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corv8
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Some years ago I started to build a mine, loosely patterned after the decaying Kennecott Mine in Alaska.
 
Our club layout is a multi level affair, with a long single track line going over three main (sceniced) levels,
a intermediate level, an upper staging that also douples as a return loop, and a hidden staging yard,
by means of two helixes, and long gentle grades.

This all in a small room,
so any landscaping  and building construction is severely restricted.

One of the features of the layout are many small stations and sidings.
One of those initially planned was a small mine - actually only two tracks on the edge of the upper level,
with a small building over those tracks, that symbolized the end of a conveyor.

On the entrance to the staging yard, way down, we later built a stamp mill,
that receives loaded trains from the mine for processing.

I always had a soft spot for decrepit mine buildings, and had a Pola/AHM mine on my layout as a teenager.
My own layout still is far from scenery, and I am not sure if there will ever be space for a mine.
So had the idea to build a BIG mine building complex over the area where the little conveyor shack was located,
and up over the mainline and the upper staging yard.

We constructed a support structure over part of the yard,
and a solid wooden base in several steps, which fits into the back of my Mercedes sedan.
So I can lift out the base and take it home to work on it in the garage. 





For now, a few pictures.

The whole affair stood idle for a year, now I started to build buildings again,
this weekend a coal bunker, next project will be a boiler house.





Purchased a Blair Line Cash Mine kit and butchered it for parts.

As the mine will be seen only from three sides,
I have used the rear wall for the lower level structure.  





Last edited on Mon Oct 28th, 2019 11:12 pm by corv8

Ken C
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Gerold

Going to be an impressive structure when completed,

will be watching your progress photos as construction go's on.


corv8
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Ken, its maybe 70% ? finished by now... at least the main structure.

Will post more pics of my progress in 2017 in the next days. 

Reason I started this thread NOW is to keep me motivated to continue, 
have so many ideas, but it was sidelined as job, family, other projects, ate away my time!

Here the support for a second large building is in place, also the head frame behind the main structure.
It's (not yet) very detailed, as its barely visible, as the mine towers high over the layout.

 



The lower part for loading hoppers with the good stuff,
if I ever decide what is mined in the Forlorn Mountains.

The support frame is a separate part,
several structures are removable for transportation.





The new building in place...

Completely built from wood sheeting, Grandt windows,
and 400 grit sanding paper for the roof. 





corv8
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One more picture of the whole thing,
before the support for the loading structure was added.





Last week I have removed the blue "rock" at the right of the picture,
it will be replaced by this ore hopper: 





corv8
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Update...

Trial fit of bunker on mine. 

Miscalculated things so legs were too short.

Added 3 cm high concrete footings, looks even better now than the initial concept.





elminero67
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Looking good, that is a BIG mining operation!




corv8
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elminero67 wrote:
Looking good, that is a BIG mining operation!


I like when trains are dwarfed by industries and mountains!


corv8
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Bunker painted, and decorated with a sign... just in time for annual open house.





Steven B
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Holy Smokes!!!   This is cool. 

I too like to have trains made small,
and have industries be able to ship more than half a boxcar of stuff. 
At least in my HO days. 

Wow. 

Keep on.


Ken C
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Gerold

One mighty impressive structure to be proud of!

Need to keep busy on a mining diorama, I am working on in O scale.

Had to part with my first model in S scale years ago,
still have a few photos of it, so time to build a second one.


corv8
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Next project, a boiler house.

My idea is to build it as a structure covered with corrugated sheeting,
have found a company in Colorado who sells great looking stuff,
however it seems my package is stuck somewhere in transit.

Today a club member showed up with two 3D-printed negatives,
and a small box full of paper sheets, which he had pressed between those negatives.
He uses some sort of double tissue paper??

Have to investigate, but For now, I have some material to tinker with.

Still need ideas how a nice boiler house could look like ...
Have downloaded mine pics for years,
but still wait for the "This-is-it" moment.

Any pics or links are appreciated.


Ken C
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Gerold

From your write up idea's, in my "Round to it" cabinet,

I have an article from the May June 2002 Railroad Model Craftsman,

which had an article on the Belin Works Boiler house,

which may be the answer to your plan's.


It is a corrugated structure.


corv8
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Ken C wrote: 
From your write up idea's, in my "Round to it" cabinet,

I have an article from the May June 2002 Railroad Model Craftsman,

which had an article on the Belin Works Boiler house,

which may be the answer to your plan's.


It is a corrugated structure.


Ken, thanks... any chance you could scan the article? 

I have most Craftsman... of course, there is a gap 1996 - 2004.


oztrainz
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Hi Gerold,

First a couple of questions


Question 1 - What is the powerhouse providing?
Steam for a steam winch for the mine shaft?
Steam for air compressors to power underground rockdrills?
Steam to make electrical power?
Steam power for mineral processing after mining eg crushers?
All 4?

That set the size of the power house boilers.


Question 2 - What type of boiler do you want?
Grounded locomotive type?
Vertical boiler?
Cornish (single flue)?
Lancashire (dual flue)?


Ken and myself should be able to round up some examples,
photos or links to each type of boiler,
and some of the stuff on the end of the boiler that sucks the steam.


corv8
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John,

I have to admit I haven't (yet) a clear concept what this mine actually does.
The whole thing started as we had a unsightly area on the club layout,
with a diminutive mine building from the early stages of layout construction.

Some years ago another member started to build a stamp mill,
with several storage tracks on the lowest level (this is a multi level layout).

Being fascinated with mines forever,
I came up with the suggestion to build a mining complex on the top level.
Started first and later read literature on the subject...
as we have the stamp mill already, we need some sort of ore.
The ore train which will have to go from top to ground level as an extra,
will have to find his way between the scheduled trains!

Have downloaded plans of the Kennecott Mine in Alaska to gain some knowledge.
Very confusing, with all those buildings intermingled!

As the mine is situated somewhere in the Southwestern Desert,
it must be working independently of outside sources of energy,
the boiler house has to produce all energy.
So question one, answer is all 4.

Re boilers,
I think the rectangular industrial boilers available in resin and 3D should be suitable.
I guess thay are Lancashire boilers?
However, not sure if it is worth the effort to add interior to the boiler house,
as it will be above eye level and one would have to climb on a stair to look inside.
There will be an track to boilerhouse level, to supply coal or oil and machinery parts. 

I have found that most western mines had wood construction boilerhouses
(wonder how many burned?) and as the complex already has plenty of wooden buildings,
I would like to have something else for variety.
A boilerhouse would make sense, a earlier one may have been replaced after an disaster.

Here in this forum there are several pics of structures covered with (worn and rusty)
corrugated sheeting which look fascinating, however mostly these are small sheds.

What I also want to include, those tall steel smokestacks common in US mining,
here in Europe, we had mostly one big brick stack.

Hope this helps to give you an idea of my plans.

Thanks for your help !


Ken C
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Gerold

To keep you busy.
 
There is a wealth of photo's & plans (100+) for the Kennecott Mine,
on the "Historical American Building Survey" site,
enter Kennecott Mine Alaska in the search.

The first site which comes up has 8 pages of photo's and plans,
for both the powerhouse and mill,
lots of interior and exterior photos and plans of both.

The plans for the boiler's show they are considered to be O type water tube,
they were coal fired, operated a few of this style, along with A's and D's in my time,
although not coal fired.

The power plant, restored by the NPS, is a massive! structure,
the Berlin Boiler House would not do the mill justice!, way to small.

This should keep you busy for a while, just going through the information.

:bg:  :bg:


corv8
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Ken
 
Have been at this site already + have downloaded general plans,
trying to understand the "flow" of the ore through the structure.

Might simply use the (downsized) powerhouse concept,
with corrugated sheeting, instead of wood construction.

However, hadn't realized that there are pics of other mines too...
There ARE corrugated boiler houses.  Will study.

Thanks!


oztrainz
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Hi Gerold,

The powerhouse at Corrimal was all corrugated iron covered.
It's the big building with the stack behind elevated gantry in the background, 
in the photo labelled Corrimal Bagownie Pit Top.

This had 3 Cornish boilers and one locomotive type boiler under that roof.
like these three.

For an idea of size, have a look at the pencilled in dimensions.
This link shows that there was more under the roof than just the boilers.

If you are after a way to make electricity from steam without going to turbines,
have a look at a triple expansion steam engine.


  


And generator attached to it.





At Zeehan, this provided electrical power for a silver/lead/zinc mine and the town. 
The main switchboard is in the background. 

Also from Zeehan in Tasmania is this model of a non-ferrous mineral processing plant.
This uses gravity to move stuff to the next part of the extraction process.





The lower end of the stamp mill is at top left.

I hope that this might give you some idea,
of what might be under the roof of the mine from next to the shaft. 
 

Ken C
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Gerold

Closest I could come up with,
for a elevation of the Boilers used at the Kennecott Mine, based on the plans.

Looking at the flow sheet for the mill (circa 1938) and equipment listing,
not sure how long it would take to install an interior,
even if kit's were available for the equipment.



John

Along with the Museum in Zeehan,
my other place to visit is the Tin Mine Museum in Darby,
never have managed to make it down to the hydro plant at Waratah (weather).
Did tour the Lake Margaret Hydro plant.

Which remind's me I have to order Ross Mainwarring's new book,
on the Mt Lyell mine and mill.


corv8
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Did some reading on the "Historical American Building Survey" site,
and found some more views of the Kennecott power house I previously have overlooked.
Looks rather busy with the different rooflines.

Maybe I simple adapt the design and cover it with tin sheeting.
It might be an older structure upgraded some time?
Or, I might model it when workers are just halfway in the progress of rebuilding it?


The triple expansion engine looks most fascinating,
wonder if ship modelers have a suitable model available.

This thing is large enough it might be visible,
even when the boiler house is in a raised position.


corv8
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Took some pics of my homemade corrugated sheeting. 





From left, the 3D-printed "two masters" or negatives.

Then a panel as it looks after painting.

Next, after it has been cut to shape.

Finally, with some weathering and a (rust?) hole torn into it.





Last panel close up.


corv8
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Today made up my mind to build a cardboard mockup for the powerhouse.

Glad I did!

First version was way too large,
Cut it down proportionally two times, still doubt if it's right. 

Think I will visit the club layout tomorrow and place it in the place that is earmarked...

Anyway, I am quite happy...
It's a compressed version of the Kennecott power house in Alaska. 

I plan to build a wood sheeted house that is in process of re-sheeting with corrugated tin sheets.
Or that has been partially rebuilt years ago, so I may use rusty and dented tin sheet. 










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Gerold

Going to be one impressive building,
hopefully it will fit into the available space for the mill.

Looking forward to progress from mock up to finished building.


corv8
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Ken,

Have just finished cutting the wood panels,
had access to a pro wood shop today.

But will check on the layout first before I will start gluing.
In the worst case, have to cut them smaller again.

Next task will be to cut openings for the MANY windows...
They may be oversize as this is only the inner shell, that will give this thing stability.

Think about a circular saw...
No idea how to make countless rectangular holes in reasonable time?


corv8
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Back from club layout...

This thing is too large.

Tomorrow will downsize the panels I have already cut.


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Gerold

Shame you need to downsize yet again,
it was looking an excellent representation of the prototype.

Better though to find out before hand,
then after it was built.


corv8
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Next try....

Maybe 20% smaller in all relations.
Should have placed loco to it... it's still NOT a small building.

The previous version would have stood too tall beside the main structure.
I feel the power house has to be smaller than the main building. 





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Gerold

Looking good.

As a side note, after yet another tour of photos and plans,
the left hand section housed 4 oil fired boilers.
 
Taller right hand section housed (1930s addition?) 2 Allis-Chalmers oil engines,
roughly 40-50 feet in height, yes they were monsters.

The annex likely housed the other equipment necessary for the operation of the plant,
water treatment etc.

I have yet to come across any signs of fuel oil tanks for oil supply,
they had to be somewhere on the site!


corv8
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Four tall stacks with cross-bracing and span wires are an absolute necessity.
Hope the lh section isn't too short to look good with them.

I think an detailed interior isn't worth the effort,
as the power house is located high above the layout.

But I could place an old steam loco beside it,
for emergency steam supply when a boiler is in need of repair.


Ken C
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Gerold

Having spent to many years working in power plant's,
wanting to detail the interior is not on my list either.

I will admit I am slowly working on the interior equipment for a Hydro-Oil Engine plant,
but it is a far cry as to what would be found in a steam plant.

I would suggest adding some piping visible through the window's, maybe the odd tank or vessel,
if you plan on interior lighting, no need to go overboard with lighting.

At the time steam piping would be insulated with asbestos,
and wrapped with painted canvas, usually grey.


corv8
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This evening have cut holes in the walls with a circular saw.

Then milled them to a rectangular shape,
with a cutter intended for steel cutting held in my large trusty drill press.

Looks really awful but will be covered then anyway.


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" This evening have cut holes in the walls with a circular saw "


Hi Gerold  :wave:


I may have just answered my question  ???  whilst Posting !  L:


To me, a 'circular-saw' is a machine with a large eg. 8" 'circular' blade ...

... I was thinking, how on earth ... ?


But I guess you used what I know as a 'hole-saw' ...  ???

... like maybe a 1/2" dia. cutter, with a 1/4" drill-bit in the middle, on a mandrel ?  L:





The woodwork ^^ is lookin' ACE !  :thumb:


:java::moose: :dt:


Si.


corv8
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Si. wrote: 
But I guess you used what I know as a 'hole-saw' ...  ???

... like maybe a 1/2" dia. cutter, with a 1/4" drill-bit in the middle, on a mandrel ?  L:


The woodwork ^^ is lookin' ACE !  :thumb:


Si,

Yes, a hole saw.

To be honest, I don't even know exactly how this thing is named in German...  Lochsäge? 

Unfortunately, the downsized wooden model has been abandoned again....
When placed at the layout, it looked very wrong and out of proportion....  

Will start again with a blank sheet.


corv8
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Stage III !

Went to club layout, full of frustration.

Attacked the mockup with a Saber saw...
Cut 2 cm from the bottom, removed the front part,
but stretched the left part that is supposed to hold the four boilers. 

Between actions, always placed it on the layout to check optics. 
I am rather happy with it now.











Now for the actual structure.... 

But, while tinkering with mockups, windows and corrugated sheeting have arrived.

So nothing may stop me now! 


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Gerold

Still an impressive structure in it's own right!

:glad: :glad: :glad:


corv8
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Added four stacks with Photoshop... 





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" Lochsäge ? "


Hi Gerold  :wave:



I thought those were the special shorts, for wearing whilst drinking beer.  [toast]

;)


Your descriptions are 5***** BTW Gerold ...  :thumb:

... typically VERY late at night/morning for me probably ...
... I was probably considering Quantum Physics & square-holes !  :brill:



I once co-organized the transportation, of a full Austrian brass bands instruments ...

... to arrive synchronized with (loads of) them, for a boat cruise on the River Thames !  :shocked:


LHR airport customs ...  :dope:

" No officer, they are a traditional Austrian brass band, they don't smoke crack ...

... I've no idea what all the white stuff on the tuba is, 'Brasso'(TM) perhaps ? "

:time:

Last part of the journey from LHR airport customs, to Central London was the most fun ...

... in a Bedford Luton full of brass, the apex-speeds would have impressed Niki Lauda !


:mex:


Si.

 

corv8
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Third edition.... 

Changed concept, didn't use a solid wood construction,
to avoid to have to cut a myriad of window openings... 

Left some pieces with no or only few windows,
but otherwise built a frame which will cover with cardboard,
and then wood siding or, mostly corrugated sheets. 











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