room for a single stall engine house that I more or less inherited from John. 
He passed it to me with instructions to do some minor repairs, which I didn't get to before he passed away.  
John stated that it had been built by John Labbe, which is pretty cool. 
But there is nothing on the model to verify that and it is a bit difficult for me to ask either one for further details. 

Reg


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Hi Reg

Yes the green chain or sometimes the sorting table is there to grade/ sort lumber.
I would have thought adding it to the side of the mill would be relatively easy.

Having an engine house from John Labbe via JohnH is as you say pretty cool.
I think somewhere I have something on John Labbe's modelling.
Can't remember if it included an engine house.

Any pictures?

Alan


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Alan:

I will take a photo.  

Reg

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Alan, et.al.

Here are some photos of the engine house rumored to have been built by John Labbe.










The lighting was not good and I had to PhotoShop (actually Gimp is the photo processor I use) to show any detail.

Reg


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I think this has some definite possiblities.





Obviously, the engine house was built with larger locomotives in mind.

Reg


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Hi Reg

Yes the engine house has some real atmosphere.
Would look good as part of the mill complex.

The GE 70-ton looks a bit lost, but I think that stall might be for working on skidders or yarders
( which would need a bigger vertical clearance) as well as lokeys.

I would think the right hand stall might be for lokeys,
but then again most operations with the exception of Simpson seemed to keep the working units outside.

Hope you can find a location for the shop  at Henderson Bay Lumber

Alan


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Alan:

Yes, I am pretty sure there is a place for this building.  It has a lot of character.

Reg

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I am posting more detailed progress on the mill in the Kit Building forum.

Reg

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The Labbe engine house will not be included in the current layout.

It is simply too large for the space available.  

I will start shopping for either plans or a kit for a suitable small engine house following completion of the mill.

Reg

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Reg

Sorry that the Labbe enginehouse/shops will not fit your mill scene.
Shame as it looked pretty authentic.

There are three smallish engine house plans I have in my collection :-

1.   A Russ Simpson plan of the Graeagle Lumber single stall barn and shops.
This measures a prototype 60’ x 80’

2.   In the “Logging Modelers Handbook” there is a two stall version as used by the McGoldrick Lumber Co.
This is 32’ x 74’

3.   In Robert Turner’s “Logging by Rail” on p87 there's a plan of International Timber 2 stall loco and car shop with machine shop extension.
This measures 65’x80’.  The loco single stall as part of this is 25’ wide
 
I can scan these for you if any is any good.
 
As far as kits I have always thought the old Muir Models Quincy engine house kit would be good if they are still available.
I think it was used by the Quincy Lumber Co in CA for a number of years.

 Alan
 

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Reg

I almost forgot.

When I visited Gilchrist in 2015, I took some photos of The Klamath Northern engine-house.
It could only just fit the big GE 110-Ton lokey, so can't be more than 60' long and has no windows just a door at the rear side.

Attached is a view I took then -
can just see where the door is on the right.

Alan





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Reg

This shows the location of the KNORR engine house, at the end of a spur in the mill.

Alan





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Alan:

I haven't found a kit that really attracts my attention, yet.  
So some plans would be mighty welcome. 
Those footprints sound doable. 

I have a large supply of styrene shapes and sheet. 
When our local hobby shop closed up I bought them out of their Evergreen supply. 
I used a small amount to build the 1/4" scale station that has shown up on this forum,
leaving a large a large stack for future projects. 

I also have a substantial supply of basswood strips and sheet. 
So I have plenty of materials for scratch building. 

The problem with the Labbe model is that it is mounted on a piece of plywood. 
I am loath to start hacking it up. 
In fact, it is something I just won't do.

Arrangements are starting to come together.  
I was hoping to get some more work done this week,
but the extended period of cold weather has seeped into my basement. 
Typically, the basement stays within a narrow range of comfortable temperatures year around,
but not right now, it has just been too cold for too long. 
I went down there Monday evening and it was just too cold to work.  

Even though the mill looks very complete,
I estimate that it is really about 50% done in terms of time. 
I have about 160 very, very tiny NBW castings to apply to the jack slip bents. 
The jack slip itself needs to be built (and it is pretty complex), then the two docks.  

I am scratching around on how to configure a green chain. 
One of the add-on kits from B.T.S. may work, or not. 
I need to do some more research on that.   

Following that I will start on the log dump.  
I have perused the instructions and it looks pretty easy.
Obviously a lot less involved than the mill.  

Then I will be ready to build the engine house.  
Once those three major components are in hand I can start figuring out the arrangement. 
I will eventually want to add some additional small features,
but those can wait until after I get the track down.

Reg


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Alan:

That is an attractive little engine house.
 
Something like that might work well,
though I might like something just a bit larger,
and with some additional character, like windows. 
It ought to have a machine shop, too. 

I think I would go looking for commercially available windows. 
Scratch building windows is very time consuming,
and I really want to get this phase of the layout, in its essentials, done.  
I can spend the next 10 years adding interesting details.

Reg


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After months of fussing, I finally decided on a course of action for the engine house for the logging operation. 
I ordered the Builders in Scale 2-stall engine house.

I know, the photo is of a single stall. 
But they didn't seem to have a photo of the completed 2-stall on their web site.





I will paint it to match the mill.

Reg


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Hi Reg

Glad you have sorted out the engine house.
Looks a nice kit.

Hopefully less complicated than the mill !!!

That lean-to to the left of the door, looks like it could be made into a car shop.
Wonder why there is not a photo of the two road version -
guess it will be more fun finding out.

Alan


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They have some photos of the partially assembled kit for the 2-stall. 

Just not any completed.

Reg


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Hi Reg

Looking for the kit on the Builders in Scale website, but can't see it.

Alan


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Alan:

First find the 1-stall.  There is a promotion for the 2-stall and 3-stall that will take you to the 2-stall (or 3-stall) page. 

Or, go to the price list, find kit 621 (if I remember) and click on the link.

Reg

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Thanks for the info Reg.

Have now found the correct part of the web-site.
Engine house looks good, though not sure about the shape of the doors.

Alan


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" Engine house looks good, though not sure about the shape of the doors "










My  'transatlantic take'  on American engine house door shape ...  :shocked:

... went a bit like this ...
... in the  M.M.M.M.M.& M.Co.  Drafting Dept.  :brill:



Foundations are made ...  :)

... still have time to change the door design, if I've screwed it up !  :f:



L:



Si.


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Reg/Si.

I would not criticise the kit design or anyone’s design for that matter,
and I am sure some engine houses had doors as in the BiS kit.  

However most I have seen are more simple rectangular.
Where they are different it seems to be to allow for extra high equipment,
such as skidders or cranes  to get into the shop.

By way of examples attached is a view of the engine house at Longview.
This did not seem to have doors at all in 1989.

Alan





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That was the inspiration for my engine house.

Alan


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Reg H wrote: After months of fussing, I finally decided on a course of action for the engine house for the logging operation. 





Just an FYI,
I'd go against placing anything of value outside a structure if you're modeling the Pacific NW.

Is that a lathe peeking from behind the shed?
That wouldn't be outside as the rain would reduce it to unusable scrap within less than one winter.

I see so may people placing heavy equipment outside on their layouts,
mostly to show the detail that in real life would be hidden inside structures,
but in that climate, nobody would do that.


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That was the inspiration for my engine house.

Alan





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Similar to Longview, but with doors, was the engine house at Hines on the ONWRR.

Alan





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Closer to the kit is the engine house at Kosmos. 

But note the height of the door, as this was also used to maintain equipment.
 
Alan





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As was the engine house and shops at Nimpkish on Vancouver Island.

Alan





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In my collection, the nearest I can find to the kit doors, is this at Railroad Camp,
where the high doors have the angled edges, but are covered by rectangular sliding doors.

Whatever is the case however, I am looking forward to seeing how the kit goes together.
 
Alan


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This is the photo.





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What kills me is I live very close to a lot of these locations,
but missed them by many years (I moved to the area in 1998).

I now look at all the RR history that was around as late as the 80s,
and how I missed it all, and it annoys me.

But I missed steam due to my age.

Born in 1969, I never got to see steam running anywhere,
other than tourist operations and the rayon mill at Elizabethton TN
(they had a porter 0-6-0 fireless cooker than run until about 1990).

But I missed Rayonier and all that.
And like a fool, I never went chasing the Longview or Shelton operations,
and then they were both done.
POOF, just like that.


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Lee

I know how frustrating in can be to miss out on things.

Luckily I am old enough to have seen steam on industrial railroads in the UK and in Europe in the 1960/70’s,
and I like diesels so that I have been happy to visit railroads around the world since steam declined.

However, there have been many things I missed such as real steam on the Cuban sugar mills,
and missed visiting steam in Java before the sugar industry there down sized.

Since I started getting interested in forest railroads in the early 1980’s,
I have been fortunate to make a few visits to North America,
but I did miss out on seeing Grisdale and the end of Rayonier when I had to cancel a planned trip.

I did however have the friendship of the late John Henderson who sent me photos and other information,
and encouraged my somewhat obsessive collecting of information- some of which has appeared on Freerails. 

I don’t like freelancing equipment or indeed operations, and need what I model to be rooted in the “normal”,
and that’s where information comes in, especially as much is “history” now.

Yes it is a shame you did not manage to chase things when you got to the PNW.
I made a trip in 1999 and saw some of the last woods ops on Simpson,
and also chased Weyerhaeuser up to Green Mountain mill.
Experiences that have stayed with me for a long time.

Best regards

Alan


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I have been working diligently on the mill.

The current project is assembly of the Jack Slip. 
It has turned into a major project. 
The assembly is reasonably complex to begin with. 
Add in my ham-handedness, and it just takes awhile to get it done. 

The bents took quite a bit of time,
and mating them up with the beams was time consuming in a calendar sense.  
I had to glue them one at time.  

And then,  a sequencing issue I did not see coming. 
The plans call for the lower three bents to have a small angle sanded in them,
so the walkways snuggle down properly. 
This should be done BEFORE gluing the bents to the beams. 
There is no way to complete that sanding, with the bents in place,
without damaging the bents.  

I have repaired every single bent at least once.  Some more than once. 
The sequencing (sanding the angles after installing the bents)
may work in 1/48 scale, but not 1/87. 

I took a break to look ahead, which I do often,
to try and spot sequencing problems, as above,
and to make sure I understand how the parts are to go together. 
I looked at the Jack Slip House. 
Crap!  More windows!

I have been fussing over the logging operation engine house. 
I have been trying to decide whether to scratch build it or buy a kit.  
I settled on buying a kit and went for the Builders in Scale 2-stall engine house. 
It came.  Great looking kit, but it will be a lot work. 
It is billed as a laser kit.  Kind of.

Remember the old "craftsman" style kits? 
I think of Campbell with die cut walls, cast windows and doors,
and a bundle of strip wood for everything else. 
Well, this engine house kit is very similar, except the walls are laser cut instead of die cut.  
A bit of contrast to the B.T.S. lumber mill where absolutely every single part is laser cut. 

Having said that, it is a great looking kit and I am looking forward to working on it. 

I will start on it after I complete the log unloader associated with the mill,
which I will start after I finish the mill. 

I need those three pieces completed,
so I can figure out how I am going to arrange everything in my limited space.

Reg


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Here is the slip jack:





It may look complete, but I am not satisfied. 
The most glaring error is that one of the bents
(look closely and you can see it)
is badly off center.  

The lower bents have to have an angle sanded in the top plate,
in order for the walkways to sit properly. 
The sequencing in the instructions has this sanding done,
after installing the bents to the main beams. 
It is very difficult to do that sanding without damaging the bents.

That one bent popped off while I was doing some of the sanding. 
I managed to glue it back on off-center and did not notice until the glue
(Titebond III, it is not coming loose) had dried.  

It seems to me it would be much easier to do that sanding,
prior to gluing the bents to the beams. 
Maybe even before gluing the top plates to the rest of the bent assembly.  

There are some other small problem, for most part only visible to me. 
I can live with those. 

I have emailed Bill Wade at B.T.S.
to see if I can get a new set of parts for the slip jack so I can try again. 
I just sent that email off, so no response yet.  

I don't really want to work on this assembly again. 
It will set me back about a month. 
But I am not happy with the current result. 
I can do better. 

Reg


Reg H
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Bill Wade says he can't give me any idea on the cost of replacing all the parts for the jack slip.

We are still communicating.  I have asked if it is feasible just to get the parts for one bent.

Baring all that, I just might try and scratch build a replacement and very carefully cut out the one bent that is truly awful.

Reg

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Hi Reg

I am assuming it is the last bent up by the mill that's the problem,
or that is how it looks like to my possibly un-tutored eye.

It is a bummer if you can't get a replacement,
but I did wonder if you had thought to use strip wood,
and build a wider bent which would not be off centre.

As this is the "modern era" I imagine you can assume the bents are creosoted,
and paint them black to hide any differences.

When I made my jack slip I used the Keystone metal version as the basis,
and mounted this on metal (plastic) legs from I think a conveyor kit.
Since this is away at the back of the layout,
it does looks OK compared with prototype photos I used as the guide.

I may post a couple of photos in a day or two on my Diesel Logging thread. 
I have kitbashed/mingled a dry landing log deck for the mill,
so that I can do the 1980's onwards.
This has been built to fit over the jack slip.

My Company"history" says they constructed a barker house,
to handle smaller logs in the mid-1970's,
and modified this to handle logs dry sorted at the mill  from around 1980.

Still a bit of work to do on it but will show were I have got to.
Look out for the post and let me know.

Alan


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Alan:

Actually, it is the third bent from the right. 
The slip is sitting at a slight angle on the cutting board,
which kind obscures the discrepancy. 
It is about an 1/8th of an inch off, which is really noticeable when viewed "live".  
How I missed that before the glue dried I don't know.

As today wears on and I have time to meditate,
I am strongly leaning towards scratch-building a replacement.  

If I can get the offending bent out,
while retaining part of the outside posts to establish angles,
and retaining all of the center posts to establish height, I should be good. 
I can use material from the parts sheets.  

Provided I can do that without damaging anything else on the assembly. 
The clearances are very tight. 

The big challenge will be separating the header from the walkways,
without damaging the walkways.
That would not be a disaster as the walkways are very simple to duplicate. 
I already had to do one.  
The part fell out of the sheet at some point. 
It should have remained in the box, but I can't find it. 

Reg


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"As today wears on and I have time to meditate"


I really don't think you will achieve World Peace -

leave it and it will be brilliant.


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VICTORY!!

After spending a long and tedious evening,
I was able to get the offending bent removed,
without damaging it or anything else on the slip.

It involved a very small X-acto knife,
with a brand new blade sharpened on my oil stone,
and a great deal of very gentle patience.  

I figured I had nothing to lose by attempting to get the bent off in one piece. 
It was a simple process of very gently working the blade against each glue joint,
re-sharpening the blade on the oil stone every few strokes,
until the blade was all the way through each joint.

It was very time consuming and had to be done very gently,
in order to avoid damaging anything. 
These parts are very small in HO and any appreciable pressure breaks things. 
Clearances are tight, too. 

But I succeeded. 
Saved me 100 bucks and a good three weeks of work. 

My hat is off to Bill Wade at B.T.S.
who was willing to work with me, to get the parts I needed,
in the event I decided to start the jack slip over from the ground up. 
I think we are both glad it didn't come to that.

Reg


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Hi Reg  :wave:



Dunno about that 'wonky bent' ?  ???



The whole Mill is looking AWESOME !  :thumb:



It seems like with photos ...  L:

... they either 'hide' all ones sins ...

... OR magnify them !  :f:



Seeing as the trestle part of the Slip-Jack in HO is only 6" long ...

... that is some sooooper-fine micro work Reg !

No wonder those pesky lil NBWs are giving you nightmares !!  :shocked:



:dt: :dt: :dt: :dt: :dt:



Si.


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Si:

Yep.  After a lifetime of working in 1/4" scale, HO seems really tiny.  

The slip jack is now fixed and finished. 
Actually, there is one more "sin" I discovered, but it is really hard to see. 
So it will remain with only me knowing it is there. 

I am really looking forward to getting all these craftsman kits finished
(mill, log dump, engine house, camp cars) that are associated with the logging operation. 
I am enjoying the process, but it really has knocked a hole in my schedule for this layout.

The mill is very close to completion. 
I just need to build the slip jack house and the two loading/unloading platforms.
Progress is on hold for a bit while I deal with some upgrades to the airplane mandated by the FAA. 
That project is sucking up way too much time and money.

Normally, I don't have a construction schedule,
but the original goal for this layout was to get trackwork and basic scenery done within a year,
so I could introduce the grandkids to operations (other than watching trains race around an oval). 
I am WAY behind schedule.

The flip side is that I am excited about having the logging operation a part of the layout. 

Reg


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Progress is being made on the mill. 

We are having 80+ degree weather here (somewhat unusual, quite unusual for June),
so I have an excuse to cower in the basement.





The jack slip is competed except for the handrails, and the jack slip shed is assembled and installed. 
Since the photo was taken the roofing has been applied.

I attached much of the roofing on the mill using a spray adhesive. 
It is beginning to appear that was not a good decision.  

I am saving the installation of some really fragile parts, until the mill is permanently installed on the layout. 
It is fragile enough as it is.





The rafters for this dock were a major undertaking.  They are very small and light. 
Since this was taken the roofing has been applied... using Elmers Glue-All and the roof installed. 
This dock is actually the output port of the mill. 
From here I will build a "green line" that will double as the departing loading dock.  

Every now and then I take issue with the sequencing.  This is a case in point. 
Had I read ahead a bit more, I would have installed the header for this roof before joining the walls together.
If you look closely you can see some "posts" under the header. 
It was the only way I could see to get it installed at the correct height and level.

I took another approach with the loading dock (for deliveries).  It's roof is a bit different.
I cut some spacers for the roof height and temporarily attached them with a dab of rubber cement. 

Another sequencing variation is that, for these small roofs,
it makes good sense to apply the roofing material prior to mounting the roof on the mill.  

Once all this is dry I am going to call the mill complete for the moment. 
There is a small porch yet to be assembled and installed, and a wrap around walk way. 
I am going to hold off on those until the mill is in its permanent location in order to avoid damage. 
In hind sight I should have done the same with the two docks.

Reg


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Hi Reg
 
Congratulations sawmill is looking really good. 
Don’t think I would have had the patience to do all the steps and would have cut corners so result would not have come out so well.
I see you have modified the jack slip so that it now goes into the pond and does not stop in mid-air as the kit originally had.
Well done and I look forward to seeing it set up on the layout.

I still don’t understand why BTS had the two loading docks.
I would have had to modify one at the rear as this should be where the green chain I comes out of the mill,
and the sorted lumber is packaged to go to the storage shed/yard or the planning mill.
Another dock at the mill seems unlikely I think.
Not sure what this would be used for except the occasional replacement bandsaw or drive machinery

I guess it’s now on to the log dump.
I know you will make a better job of it than Model Railroader seems to have done on their Olympia project layout

Best regards

Alan

 

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Alan:

Yes, the second dock very definitely appears to be for the receiving department. 
The photos show a crated saw blade
(provided in the kit as a detail...there is a stack of small details)
so that suggests incoming supplies.

I can see where one would want incoming supplies and parts,
to be separate from cut lumber coming off the planer. 

I intend to extend the "green line" dock,
into what will come close to representing a green line,
as I have observed in the photo (and others) that you provided.  

Yes, it is on to the unloader. 
I have stained all the parts that look like they need staining. 
There is not much to be airbrushed.  

I don't subscribe to Model Railroader,
so I don't know what they did to the unloader.

My two mags are the Gazette,
and Model Railroad Hobbiest, an online magazine.

Reg


Alan Sewell
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Hi Reg

Will be interested to see how you set up the green chain.
If you want any more info on that I will see what I have got 

Well given what you said I guess the other dock is for machinery and supply,
although I can't remember ever seeing something like that.
The nearest was the attached I took at Scotia in 1989,
which looks like a way of handling spare band saws into the mill. 
My visit was brief on a Saturday, so the railroad was not working,
but I did see their two GE 88-ton in the open fronted engine house.
And now it is all gone.

My comment on the Model Railroader layout,
was on the series running on Model Railroader Video Plus called Olympia2.
It is an On30 logging layout supposedly in Washington,
where there were not many narrow gauge loggers anyway.
David Popp originally built a dump with an A frame but no brow log.
After some comments he corrected this but left the brow log too far from the tracks and too low.
He also had the cable from the A-frame attaching to the cars rather than the brow log.
I did e-mail him on this, but no response.

Anyway will be interested to see how yours works out.

Alan





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There has been some progress on the log dump. 
It is going together pretty rapidly.





I know everyone recommends using a weathered gray finish. 
I have that option in my bag of tricks.  I just prefer the brown stain. 
In the end, I don't need to please anyone but myself.

I just about had a disaster with the beams. 
The instructions are not crystal clear on how they are to be installed.  
I went ahead and glued them in the way I thought they should be. 
I was about to pack it all up and go upstairs, pleased with the progress.  

But something just kept bugging me,
kind of a nag in the back of my mind, that it wasn't right. 
For one thing, I had left over parts. 
My experience with the mill is that BTS doesn't provide any extra structural parts.  

So I went back to it, looked it over and poured over the instructions looking for a clue.
Sure enough, kind of buried in an unrelated drawing,
the beams show up, and I had not installed them correctly. 
Fortunately, the glue had not firmly set up.

Had I not caught it there would have been some very serious problems down the road.

Reg


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Alan:

My thoughts on the green line are pretty simple. 

I am planning what amounts to a simple loading dock on which lumber can be sorted.  

Reg


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You just can't have enough clamps.  
This is the header for the log dump, visible in the background.  

This kit is going together pretty rapidly, compared to the mill. 
Note the pre-drilled (lasered?) holes for the NBW castings.  That is a major blessing.
This beam is made up of four separate pieces.

The clamps are from Harbor Freight. 
I have no idea how many of these clamps I have, some in the model shop,
some in the machine shop, some in my music bag for outside events. 
Harbor Freight sells these things dirt cheap.  
Sometimes they will have a bag of assorted sizes, sometimes just individually. 
They used to all be black. 
Some time ago they decided they had to be in "designer" colors. 
I always pick up a handful, or bag, whenever I am in Harbor Freight.  





Reg


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I have been trying to find plans for the Simpson #700 caboose
(in front of the post office in Shelton).

No joy. 
I have a bunch of photos,
but I guess I am going to have to develop a set of plans myself.  
I haven't checked the museum yet, but I will soon.

I had also hoped I could find a kit or ready-to-run caboose that was very similar. 
The only ones that I can find are "Out of Stock". 
So scratch building is my only option. 

One lesson I have learned is that, in the new environment,
if you see something you want, and it is "In Stock", buy it. 

I did find what looks like a great kit for a Great Northern wood caboose. 
I have lusted after it for some time, but it has always been "Out of Stock".  
It popped up "In Stock" at Walthers, so I jumped on it.
 
I won't need it for some time,
but I can be pretty confident it won't be available when I do need it. 

Reg


Lee B
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Reg H wrote:
One lesson I have learned is that, in the new environment,
if you see something you want, and it is "In Stock", buy it. 

I did find what looks like a great kit for a Great Northern wood caboose. 
I have lusted after it for some time, but it has always been "Out of Stock".  
It popped up "In Stock" at Walthers, so I jumped on it.
 
I won't need it for some time,
but I can be pretty confident it won't be available when I do need it.


A very good lesson.
I have a few kits lying around that aren't being made anymore and I'm glad to have them.

Great work so far, can't wait to see your take on that hack in Shelton!
I've seen it many times and I agree it'll make a fine model!


Reg H
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Lee B wrote:
A very good lesson.
I have a few kits lying around that aren't being made anymore and I'm glad to have them.

Great work so far, can't wait to see your take on that hack in Shelton!
I've seen it many times and I agree it'll make a fine model!


Me too. 
Don't hold your breath. 

A lot of work ahead of me before I am ready to tackle that caboose.  
I have plans for a similar, but shorter caboose I swiped from somewhere. 
I might go with that one.  

Reg


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The log dump is coming along.  





This week is extra busy with other commitments,
so I don't expect to make much progress until next week.

An observation... I am a luddite. 
In keeping with that characteristic,
I have a carefully hoarded collection of Floquil paint.  

However, current projects required colors that I did not have,
so I ordered some Badger acrylic paints.
 
My early experience with acrylics many years ago,
when the Polly S paints first came out, were not positive. 
In fact, they were very negative.

I have seen the light. 
I have now applied the Badger paints to wood, metal and plastic.  
They adhere great, and the clean up is really easy.
 
It isn't just the absence of the fumes, either. 
I used some of Floquil last night and it was just so messy.  

So I will be ordering up some more Badger paints
(actually, I already have ordered a couple more colors)
and will be squirreling away the Floquil,
against the day somebody comes along,
who wants to lay down some money for them.

Reg


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Hi Reg.

Hope you are now recovered from the 4th July celebrations.

I know we have had a few "off line" discussions on the log dump which I think looks pretty good. 
However we did discuss that in the the PNW the brow log would be a log!! not timbers.
I said I had some photos somewhere which might show how a log would sit.

Could not find a good photo until I looked on the wall in the layout room, and there it was!!!
A photo from I think a TimberTimbers or Tall Timbers calendar of 2001
(probably been there since 2003 at least)
of the Snoqualmie Falls Lumber mill with the unloader and the brow log on piling.

A scan is attached and might be useful.
I have used a balsa dowel cut down in a similar situation.
Good luck with things on the branch.

Best regards 
Alan





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Alan

Well, that certainly is classic PNW. 
I suppose I should have scratch built something along these lines. 
A much more "casual" construction, including the tipped trackwork. 
I love the steam-powered rail-mounted crane. 

I didn't want to get into all the research and design of a scratch built project
(which is often the biggest part of a scratch building project)
so went with the kit. 

While lacking a certain amount of verisimilitude,
I think it will make for an interesting scene. 

I received the replacement details for the boom,
and got some work on that done over the weekend. 

I am also working on finishing the trackwork for the Henderson Bay Branch. 
Once I got the log dump along enough to figure out where it would (could) go,
it became possible to determine the final layout for the branch line trackage.
 
The location for the turnout into the logging facility was critical. 
It turned out  (no pun intended) to need two turnouts from the branch line.
One to serve the mill, the other to access the engine facility. 

For the logging company, and the spur leading to, and across, the log dump,
I had to resort to an 18" radius curve.  
Though I may play around with the arrangement some,
to see if I can get it to at least a 20" curve. 
I really would like to see a 24", but there just isn't room.

All the branch line turnouts are #6.  
The logging line will have #5 turnouts and Code 70 rail.  

There will be a bit of an hiatus as I have to build a 12" to the foot fence. 


Reg


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Hi Reg  :wave:



I hope the 1:1 fence is going OK ... & you haven't made it 7mm high by mistake !  ;)





The log-dump is looking GREAT !  :thumb:



Do you find any good 'real' wood around where you are, for logs & poles etc. ?  L:



:moose:



Si.


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Si.

No, I managed to remember to keep all the fencing 12"/1'. 
Fencing is done. 

This weekend I get to regrout a bunch of brick work.





This is a view of the front of our house. 

The picket fence has all been replaced and painted since this photo was taken.
Note the brick walk way and the brick wall below the picket fence. 
All that brick work needs to be regrouted.

I am not looking forward to it.
  
Fortunately, we are having a mild summer. 
Temps on Saturday should be in the high 60's to low 70's.  

Reg


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Hi Reg  :wave:



I like your pad !  :cool:

It would make a great looking model.

But you won't find me trying to model roofs like that !  L:



Is that what might be called a 'Victorian Eclectic' style, or sumtink like dat ?  ???

When was it built ?

I guess the front is all original, with maybe add ons at the back. 



:)



Si.


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Reg H wrote:



This is a view of the front of our house.


Reg, I've driven by this house, I'm sure of it.

A few streets behind railroad avenue,
to the northwest of where the Shay is sitting,
heading toward Loop Field, right?


Reg H
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Lee:

Yep.  That's the one. 
On Franklin Street one block north of Railroad Avenue and one lot west of 12th.  


Si:  

It started out, I believe in the 1920's, as an 850 sf "workman's cottage". 
Similar to company houses all over the US,
except Simpson did not go in for company houses. 

Some 35 years ago the additions started by the guy who was the local house razer,
using materials from the building across the street,
which was a junior high school and is now apartments.  

The original part of the house is to the left of the turret.  
There was a large shop building in back,
with an underground wine cellar between the house and the shop. 
At some point, the wine cellar was used as a foundation for a new kitchen and dining room,
which then joined the shop to the rest of the house. 
Half the shop was converted to a family room. 
The rest is a garage that is now my machine shop.  

The wine cellar is now the basement in which my model railroad resides.  
We first encountered the house in 1995.  
I had a business that had failed,
and we were living in a borrowed travel trailer, parked in a friend's back yard.   

We met the previous owners in church and my wife visited them in the house,
returned to our trailer and expressed an interest in someday living in that house. 
Which seemed an impossible dream at the time.

But life went well (for the most part) and we purchased the house in 2000.  

And that certainly is a long rabbit trail that has little to do with model railroading,
except the basement.

Reg


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On another note...I got the crane for the log unloader finished,
except for some paint, last night.  

The NBW's have been a major pain. 
I just don't have the steadiness of hand to work on stuff that small anymore.  

The finished product will do,
but it doesn't really do justice to the quality of the kit.  

So, despite a season of lots of work around the house,
some progress is being made on the railroad.

Reg


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Reg H wrote:
Yep.  That's the one. 
On Franklin Street one block north of Railroad Avenue and one lot west of 12th. 
 


Careful, Reg, now that I know where you are,
I might just show up asking to see the layout!

I haven't been to Shelton in a while.

I used to come to the logger parade every year with my WW2 living history group,
but trailering the Jeep all the way there was a royal pain for such a short timeframe.

The group was founded by Steve Gay who lives out on Cole Road,
his family used to own the newspaper there and he knows everyone in the area, it seems.

Those parades were always fun and sometimes the Simpson would be running that day as well.
I still feel like a fool that I didn't go chase the Simpson, not once.


Reg H
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Lee:

At this point it looks better in photos.  

I chased Simpson a few times with John Henderson. 

I have a lot of railfan photos that need to be scanned,
and some method of making them available.
 
Not a whole lot of Simpson, but some. 
Mostly Burlington Northern.

Reg


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" And that certainly is a long rabbit trail that has little to do with model railroading,

except the basement "



Hi Reg  :wave:



Half the reason I tune in here to 'The Freerails Channel' ...  :thumb:

... is for adventures down long rabbit holes !  ;)



If I wanted more predictable & yawn inducing fodder ...  :y:

... I guess I'd watch more T.V. !  :dope:



:moose:



Si.


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The log unloader is essentially complete.

Here it is in what I think will be its general location in relationship to the mill.

I need to work on the lighting on this part of the layout.





The inhaul is just hanging there. 
I haven't quite figured out how I want to terminate it.  

There are some small details that will be completed,
once it is in it's final location and scenery is roughed in.

I am not as pleased with this kit as I am with the mill,
either in terms of the kit itself and my assembly work.  

It is still quite a nice piece and will make a colorful addition to the layout. 
But there are things that BTS could have done better,
and some things I could have done better.

One glaring example is the angle of the boom.  It should be a bit higher. 
But I assembled it with reference to the configuration of the parts,
and looking at the photos. 

It would have been better if I had changed the assembly sequence,
and not installed the boom until the reel house had been mounted on the piling.  


Reg


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I have started work on the engine house.

This is the south wall.





Back side view





This kit is no where near the quality of the BTS kits. 
It is a good kit, just not quite up to the excellence of the BTS stuff.

A big difference is that it is obvious that Builders in Scale,
are working with a much lower capacity laser.  
The sheet materials are VERY thin, and everything else is strip wood.
 
It also appears that the laser is designed to primarily cut in one direction,
and must kind of jog to cut at 90 degrees.  

I also have some disagreement with their sequencing. 
They recommend painting all the parts before assembly.  DO NOT DO THAT!!! 
The sheet materials are so thin, and made doubly so by the scribing,
that trying to paint it without any bracing will almost certainly result in warping.  

I plan to paint the walls after the framing is all done,
so that there is some substance to the structure.

Note the framing on the walls. 
The instructions recommend assembling the framing over the full size plans,
much as one would build a balsa airplane. 
The wall sheathing is then to be added to the framing.  
Those frame pieces are 1/16" square!!!! 
Coupled with the paper thin sheathing, that just looks like the hard way to me.

On this first wall I dimensioned the framing from the plans,
and then assembled it on the sheathing. 
So far that approach has worked out very well. 
It is the approach I will use on the rest of the kit.

The idea of assembling that framing on the plans, removing it from the plans,
and then trying to get it situated properly on the wall sheathing (or vice versa)
just does not look like a good idea.

My Chopper came in very handy getting all those vertical members the same length. 

The one thing that Builders in Scale have it over the BTS kits is the full size plans. 
It helps, in conjunction with the photos, visually how things are supposed to go together. 

This is a very small engine house. 
The little GE locos I have for the logging operation will barely fit. 
But I think it will fit in well with the rest of the layout. 
A big engine house would look very much out of place.


Reg
 

Alan Sewell
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Hi Reg

Impressed by your progress on the mill etc.

Wish I had any progress but rather going backwards,
since having to repair the damage caused by the grandson’s playing with “Pop’s trains”.

I have decided to relay a little used spur as one serving the company’s Plywood Division.
But then need new switches and rail joiners before I can start (Yes this is fun!!!)

The unloader looks good.
However re your query that the “in haul is just hanging and not sure how to terminate”.
I would answer by saying it needs cutting off at the base of the unloader crane and attach a hook.
Unloading in this case, would I suspect be dangerous but common.
 
There would be straps attached to the brow log.
When the train was positioned for unloading,
the crew would pass the straps under the logs and OVER the car frame.
These would be attached to the unloader and then tightened, tipping the load,
and hopefully not the car, into the pond.

I will attach some photos by Ivan Ergish (via John Henderson),
on the unloader at Shelton, which show a similar situation.

Best regards

Alan


Alan Sewell
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Although The Shelton unloader was self-propelled,
its operation when unloading, is the same as a fixed version.

In the photo, the cable has been passed under the load,
and the engine is tightening the line.

Alan





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A view from the pond as unloading a car starts.

Alan





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Head on view,
showing the unloading cable hooked onto the loader awaiting the next loads.

Alan





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Alan:

Well that is pretty darn simple. 
I believe they called this kind of operation "parbuckling". 
And, yes, it does look dangerous. 

Judging from the photos,
it appears that the crane angle on my unloader is not all that far out of line. 
Especially if I keep log loads low.

I am planning on using the Kadee log cars. 
I guess I better go shopping and find out if they are still available.

Re:  Grandkids playing with the trains...
my grandkids are under strict orders to touch nothing unless I am present.  

Reg


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Reg H wrote:
I also have some disagreement with their sequencing. 
They recommend painting all the parts before assembly.  DO NOT DO THAT!!! 
The sheet materials are so thin, and made doubly so by the scribing,
that trying to paint it without any bracing will almost certainly result in warping. 


Reg, do you reckon this would happen if you painted both sides? 
I've noticed that thin wood material, even scribed, painted on both sides,
and then placed under a weight until dry, will still retain its flat state?

:us:

I do make a point of painting or staining both sides of any sheet before even cutting.


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Alan:

Further thoughts....
since this whole part of the layout was not in the original vision,
I am very determined to get it completed.  

I have pretty much put a lot of other things on hold,
until this is to the "scenery roughed in" stage. 

I haven't been in my machine shop in months,
and all my spaces (model shop, machine shop, hangar),
are all in need of clean up and re-organization.  

A lot of timing has been impacted by my Dad's passing away. 
That occurred on August 28th just before midnight. 
The process started on Sunday morning and my sister and I kept vigil,
only leaving for some food and a few hours of rest. 
Predictably, he passed away when neither one of us was there.  

There is another week of events culminating in the memorial service on Saturday. 
I am tired and need of rest.  The modeling activity helps quite a bit.  

Reg


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Doug:

That strategy might work. I have done that in the past. 
But the sheathing in this kit is REALLY thin. 

It seems to me it is easier to assemble subassemblies,
with the framing in place, and paint the subassemblies.  

I will paint the wall assemblies once the framing is in place,
and before they are assembled together. 

I can paint the window frames before assembly into the walls. 
Or perhaps not. 
I am going back and forth on the window frame color. 
The Henderson Bay Timber Company has a company standard structure paint scheme.
Tuscan red with white trim.  
But for the engine house I might paint the trim tuscan red as well.  

There is quite a bit more framing that could be done on these walls. 
The plans show a purlin half way down and angled bracing at each corner. 
None of that is necessary for the model's structure and I don't intend to detail the interior,
so I am going back and forth on including that framing, which is a lot of work to get right. 

I could do the corner bracing different from the plans. 
They show the bracing mitered into the vertical framing. 
I could install an angled brace on the inside edge of the vertical framing. 
That is how I would have designed and built the prototype. 
Not as "craftsman", but easier and actually a more effective brace.  
That brace would show through the open doors.

Reg


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Alan:

I need to sort through my oddments and impedimentia,
and see if I have an appropriate hook.

Reg


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Hi Reg

Firstly sincere condolences on the passing of your father.
Even if it was expected it is always a severe shock.

I remember with my mother we had sat with her all day, and then about 11pm,
the nurses said nothing was going to happen before morning.
Just as we headed out of the hospital car park we got a call to say it was over.

Glad the modelling is helping in this case.

I think the unloading method is called tight lining,
using a gin pole or an A-frame.
It sure looks a very dangerous job to me.

If you have difficulty sourcing the connected cars,
I have some kits and NWSL brass cars that I might be disposing of, let me know.

Forgot to say the engine house is beginning to look good,
but I would not worry too much about fitting the lokeys in.
With the exception of Simpson, most working units I have seen,
sat outside the barn rather than inside.

Best regards

Alan


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Alan:

Thanks for your thoughts.  
It was time, but that doesn't make it easy.

I just ordered some Kadee cars,
but I expect I will need more to truly populate the scene.  

Maybe we can do some more horse trading.  
Dollars are a little tight right now, thanks to the upgrade to my airplane's avionics. 
But I do have a $500 rebate check coming from the Federal Aircraft Administration.  
Most of it is spoken for, but it will give me a little flexibility.

Reg


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My condolences too on your father's passing.

A sad and difficult time and I wish you and your family well.



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Here is progress on the engine house:





I would not classify this kit as strictly a laser kit. 
In reality, it is a craftsman kit with some laser cut parts.

All that framing is cut and fit from raw strip wood.  

Accepting the parts count (1,600) the BTS mill could be assembled by anyone,
with experience assembling fairly complex plastic models. 
Everything except the window glazing is laser cut.

Not so this engine house. 
It requires the ability to cut small pieces to precise length and angle. 
An exercise that takes some practice to get right. 
Note that the rafters have bird mouth cuts. 
Those are tough enough 12" = 1'.

The upshot is that, needing some quiet time in the evenings, this project is perfect.
Carefully cutting and fitting all these pieces is quite relaxing,
if one concentrates on the task and not the goal.

Reg


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First rafter for the engine house. 





I was not thinking clearly and posted some material about the new engine house over on the HO/OO threads.

A synopsis here:





The method proposed for fabricating the roof trusses did not exactly float my boat. 
They wanted to build these in a fashion similar to building balsa model airplanes.

Since the framing material is very small, and is not balsa,
they proposed a clear wrap over the plans,
and using a temporary adhesive to hold the parts in place.

Ummm.  No! 
I built a jig.  
It works great.

The top jig is the assembly jig,
the bottom one is the cutting guide.

Reg


slateworks
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Good idea for the jig Reg,
especially where multiple parts are required so that they all come out the same.

When I was building Updah's turntable I used the "model balsa airplane" method,
stretched kitchen klingfilm over the plan and built on top of that.





No temporary adhesive was required, although a fair few pins came into play,
and I must admit that only one part was required and much of it was balsa!


Reg H
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Yep.  I would have used that technique had the strip wood been larger than 1/16" square.

Even cutting the bird's mouths requires a great deal of care to prevent splitting the wood.

Reg

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This project has brought back fond memories.

I started building craftsman kits while still a kid. 
It was all I could do to scrape together enough money to buy the kit. 
A full collection of tools was not within financial capabilities.

So my primary cutting tool was a razor blade. 
Not even new.  They were my Dad's used blades.
Until he started using an electric shaver. 
Then I had no choice but to buy an Xacto knife and a small package of blades. 

The kit manufacturer recommends fresh razor blades as the primary cutting tool. 
Since I keep a supply on hand for various purposes, I elected to follow that advice. 
It works really well for this small work.

Of course, the concept of a "fresh" blade is new to me.  

Reg


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Reg H wrote:
Of course, the concept of a "fresh" blade is new to me.  


:)  :bg:


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Howdy Reg, on the used single edge razor blade cost...
I went to a LHS and they were out of the 100 count razor blade pack, more coming for $14.95.
A guy in the r/c car department told me that the auto stores had them for lots less.
I went by a O'Riley store and they had 100 packs of single edge razor blades for $2.99 !!!
Needless to say, whenever I think the old blade is getting dull, I get a fresh one.
I cut brass sheet, plastic, various woods, and fingers and love the fact that I got a great deal on blades.
I used the old double edge blades when I was a kid, it's a wonder I still have fingers!

Woodie


Reg H
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For some reason I thought the Kadee log cars were R-T-R. for decades.
Not so.

Kits.  Very good looking kits. 
I just acquired six of them. 

Once I get the mill and engine house scene in decent shape,
I will set up an assembly line for those cars.

I have made great strides on the engine house. 
I want to repeat, this is very much a craftsman kit, with a few laser cut parts. 

There is a great deal of very precise measuring and cutting that needs to be done. 

One challenge faced, surfaced when I went to replenish my supply of gray wash.  
My ancient bottle of ink had dried up!!!

Determined not to buy a $5 bottle of ink and spend $6 getting it here,
I went looking for it. 

After spending $10 in gas,
I found some at Joanne Fabrics in Olympia. 

Reg


Alan Sewell
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Hi Reg

Yes the Kadee kits are very good and I have built up a few.

However Rivarrossi did some very very similar ready to run cars a few years back,
and they may still be in model shops, and are on Ebay.

One thing you might want to consider is what the timeframe is,
since after the mid-1970's most log cars had high stakes,
and later these were welded up so smaller second growth timber could be hauled.

As I said I might have some cars for disposal.

Best regards

Alan


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Alan:

I may cheat on the stakes for operational reasons.
 
My current plan (subject to change at any moment)
is to manually carry log loads from the mill to the reload,
so that cars are traveling to the reload empty,
and from the reload to the mill loaded.  

If I had planned the layout around the mill operation from the beginning,
I might have invented a plan that had some creative loads-in/loads-out configuration.  

My problem with Rivarossi is that much of their stuff has non RP-25 flanges. 
I have a GN steam engine (well, it is lettered GN)
that will probably end up as a park display in the town I have planned. 
It will not run on Code 83 rail.

In terms of some cars with which you might part,
what do you have and what are your terms.  
Shipping is certainly a bit pricey between here and there.

Reg


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Reg,

Michael's also carries a variety of inks. 

Check first if they have what you want in stock.


Alan Sewell
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Hi Reg

The Rivarrossi cars I have, have RP-25 or better wheels.

Those I have painted/weathered and are in use on my railroad,
run on my code-70 track with no problems.

Alan


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Alan Sewell wrote:
The Rivarrossi cars I have, have RP-25 or better wheels.

Those I have painted/weathered and are in use on my railroad,
run on my code-70 track with no problems.


I think the steam engine I have is one of their earlier offerings.  

Almost all of my HO stuff was acquired from an estate.  

Reg


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Have I mentioned that the Builders in Scale engine house,
is really a craftsman kit with some laser cut parts?

I have?  OK.  It's the truth.





These are the roof vents, partially fabricated and assembled. 
Do not consider this kit unless you have significant craftsman kit experience. 
This represents a full afternoon's work.

It is a great kit. 
My finished engine house will be a nice addition to the layout. 
If someone were to devote a bit more time,
like a year of evenings and weekends, to the kit (I have cut some corners),
they could produce a truly stunning model from just the contents of the box,
plus paint, stain and glue. 

The BTS mill challenged my patience with 1,600 laser cut parts. 
But all the parts were laser cut.
This engine house is challenging my skill,
where most of the parts have to be fabricated. 

Of course, some of my slow progress can be attributed to age. 
My eye sight is not what it used to be, nor are my manual dexterity and steadiness. 
It just means that I have to  jig more things up, and use my magnifier.  


Reg


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Returning from the HO/OO page...

I have abandoned the laser kit engine house.  It is just too small. 
The parts have been carefully stored away for future use. 
I may convert it into something else, like a car repair shed, sometime in the future.

In it's place I have opted for the Cornerstone brick two-stall engine house. 
I simply did not want to go after an expensive and complex kit again. 
I am very anxious to get this logging operation completed. 

So far I have given the brick work a wash with my ink/alcohol mix,
painted the window frames white in accordance with HBTCo practice,
and painted all the parts cast in gray plastic grimy black,
after some airbrush adventures detailed elsewhere. 
Oh.  I also painted the doors tuscan red.

The ink/alcohol wash is very subtle, but the diluted ink gathers in the mortar lines,
creating a shadow effect that helps accentuate the brick work. 
The brick work will get a shot of Dull Coat to kill whatever shine is left. 

I am rethinking the window frames.  I may repaint them tuscan red. 
The white just seems to scream "look at me!!".  
Not exactly the effect for which I am looking.  

I want it to obviously be there,
but I don't want it to detract from the logging operation center of attention, the mill. 

Reg


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Here is the Cornerstone engine house essentially complete. 
I need to touch up the paint and cut a base.

A little paint did wonders for the basic kit. 
The green trim looked positively revolting,
and the gray in which the roof was cast just did not look right. 

Once I got my airbrush techniques for the acrylic paint in order,
I was really pleased with the results. 
The paint goes on very evenly and lays down nicely.

While this structure doesn't have quite the character a more complex kit might have,
I am confident it will work well on the layout. 
The roof (slate is more an "east of the Mississippi" practice.  But who will notice?) is removable.  
Once it has been on the layout for awhile and collected some dust (I live in a mill town),
I will give it a shot of DullCoat.  Lazy man's weathering.  

I may do some more weathering, but it will be very light.  

From various sources I have acquired an impressive collection,
of barrels, crates, and other oddments & impedimentia.  
It will be fun spreading all this around the logging operation. 
What is a logging operation without industrial detritus.

Reg





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Reg

Engine house looks pretty good,
and to me the roof looks more like metal sheeting than slate
(I would notice that !!).

This side of the pond, slates are normally no bigger than 24”x 14”,
and very often much smaller.

The roofing looks much bigger than that,
but perhaps in Mississippi slates are bigger.

As for the brick, which you know I am not sure of in the PNW (Simpson excluded),
well I would justify it as the mill producing wood “brick-pattern” novelty siding.

I am sure that existed and the engine house is an advert for the company product.

I have a “Sears  catalogue house” as the mill office on my layout,
which serves the same purpose.
It is in the background of the attached photo, slightly out of focus, sorry.

Looking forward to seeing the mill site develop.

Best regards

Alan   





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The idea of a house as a mill office is a good one. 
I may steal that idea.

The dispatch office for the railroad operation does not need to be so large. 
The office for Simpson (now used by PS&P) is pretty minimal.

I will have some photos of progress a bit later in the day. 
All the cork is down and smoothed off.  A couple of things were a challenge. 
Trackage was not envisioned in the location of the engine house. 
So some of the sub-roadbed is a bit rough.
I had to do some shimming and Shurform work on the roadbed. 
The log dump is designed for either a deeper pond or higher terrain than the mill. 
I built up the road bed using the cork, and then filed it down to a consistent slope. 

More progress here depends on the arrival of a shipment from Walthers. 
I wish this stuff was available on Amazon Prime. 
Getting stuff the day after you order it is the next best thing to a local hobby shop. 
I have turnouts and scenery materials coming from Walthers. 
I ordered ground throws directly from Caboose Industries.  

I learned a lesson.  I have always used the same ground throws. 
It's been a challenge with MicroEngineering turnouts, because the throw rods are very narrow,
with a very small hole for the connection to whatever will be operating the turnout. 
In the past I fashioned a wire rod to connect the Caboose Industries ground throw to the turnout. 
It turns out (no pun intended) that Caboose Industries has a set of adapters,
one of which is specifically designed to work with the ME turnouts.  

While awaiting supplies I did a little work on the GP-30. 
I am very close to having the Kato chassis fit the Bachmann shell. 
It looks like one more bit of grinding on the chassis should do it. 
But I am taking my time in between cuts to make sure I understand what is going on. 
It would help if I had X-ray vision. 
It looks like the only remaining challenge is to figure out how to arrange the headlights.
Kato and Bachmann use two very different approaches to mounting the headlights,
and guiding the light to the appropriate location.


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Here are some views of the main components of the mill site. 

Obviously many details are to follow. 
I will spend years adding fun stuff to this site.

Track laying will commence as soon as the track arrives.

For photo purposes I need to come up with a means of hiding my ugly basement.














Regarding the use of brick to build the engine house,
it actually makes a great deal of sense. 

When built it would have housed steam locomotives,
along with oils and greases, welding gases,  grinders, oily waste, etc. 

In short, a goodly collection of flammable material.  


Reg


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That engine house you are using now,
could be thought of as tying your layout in the here and now to model railroad history,
as it sure reminds me of one offered by the plastic model company Revell before I was born;
think it originated in the 1950s.

Have seen it in 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, model train magazines.


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Yes, indeed. 

If Walthers didn't outright purchase the molds for the old Revell engine house,
they sure were working from the same set of plans, or nearly so.

The Revell model has some differences.  

Reg


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Well, my box from Walthers arrived yesterday.
 
I dived down the basement as soon as I got home from work,
with the intention of getting some track laid at the mill site.

Except that I messed up. 
I was very careful in reviewing my centerlines to determine the turnouts I needed. 
At that time it looked like I needed three left hand turnouts.

Wrong.
I needed two left hand and one right hand. 

This trackwork is so tight that three of the five turnouts will need to be built up as a single unit. 
That unit will need the right hand turnout.  So I am stuck again.  
I will be able to use the left over left hand turnout at the woods end of the operation. 

I am improving the time by assembling a couple of the kits I acquired from Alan Sewell.
This kit is a simple laser kit that produces two skid shacks. 
I am going to use one of the skid shacks as the logging company's railroad operations office. 
I am sure I will find some use for the second shack.

I spent a pleasant evening last evening (after kicking myself for mis-counting turnouts)
airbrushing the shack parts. 
Thanks to my recent education in the use of acrylic paints, all went well.  

I improved the evening further by running a train. 
I don't have all my operational facilities completely in place. 
So I have a string of cars parked at the west end. 
I pull the caboose of the end of those cars, tack it on the other end,
run the train to the east end of the layout, and repeat the process.
It makes for a pleasant 35 to 40 minutes of operation. 

I am deeply grateful for the tip about coating rail tops with a very light layer of graphite.
The two previous On30 layouts in this basement were plagued by track cleaning problems. 
I have cleaned the track on this layout precisely once in the 2 years of operation.
 
After I clean rail tops following painting the track,
I run a very hard piece of artist's graphite along the rail tops. 
So far I have not needed to clean track, or wheels, since.

Reg


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Some great progress has been made during this Thanksgiving weekend.  

All of the Henderson Bay Timber Co. railroad camp and mill trackwork is in place.

The "pigtails" for connection to the main power bus are also all in. 
The next step is to crawl under the layout and connect the pigtails to the power bus.  

The mill is off to the one side, right side in one photo, left side in the other.


Looking east.





Looking west.





It was a bit tricky fitting in the additional turnout to give me a run-around. 
It involved some surgery on one of the turnouts. 
But it fits and seems to work just fine.


Reg


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Hi Reg  :wave:



L :cool: :cool: Kin'  C :cool: :cool: L  ! 



Amazingly quick progress (if you ask me) ...  :thumb:

... even though, as you've said, things like BIG kits  :dt:  take a while.  :java::time:



The mill, dump, log-pond & unloader, all look nicely placed in the whole scheme, to my eyes.  :)



Any R.R. Boss will be celebrating a brick or stone enginehouse (probably) ...

... especially as they've heard all the stories of wooden ones BURNING DOWN !  :shocked:  :f:  ;)



Great photos of all the new yard trackage you've got laid on the previous << Page.



I like Alans photo he Posted as well, he has some inspiring scenes of mooodern logging.  :shades:



:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:



Si.


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Thanks, Si. 

It is coming along. 
There has been a brief hiatus due to running out of some critical supplies.
 
Of course, now we are into the holiday season,
progress will be further slowed by all the festivities.  

I miss being able to purchase bits and pieces locally, or even semi-locally. 
I needed a handful of suitcase connectors. 
Does anyone anywhere near me have them in stock?
Nope.  Gotta order them online. 
I need, maybe four. 
The smallest quantity I could find was a package of 50.

Likewise, LEDs. 
I am cooking up a scheme to convert a pair of Lifelike FA's to DCC. 
It is not a terribly complex operation. 
But the incandecent (sp?) headlights need to be changed to LED. 
I need two.  I ended up ordering an assortment of 100. 
Very reasonable price ($7.57 on Prime), but still. 
What am I going to do with the remaining 98? 

Of course, there are the two Athearn GP-9's. 
I bet they will need LEDs.   

I am improving the waiting time,
by assembling a skid shack kit that I acquired from Alan Sewell. 
It will serve as the logging railroad operations office.

Reg


Alan Sewell
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Hi Reg

Very impressed with how things are going.

Makes me ashamed of how slow progress is on my layout.

Hopefully that will change and I have posted a couple of things,
over on my Diesel Forest Railroading page.

Glad you are finding a use for the kits I sent.
Will be interested in progress on that and the rest of the layout.

Best regards

Alan


Reg H
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Alan:

I have been able to get some time in this fall. 
Which is a blessing.

I am quite enjoying the use of commercial track. 
I have not used commercial track since my teen years. 
I put down all of the engine terminal track in one evening. 
Handlaying I can fabricate and install one turnout in a long evening or full Saturday.  

The sheds (there are two) kit is quite useful. 
A well done kit as well. 
The first one will be done soon. 
I am not putting this one on the skids. 
The second one will probably go up at the woods end and will be a true "skid shack".  
I am looking forward to building the rest of what you sent.  

I hope to get the wiring finalized at the mill/engine camp end today. 
We will see.
Lots of holiday goings on. 
The wiring got held up because I ran out of suitcase connectors. 
When I bought my first supply (I resisted using them for a long time)
my local hardware store stocked a variety. 
I got a couple of packages of fifty,
which served well because I had the entire railroad to wire.  
I came up three short (If I don't damage any, which happens)
to finish what I currently have laid. 

The hardware store still stocks some,
but just two sizes (red and blue) they have found most popular. 
No one else seems to have them. 
Off to the internet. 
The smallest quantity I could find was a bag of 100. 
Sigh.

I have to ring off and go write a sermon. 
I am up tomorrow evening.  

Reg


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Really liking the layout of the mill. 

Makes sense and is massive enough to make car loads of lumber. 

Love following what you have going on.

:rah:


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The Holidays have definitely slowed progress, but all is good.

I was planning to get some work done last evening after work.  
I got home to the announcement that Emily's boyfriend's parents were coming over for dinner. 
Emily is my youngest daughter and has been living with us for the last few years,
recovering from a series of life disasters. 
All is good with her now.

In fact, her boyfriend led me off to a corner. 
You can guess what that was all about. 
The boyfriend is now fiance. 
It was a great evening...but no railroad work.  


The skid shack/logging railroad ops office is finished.  





I am not completely pleased with the shingles, especially the ridge cap. 
I will work on that some more. 
It looked pretty good until I stained the shingles,
and the stain loosened the Alene's Tacky Glue with which I installed the shingles.  
Sigh.  

The next skid shack
(the package had enough parts for two)
will have a tar paper (black construction paper) roof.  

This may, or may not, be the final location. 
The thing is just really cute from all angles. 
I will make a final decision once I have the timber company office assembled,
and I can play with layout a bit.

The 1/4" plywood "foundation" will be buried in scenery. 
The plywood will be screwed to the base, the scenery contoured up to it,
and the building set loose on the plywood. 

All my buildings are easily removable and all have access to the interior,
in case, someday, I want to add some lighting. 

With my supply of 500 3mm and 5mm LEDs
(though some are colored)
the possibilities definitely exist.

In the case of this little building,
the roof is removable. 


Reg


Reg H
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Well, some progress was made over the last few days, despite my predictions.

The first problem solved,
was the tendency for locomotives to derail on one short stretch of track. 
The spur leading past the mill and to the log dump.

It took a few pounds of scrap steel bar and Liquid Nails...





The problem seems to be solved.
 
The Liquid Nails is a bit messy,
but once it is painted and this stretch of track is buried in "dirt" it will be just fine. 

The big project news is the completion of the timber company's offices.





I think this will serve very nicely. 

I have to say, this is one of the finest plastic kits I have built.  
It is very well engineered, the details are fine (one must be very careful),
and everything goes together as it should. 
A rare occurrence.  

The very miner negatives are the colors and two bits of sequencing. 

The model comes molded in three colors. 
The only one I found acceptable is the foundation color. 
The main building color is white.  Everything is white. 
The walls are white, the window frames are white, the porch railings are white. 
The box shows a main color of blue, which it is not. 
Not a big problem for me as I intended to paint it,
no matter what color it was molded in.

The other color that did not work for me was the roof,
which is molded kind of a sickly gray. 
I painted it rail brown.  

The first sequencing issue I had,
was the timing of installing the back stairs and basement access. 
I would have done the front porch first. 
It would have been handy to be able to set the model on the back wall,
while working on the front porch.  

The front porch is a bit tricky. 
The porch floor, railings, and roof all have to come together,
and fit the mounting locations on the front wall. 
I spent a bit of time trying to make the instructions sequencing work. 
It didn't. 

I found that installing the porch trim (the pieces holding up the floor) first,
was the best beginning. 
Second step was to glue just the front railings in place. 
Then I carefully dry fit all the rest of the porch parts,
and held them together while spot gluing. 
Once I was sure everything was lined up I final glued everything.  

A really big point is the way the roof structure is designed. 
It is configured so that it would be very difficult to get the angle wrong.  

This kit is a recent offering. 
If this is the direction Cornerstone is going, it is clearly the right direction. 

A brief word about my adhesive. 
I use MEK.  It works extremely well. 
I apply it with a small brush,
with the parts held together either by hand or with whatever works. 
The caution is the MEK is highly volatile
(it evaporates rapidly, which is a good thing from an assembly standpoint)
and the fumes are not good for you. 
I buy it in quart cans from the local hardware store. 
But, for use, I transfer it to a very (I mean VERY) small bottle. 
Only the bottle enters the model shop. 
The quart can stays in the garage. 
I will post a picture of my "gluing station".  

So this is how the mill site layout looked this afternoon.





After taking the photo,
I started thinking I may want to move the office building to the other side of the tracks.
I need to reach through that area, or very close to it, to operate turnouts.


Reg H
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As promised, here is my set up for handling MEK.





I have included the pencil for scale. 
The block is two pieces of 3/4" plywood screwed together. 
The tiny bottle holds the ready supply of MEK.  
The hole is sized so I could use a bottle up to 1" in diameter.  

This rig keeps everything handy and prevents the MEK from getting spilled. 
Even if it is spilled, the small amount in the bottle will cause limited damage. 
I keep the lid on except when actually dipping the brush. 
That limits evaporation,
so the supply lasts longer and the fumes are greatly reduced. 

I have developed a skill in opening the bottle one-handed.

How do I get MEK from a quart can into that small bottle,
without making a smelly and flammable mess? 
I use a pipette. 
Actually a scrap piece of brass tubing I had laying around.  

This approach can't be beat for assembling plastic models.

Reg


2foot6
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Great idea,

will be making something like this.

........Peter


Reg H
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Sometimes you just have to be a little creative...





There are two places where there just isn't room between the tracks for a ground throw.

I was thinking of just depending on the Micro Engineering internal springs. 
But I was not totally comfortable with that approach.  

One more like this.  

Reg


Reg H
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Sometimes you have to REALLY be creative.





The long operating rod was simply too flexible.  

More Later.


I got interrupted by our family's traditional Christmas Day movie. 
This year it was Star Wars.


The operating rod and the stabilizing fixture will be less obvious once they are painted.

The ground throw closest to the tracks is going to have to be moved. 
It clears the NMRA gauge, barely, but every locomotive I run by it touches it. 

Speaking of locomotives,
I couldn't resist programming one of the Bachmann GE 70-tonners I bought.  
Very disappointed.  It does not run well. 
It looks good, but it does not run smoothly at slow speeds. 

I don't know what I am going to do, yet. 
But poorly running locomotives are not acceptable. 
At least they were very inexpensive. 
I guess I got what I paid for. 

Reg


Steven B
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Reg,

I found that if I put the rod in a tube, then the flexibility is eliminated. 
This works really well for long runs on the Caboose throws.

Just an idea. :!:


I also had to pair up two 44 Tonners to make them run well. 
I had issues with them staying alive through turnouts.
 
I ran jumpers (MUed them) between them,
and went from 8 to 16 wheel pick up. 

I was happy after that. 


Reg H
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Steven:

I thought of that. 

But I didn't twig to the flex problem until after I had fabricated the rod. 
I couldn't get a tube on the rod because of the multiple bends at each end.

I wasn't excited about fabricating a second rod. 
There are seven bends in that rod, each one having to be pretty precise.  

If I had to do it again over that long a distance, I would use a tube.  


My two 70-ton GE's don't seem to have a pick up issue. 
 
The first one stalled once,
but it was on a stretch where I hadn't done a complete job,
of cleaning the paint off the rail head. 

Reg


Reg H
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After spending some time with the two 70-ton GE locomotives,
I have pretty much determined that they are not worth the effort. 

Since I paid for each loco about what a good decoder costs,
I shouldn't be too disappointed that the product does not live up to expectations.

I cleaned the wheels, lubed the gears, and programmed CV02 to 255. 
The CV02 setting is one that has reportedly improved slow speed operation. 
I might comment that "improved" does not equate to "fixed".

A decoder that included BEMF would probably fix the problem. 
The Bachmann decoder does not have that feature.  
So I popped a shell to see what might be involved.
 
All the electronics are on one board which is hard wired into the locomotive. 
No eight-pin connector. 
So replacing the encoder would be a rather major project in micro-soldering.


Then there is this little sweetheart.





This is an Athearn "blue box" SW7. 

It is one of the locomotives I acquired in the estate sale that launched this layout. 
It was practically free. 
I say that because I paid $400 for a slew of locomotives,
that included four DCC ready Kato GP-35s
(two of which are now DCC equipped and fully operational)
as well as several locomotives from several other manufacturers.  

I dug the thing out and tried it in the 00 mode.  It runs really well. 
Way better than any Bachmann diesel I have ever owned
(I had no issues with my On30 steam locos). 
It is also much easier to convert to DCC,
than it is to replace the decoder in the Bachmann GE locomotives. 

Of course, it will have to be stripped and re-painted, but that is not a major undertaking.
Some details need to be added.  I have visors. 
I am thinking it needs spark arresters.  "Behive" arresters would look nice. 
They would be, theoretically, easy to fabricate.  A straightforward turning job. 
But I am not sure about successfully completing such small details to my satisfaction. 
I may try.  Isn't that the point of having a machine shop?

You would think someone would make that detail. 
But I haven't found any yet. 

If anyone thinks they have a use for the GE locomotives,
you pay for boxing and shipping and they are yours.

Reg


Last edited on Fri Dec 27th, 2019 11:56 pm by Reg H

Reg H
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No sooner said than did.  Good old eBay.

I found some new old stock Details West spark arrestors.  

Reg

Reg H
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Wow! 
Life changes can happen in a big hurry.

Due to a confluence of events, my family's financial situation has changed dramatically.  
For the better.  

The short version is that the events will almost certainly result in a move. 
We love our home.  But, due to health challenges, my wife has difficulty navigating stairs. 
And our home has plenty of those.

We have tried to come up with a plan to live on just the main floor. 
But the house is not well configured, or easily remodeled, to make that an attractive alternative.

The move will probably be at least a year in the making.  So work will continue on the current layout.
But I will be limiting how much time and money I put into aspects of the layout that would not survive the move. 

All of the structures are easy to remove.  Although I will not be finishing the log pond.
Completion of that would make removal of the mill and the log dump difficult in the extreme. 
I also may not build the woods end of the logging operation. 
But we will see. 

Work will continue, if for no other reason than I enjoy doing it. 
But I also have a good supply of scenery materials, and plenty of rolling stock projects waiting in the wings. 

In fact, I got started on the scenery around the mill complex over the weekend. 
I got stymied by my selective parsimony.  
I was incensed that Woodland Scenics wanted five bucks for an 8 oz. spray bottle. 
I got four at Walmart for about three bucks.  

Only to find that two of the four could not be made to work, and the other two did not work very well.  
Scenery work is on hold while I await the arrival of two Woodland Scenics bottles. 
I was fortunate to find them on Amazon Prime, so they will be here in a few days.  

Ah well.  

I started one of the Kadee log cars. 
I had played with the idea of setting up an assembly line.  I am glad I didn't. 
The kit is pretty involved to assemble.  I have made a couple of mistakes on the first one. 
So I am glad I didn't try to assemble all of my collection at once.

These are great kits, just not exactly what I expected. 
A lot of the assembly work is cleaning flash off the white metal castings. 
They are beautiful castings, but a bit flashy.  And REALLY small. 

The sequencing in the instructions is very well thought out.  I deviated once, and that was a mistake. 
The instructions, apart from the sequencing, are not well written. 
They are long paragraphs, so one has to be very careful in stepping through them not to miss a step.  

Photos will follow.

Reg


Reg H
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Some views around the mill site.

The plan is to convert the SW7 to DCC and repaint to Henderson Bay Timber Company.















I ran out of Code 70 track.
 
If there was a hobby shop anywhere within striking distance,
I could just go buy a single length. 

But I don't have that option. 
So I don't know what I am going to do.





I was thinking of working on the woods end next, which does make some sense. 

But further thinking indicates that it makes more sense to get some work done on this east end,
the major part of which is the town across the tracks from the mill, or vice versa as the case may be.


Reg


Reg H
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First log car.





Five more in this set to go.

I learned quite a bit building this kit.  The casting are superb.  

Some rivet counters may note there are some details missing. 
With my 70-year old eyesight and manual dexterity there are just some things I can't do.

Some may also note the modern brake wheel. 
I dropped the wheel that came with the kit and my shop floor seems to have eaten it.

Reg


Michael M
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Reg,

I recall reading somewhere that the DCC board on those Bachmann 44 & 70 tonners was often a problem. 

Did you try using straight DC?


Reg H
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I found someone who could use them.

Reg

Alan Sewell
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Hi Reg

And a Happy New Year to you and all on Freerails.


Just catching up with the posts on this.
Have to say you have made much more progress than me over the holiday period.

The ground cover and scenery around the mill looks pretty impressive,
and realistic from what I can remember round the mills in Washington.


The prospect of moving is I imagine daunting,
but exciting especially if it improves life for you and your wife.

Hope you will be able to retain some of the parts of the layout,
in what I expect will be a new and enlarged Henderson Bay Branch


Sorry you had problems with the GE 70-tonners.
They are nice units but I always think a little small for the log haul,
although I know Weyerhaeuser used them on the Mohawk line into Springfield OR.

I have a 70-ton ”motor” I am using as the mill switcher while my Alco S-2 is having some work done.
The GE works very well BUT then I did have a new sound card and a “current keeper” fitted
so maybe that helped to overcome your problems

I think your use of a SW7/1200 will be more prototypical.  There are many examples as you know.
I might not add spark arrestors as they strangely don’t seem to appear on any woods lokeys,
but I would look to change the headlight to a Pyle twin beam as that seems pretty common.
If you have not seen it p before attached is a prototype “motor” I photographed at Longview in 1989


Glad you have found the Kadee log car kits to be good. 
I think they are some of the best on the market.

The only issue I have (and am probably being too pedantic) is they have both arch-bar trucks and high stakes.
I think arch-bar trucks were banned from interchange (i.e. running over the NP/GN branch),
in the early 1940’s and high stakes did not become common until the mid/late-60’s.

However I guess you could imagineer some local agreement with the logging company having prior rights.
I too had problems with the loss of brake wheels but replaced them with a cut down switch stand lever,
to represent the ex-Schafer cars Simpson had


Look forward to seeing more

Best wishes

Alan


 

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Alan

Good to hear from you. 
Happy New Year back at you.

Thanks for the compliments on the ground cover.  Woodland Scenics is my savior. 
Just buy the products and follow instructions. 
All my previous efforts using old school methods and materials looked really awful.


I really like the Kadee cars. 
The castings are pretty incredible.  I would like to see the molds. 
I am not sure about the grimy black color. 
I might try a brown or tuscan red on the next one. 

I am sure by now you have guessed I am not a rivet counter. 
Not even close.  If I like it, I model it and run it. 
So I am not bothered by the arch bar trucks. 
I do prefer the older style brake wheel,
but the modern brake wheel is all I had in my parts bin.  

I might even acquire and run a steam locomotive or two. 
One of the articulated logging locomotives would be very attractive. 
I have come across video of the Rayonier steam operations filmed in the 1960's.  


I started work on the SW7.  
I got the basic DCC conversion done and it works amazing. 
Those old Athearn blue box drives are pretty smooth to begin with. 
Tweak them a bit with DCC and they run very, very well.
I may be looking for another SW7. 

Though I note that somebody is coming out with an SW1200. 
I am now leary of factory DCC, though brands other than Bachmann may be better. 
If I sprung for one of the new SW1200's,
I just might order the DC version and do my own DCC conversion. 
Especially if the DC version features the 8-pin plug in.


Funny you should mention the headlight. 
I had a bit of a disaster. 
My plan is to install headlights at both ends. 
I originally planned to remove the clear plastic inserts and slide in LED's. 
In the process I managed to completely destroy the front headlight. 
So it is getting replaced anyway. 
In hindsight, I should have left the plastic lens in place and installed the LED behind it. 
I will do that at the cab end. 
Meanwhile I am awaiting a return call from Precision Scale Co. to order a new headlight.
I haven't figured out how I will illuminate it, but I am going with the dual headlight,
as that seems to be very typical of logging locomotives.

I am going with the spark arrestors. 
I like the look.  

Reg


Reg H
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I can't say as model railroading is fun right now. 
But I am moving forward. 

We got a bit of wintry weather here today. 
The snow is not much, but I wasn't excited about dealing with 40 miles of ice,
in order to get to work to push some not-very-urgent paperwork. 
So played hooky. 


I am working on the DCC conversion for the SW7. 
Mostly it is going well. 
But the parts that are not are quite definitely not.  

One handicap is the size of everything. 
There are times I question my move from 1/4" to HO. 
I find I spend time doing tasks that should only take a minute,
but drag on because everything is so small.  

That aside, I had wired in the decoder,
and test made a test run of just the chassis. 
It worked great. 
So today I was determined to get the lights wired in and the shell on.  

I got everything wired up,
and spent quite awhile fighting trying to get all the wires into the shell. 
Gave up, shortened some of the wires,
and taped the others on to the top of the decoder,
which, in keeping with a very informative YouTube video,
I had taped to the top of the motor.
Only to find that the shell will not go. 

It turns out that what works well in the Athearn GP-35 (or whatever it was),w
ould not work in the SW7. 
There is not enough vertical clearance to mount the decoder on top of the motor.  
So I taped the decoder into the shell towards the front.  

The shell went on just fine.

Put the loco on the tracks
(the decoder had been previously programmed)
and selected the loco. 
Punched up Func. 0, and the headlight came on. 
Hit the reversing button...no rear headlight. 
Hmmm.

Applied some throttle...no go. 
Rats.

Took the shell off. 
The plug was not completely inserted in the connector. 
Fixed that.  Back to the layout. 
Neither headlight came on, but the loco runs great.

I spent a goodly amount of time trying to test LEDs with the multi-tester.  
I couldn't get them to test.   I couldn't get one I knew was good to test.  

Put the multi-tester away and swiped a button battery out of my calipers. 
The LED I knew was good lit up.  The LEDs in the loco did not. 
Definitely burned out.

My suspicions are with the resistors. 
I ordered some additional LEDs (like the 500 previously ordered weren't enough)
because they were shipped with appropriate resistors.
Perhaps not. 

So I ordered up some resistors that meet the spec in the Digitrax Decoder Handbook.
Of course, they ship in quantities of 50.  For $5.65. 
We shall see how that works out. 

I also took a stab at getting the lettering off in prep for a repaint. 
I found quite a few chemicals that will remove the paint,
but they all leave the lettering intact. 
Years ago I used to use brake fluid to strip Athearn shells. 
I don't have any at the moment, and I am not going to brave the ice to get some.
Maybe I will pick some up tomorrow.

Any suggestions would be welcome. 

Reg


Reg H
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I tried the brake fluid on the damaged shell.  

It worked pretty well:





I say "pretty well" because the lettering is still faintly visible.  
I will give this shell a coat of paint to see how it turns out. 
I really hope the lettering does not ghost through.

I had originally planned to use this shell with a new headlight. 
But then I ran across a cow and calf (powered cow, dummy calf),
on eBay for a very reasonable price. 
I will be using those shells. 

The cow had a bit of a hitch in it's git-along going through turnouts. 
A quick check confirmed that one wheel set was out of gauge. 
I will fix that when I tackle converting this loco to DCC,
and getting it painted in Henderson Bay Timber Co. livery.   

Also, "pretty well" because I managed to spill brake fluid all over the model shop.
What a mess.   It is mostly cleaned up now, thanks to kitty litter.
From now on, paint stripping will take place in the garage/machine shop,
not in the model shop.  

In other news, the new resistors arrived. 
I now have 50 to play with, along with my 500 LED's. 
I will be tackling that project soon. 

Not this weekend, though. 
My wife and I are headed for the Oregon coast.  We love the area in the winter.  
The only problem being the weather.  Right now it is 30F and snowing.

After a lengthy discussion with our financial adviser,
we will not be making a decision on staying or leaving our home for at least a year. 
And we are leaning towards staying here.  
Model railroad construction will proceed on that basis.  

Though I have re-thought the location for the woods end reload. 
I was going to run it over top of some of the branch line's trackage,
and put that branch line trackage in a tunnel. 
I have decided against that. 
It will shorten the run for the log trains by a small amount,
and will keep the branch line trackage in the open,
where it can be seen and enjoyed once some scenery gets done in that area. 

I have sufficient Code 83 track left over from the branch line to build the reload. 
I had originally planned to do that in Code 70,
but the visual contrast between Code 83 and 70 is not as dramatic as I thought it would be. 
I have the Code 83, I can't seem to buy just a few sticks of Code 70, so Code 83 it will be. 
The one required turnout will be Code 70 because I have it.  

The reload will be at a slightly (something around an inch or inch-and-half),
higher elevation than the branch line trackage for visual separation.  

The rest of my day is a study in contrasts.  
Part of my day relates to my small airplane. 
I got a call from my mechanic yesterday,
who is in the process of doing the annual air-worthiness inspection, 
telling me the compression in two cylinders is low. 
I have not been able to fly the airplane very much this past year,
and a quick run up may fix the problem.  Or I may have to replace two cylinders.
Which will put a serious cramp in my model railroading activities.  
But the hangar doors are frozen shut this morning, so the run up will have to wait.
The flip side, never take the complaints of an airplane owner too seriously. 
He, after all, does own an airplane.

The other contrast of the day is my wife's birthday. 
I am married to the most incredible woman in the whole world,
and celebrating her birthday is a big treat.


Reg



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