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Design Challenge - Layout Needs To Raise To The Ceiling Over Bed
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 Posted: Thu Aug 15th, 2019 11:25 pm
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Derek McGuckin
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My son is off to college and has given his permission along with moms blessing to move my modeling bench into his room.


There is room for a shelf layout along two walls over the modeling bench. 
There is even more room over the bed if I can figure out a way to raise a layout section up to the ceiling.
His room is a converted office and his bed fits into a closet like space without doors.
 
The nice part is that walls are available on each end of the layout section,
so it should be fairly simple to anchor some type of rail for the section to slide up and down.
Some type of counterbalance would be nice as well so it move easily.

Any ideas where I could find articles or website on layouts that have such a feature? 
I hope what I'm describing makes sense!


Here is a picture of the bed in it's alcove.





The two walls are 6' 6" apart and the bed is 44" wide. 
I'm thinking a 2'x6' module would fit nicely with allowances for any raising hardware on the ends.


Derek


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 Posted: Fri Aug 16th, 2019 06:56 pm
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corv8
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Had a similar idea long ago ....

Having a layout in the garage,
which would either rest on the roof of my car,
or on legs, when the car is out.

Means of lifting would have been a winch
(I actually bought it, it's still somewhere)
intended to lift a truck tire from the ground, up to the bracket,
that would hold it under the bed of the truck.

There are cables and wheels to change direction of the cables,
available at truck parts stores.

I considered this strong enough for a medium layout,
without mountains of plaster,
as a full size truck wheel may have 200 pounds or more.

However,
I then occupied a spare room for my layout,
so the plan was never realized.




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Gerold
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 Posted: Fri Aug 16th, 2019 08:23 pm
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Si.
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Hi Derek  :wave:



Duane, in his ... Getting Trains Running Again On The 'Torres y Prietas' ... Thread in the Narrow Gauge Forum ...

Getting Garage Trains Lifted 

... had been considering various layout lifting ideas for his garage modules.  L:





I'm not sure what he decided on ...

... but he may still be on the look out for ideas ?  :mex:



I did a heavy window-blind lifting project, where I used to live.



The pulleys & fixings, came from the local 'Yacht Chandlers' ...  L:

... who had a wide choice of different types available.



:)



Si.

 



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 Posted: Fri Aug 16th, 2019 11:58 pm
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W C Greene
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Might I suggest, since you want a 2 by 6 module,
why not build it on a section of blue or pink 2" Styrofoam?
That way it would be very light, compared to "traditional wood construction,
and instead of making the piece being hoisted to the ceiling,
it can be perhaps hung on the wall like a piece of artwork-which it could very well be.
If you hang it from above,
you would need probably 4 attachment points for the "ropes" to raise it up & down,
and a layout with ropes at each corner might be problematic.
However, this is just my "take" on the plan.
I subscribe to the "KISS"principle...keep it simple ****.
I have built a great many layouts and simple is best.

Take care....
Woodie




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 Posted: Sat Aug 17th, 2019 03:13 am
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Michael M
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Ran across this idea:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tereomp-Xgo

With it being built in a cabinet, the layout could be easily moved later on.





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 Posted: Sat Aug 17th, 2019 07:14 am
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corv8
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Another idea - this one was really built, not by me.

A layout 4 x 1.5 meters (~12 x 4.5 ft) that rested on a strong iron water pipe,
a short distance from the rear wall.
The tube was supported by strong wooden legs left and right.

When in operation, the layouts front stood on several legs at the front edge.
Otherwise, it was lifted in vertical position with the scenery against the wall
(Obviously, the tallest structure had to be less than the distance of the pipe from the wall).

With the underside camouflaged with a curtain or similar,
it was unobtrusive for a living room.

Layout was lifted by hand, no fancy arrangement,
and secured to the walls when in the "up" position.
I think there was some sort of counterbalance weight at the very rear. 

Personally, I would try to build everything in one piece,
as I always had problems with gaps between modules, lift bridges and similar,
as most construction materials "live" and cause derailments when alignment shifts.




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 Posted: Sun Aug 18th, 2019 02:32 am
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Tom Harbin
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Derek,

I would tend to agree with Woodie on this.
A lift mechanism gets complicated and heavy quickly.
I've seen photos of several for smallish layouts,
and they always employ some kind of a winch and counterweights.
Kind of bulky for a bedroom.
Plus they need some kind of a safety mechanism, latches or locks or poles,
something that keeps it from falling on your son's head in the middle of the night.

I have a layout, currently apart for rebuilding,
that is a 1" slab of pink foam with a second layer of 1/2" foam on about 80% of it.
It is roughly 3.5'x6.5', so slightly larger than your proposed layout.
The only support structure consists of 3 1"x2" pine boards glued on the bottom,
to secure it to a desk frame I use when the layout is in operation.
Even with a rather substantial amount of hydrocal for a rock cut,
the layout weighs less than 25 pounds.

If you either used a 2" foam board or even a 1" foam board,
with a foam core "valance" around the edges of the layout to add rigidity,
it would be easy to just remove it when needed,
or you could put two supports at the proper height above the bed,
to put it on when needed.
You could even build two leg sets of the proper height.
With a helper you could easily lift the layout and place on the support shelves or the legs.
Lightweight layouts have a lot of advantages when it comes to portability,
and foam board with foam scenery can make a very light layout.

Tom


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 Posted: Mon Aug 19th, 2019 12:23 am
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Ken C
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Derek

The 2011 issue of the On30 Annual.
has a construction article for a lifting section for a doorway.

May not be practical for your intended length?

I would go with Woodie's and Tom's suggestion's myself.




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 Posted: Mon Aug 19th, 2019 03:00 am
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Derek McGuckin
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Thank you for the ideas gentlemen.

I think the light weight approach makes the most sense.

It can always be changed in the future.


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 Posted: Mon Aug 19th, 2019 02:30 pm
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W C Greene
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Derek, call it the KISS approach.
Anything made complicated becomes a s##$wreck very soon.
My entire layout is made from 2" foam,
and I am glad that I figured it all out.
Easy and quick.
I have 3/16" Masonite facia around the layout,
it looks nice painted and gives a bit of "rigidity" to the pieces.

Carry on Sir...
Woodie




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