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Marty Johnston
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Hi All,


I have enjoyed and been inspired by much that is posted here,
and thought that I would add some of my own work. 


Like many of you I enjoy small homegrown tramways that never quite made the big time.

Supplied by ship nine months of the year and serviced by a 2' tram,
the Von Leipnik Interplanetary Transportation Co. is located on a small island in Lake Superior. 

The site includes a machine shop, library, laboratory, astronomical observatory,
as well as a hand-full of other structures. 

It's 1926 and Otto von Leipnik is working hard to repeal the 2nd law of thermodynamics,
in his quest to push the frontiers of technology.


A plan of the layout and a few photos are attached.


There is a bit more of my modeling at my website - needs an update...

http://www.narrowgaugechaos.com/


Regards

Marty


Attachment: OVL_overview.jpg (Downloaded 193 times)

Marty Johnston
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The majority of the layout resides in a bookcase/wall that separates my modeling area from the laundry room.

On the right half of the scene you are looking out through the machine shop at a ship bringing in supplies for the laboratory. 
Only part of the ship's hull fits into the scene. 

The left-half of the scene opens onto a wood and sheet metal building that extends out over the water. 
The main floor serves as an assembly area with offices and a design studio above in the loft. 
In the laboratory all manner of rocket parts, perpetual motion machines, and robots will be in the midst of fabrication. 

Track runs through all of the building facilitating the transportation of various components,
to the test site and launch pad by a small industrial tramway.
 
The tramway also serves the small observatory out on the eastern point of the island,
separated from the main island by two deep channels. 

To keep the layout from filling up my small workshop I fabricated steel bridgework that hangs off of the wall structures. 
The bridgework connects the scenes and gives my models a bit of running space.


If all goes well there should be some photos below.


Attachment: OVL2-2019.JPG (Downloaded 191 times)

Marty Johnston
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more

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Marty Johnston
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the observatory turn

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Marty Johnston
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side wall

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Marty Johnston
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Here is a sample of brickwork for the machine shop.

Attachment: Brickwork2.jpg (Downloaded 162 times)

Marty Johnston
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Front wall of boiler shop.

Attachment: Brickwork1.jpg (Downloaded 157 times)

Larry G
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Marty,

what scale are your models?

Also, what are the bricks made of?

Very nice work, love it all.

Larry Gant

Appetite Mine


Marty Johnston
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Hi Larry,

The layout is 7/8ths scale. 
I almost went Gn15 like you did to get more modeling into my space,
but my eyes thank me for the larger size. 

I will post some more showing how I make bricks. 
In short I made a latex mold and cast them in plaster with concrete dye for coloring. 
The dye works well and I don't have to worry about scratching the color off of the bricks.

Regards

Marty


Ken C
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Marty

A most interesting concept for your Railway and very well done,

looking forward to more progress photos.

Like the idea of the ship viewed through the shop, very impressive  :apl:


Lee B
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Wow, I'm impressed with what you have so far!




Marty Johnston
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Hi All,

The pictures that follow show my brick mold, bricks in various stages, and the dye used for coloring. 

First I tried adding a number of different paints into the plaster but the bricks always ended up too pink. 
I then used artist quality paint powders but they were really messy - wife was not thrilled :) with the dust that I tracked about. 
I then hit on using concrete dye and it works really well. 
I ordered it online and have been in the brick making business since. 

While this mold works fine I have some improvements that I plan on implementing on the next version.

Regards Marty


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Dye

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bricks just poured

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Marty Johnston
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Ready to remove

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Marty Johnston
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Just few hours to go .... (I wish) 
This view is looking through the main shop towards the dock and boiler house.
Not sure why the photo rotated. 
All for now,
Marty

Attachment: ViewThroughWindow.JPG (Downloaded 132 times)

Last edited on Thu Feb 14th, 2019 01:53 am by Marty Johnston

Alwin
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Hi Marty,

That is some impressive brickwork! :shocked:
I first wondered what those green lines were for, but I see they are for a different stone pattern.
Clever.

Alwin


Rob V
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Hello Marty

The photo rotated cos of Smart Phone camera probably

How is the work going on the layout?

Rob


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Excellent stone work!
Of course, it is REAL stone work.
Marty, I wish I had your patience.

Woodie


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Marty,

Great brickwork!

Looking at your photos looks like you've got some pretty tight curves. 
How tight is the radius on those curves?


Tom Ward
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Marty - Wow! 

Great concept.  Beautiful modeling. 
Your locos are real works of art.  Actually, all of it is. 
Lemme see more.  Por favor.

- Tom


Marty Johnston
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Hi all

The track has a 10in radius,
but I laid the gauge a little wide on the curves. 
It works fine with the small size equipment that I run.
 
There are a few more photos posted on my website.
 
http://www.narrowgaugechaos.com/VLIT/VLIT.html

The scenery has been sitting for a bit,
while I work on my new C W Hunt cars and track. 
 
I am interested in small radius operations, since I have limited space.  
C W Hunt specialized in small radius locomotives and cars.
 
The prototype used outside flanged wheels and some interesting axles,
to minimize friction on curves.
 
He standardized to 12 foot curves, which works out to 10.5" in 7/8ths scale.

I plan on converting over the railroad to the new style of track,
once I get some working rolling stock and locomotives. 

Some info on Hunt at:

http://www.narrowgaugechaos.com/RPC/Material/IndustRREquip/CWHunt/CWHuntIndex.htm

Here's a tipper car design in progress.

Regards  Marty  





Helmut
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One of the advantages of this system is,
that you can make swiveling axles that align themselves to the sharp curves,
as seen on p.26 of the 'industrial railway' catalog.

You need not widen the gauge in curves when using this principle.

When building my garden R.R,
I was tempted for a while to use such a system,
instead of the conventional one.


Lee B
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Marty Johnston wrote:
The layout is 7/8ths scale. 


I had to look that up, and it turns out to be 1:13.71 scale.


The designed SE scale has been applied to it by some,

though I'd never heard of it:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SE_scale


Si.
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Hi Lee  :wave:


There's quite a bit of 7/8ths activity on Freerails.  :old dude:

I know you've seen it as well.



Francks large-scale fishermen, in the 'Micros Minis Switching & Pizzas' Forum, are 7/8ths.

His excellent 'Woolcombe Bay' on the English coast ...

... & also 'Vestvagoy' his Norwegian harbour (with 7/8ths Don Johnson (from 'Lost') )  ;)



Juergen is also a dedicated 7/8ths dude these days ...

... & is constructing what is going to be an awesome exhibition layout !  :)



Charley, absent of late, has a scattering of 7/8ths through one of his Threads as well.

There are a few others around on the Site also.



:moose:



Si.


Helmut
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The only 'drawback' is when it comes to road vehicles,

they are not that low-priced.


R/C truck modeling is very popular in 1:14, but don't ask,

I've seen kits offered for >1000€


Lee B
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Si. wrote: Hi Lee  :wave:
There's quite a bit of 7/8ths activity on Freerails.  :old dude:

I know you've seen it as well.


Yeah, but lots of folks don't know what "7/8" really means for a ratio of scale.

I read that and started wondering what the ratio was, as well,
and was surprised (yet not surprised) to see there was a name for that scale already.


Si.
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" was surprised (yet not surprised) to see there was a name for that scale already "


Yes ... There is a name for that scale already ... It's  7/8ths  :cool:



You might find it suggested on Wikipedia to call it  SE Scale ...  ???

... but anyone who's actually interested in it, or doing it, generally refers to it as  7/8ths


I think people find 7/8" per foot easier to figure out than 1:13.7 ...  :brill:

... try & divide that up without a pocket calculator !  L:



Franck states his models as  1:13.7  also ... In his Freerails Topics like :-

'Vestvagoy' - A Norway Harbour - 7/8ths - 1:13.7 Scale



GREAT looking 'C.W.Hunt' Tipper car Marty !  :bow:



One day  :time:  my Tamiya pit-crew & Jackie, WILL get painted !  ;)



:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:



Si.



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