Freerails Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Traction & Electrified Railroads > South Shore '700' Class Motors - 1:87 Scale

Freerails IS ACCEPTING new Members ... To join Freerails ... See how to Register as a Member in the 'Joining Freerails' Forum

South Shore '700' Class Motors - 1:87 Scale
 Moderated by: . Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Fri Apr 3rd, 2020 11:13 am
  PMQuoteReply
1st Post
corv8
Registered
 

Joined: Tue Nov 13th, 2018
Location: Vienna, Austria
Posts: 283
Status: 
Offline
 
As circumstances  force me to stay indoors,
I pull out one abandoned project after the other.

Have accumulated motors, parts and info over many years,
so I don't need to purchase anything other than decoders.

Years ago I bought two Nickel Plate Products CSS&SB 700 Class boxcabs,
one in Germany, one in the USA.

Both painted green instead of orange, both lettered wrong.





Now I disassembled them first time.

First, my horrified eyes noticed the cubic shaped KTM motor,
that will smoke up any decoder after a few minutes.

Then, to my great joy,
these models don't have the usual pesky tower drives,
that are noisy and failure prone.

 


Removed both motors and looked in my motor box for two identical can motors. 
Found two used ROCO motors.... they are plentiful at eBay.de,
as many modelers replace them with Faulhabers. 

They fit nicely on the flat floor without any modifications,
and I cobbled together drive shafts, from existing components and silicone tubing.

Unpleasant surprise came when I hooked up jumper wires,
and one drive was frozen completely. 

After much cursing,
I found that some intermediate gears were stuck on their shafts,
similar as with the Fairfield trolley a few days ago. 

One truck came loose,
with gently working the drive shaft in both directions and plenty of oil,
the other truck had one little gear that wouldn't turn free,
after 30 minutes of lubing and all sorts of tricks.

Finally I was at the point that I could turn the wheels a full revolution,
without excessible force (that might break something),
so I hooked a small drill to the input shaft,
and powered up the assembly at the minimal torque setting.

When I felt the gears began to turn with little resistance,
I installed the truck in its place again and hooked up the shaft,
then had it running on ~ 10 V DC for some time, in both directions.





Next I will put in a decoder and check the speed range.
I have learned there  are "slow" and "fast" Roco motors.

So I have to find out if the speed is in a range,
that makes it possible to adjust its settings to match my other freight locos. 




____________________
Gerold
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Apr 3rd, 2020 11:46 am
  PMQuoteReply
2nd Post
2foot6
Registered


Joined: Sun Oct 20th, 2013
Location: Near Melbourne Victoria, Australia
Posts: 511
Status: 
Online
 
A nice project for you corv8.

Seems to be working out for you.


I'm interested in what you are doing,

please keep posting pics with the report.


....Peter.




____________________
I aspire to inspire before I expire.
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Apr 3rd, 2020 08:30 pm
  PMQuoteReply
3rd Post
corv8
Registered
 

Joined: Tue Nov 13th, 2018
Location: Vienna, Austria
Posts: 283
Status: 
Offline
 
One of those motors is running ok now.

Wired the cheapest Lenz decoder to it, it provides all I need,
no fancy features but reliable and easy to program with my hand held controller. 

Decoder "flies" in the air, no good place on the floor,
and I avoid to put it on the motor, to prevent it to be affected by the heat. 





Added nickel silver pickups to four of the insulated wheels,
so she will pass from one block to the next without skidding to a stop.

My standard procedure for all kind of locos,
with the traditional way of picking up current, one side by each truck respectively,
is to glue a piece of polystyrene to the bottom of the truck,
form suitable pickup wires from 0.5 mm nickel silver wire,
and then melt it in the polystyrene.

Looks crude and ugly but works better than gluing,
alternative would be to use circuit board and solder the wires to this.

For me styrene works ok.

Then I route a wire from the pickup wire to the other truck,
and simply connect it with the soldering eye. 







____________________
Gerold
Back To Top

 Posted: Sat Apr 4th, 2020 08:51 am
  PMQuoteReply
4th Post
Kitbash0n30
Registered


Joined: Mon Dec 10th, 2012
Location: Boonville, Missouri USA
Posts: 754
Status: 
Offline
 
Hey, nice locomotive rehab!

That's an idea on the pickup wire.


Looking at the bottom view of the truck,

and thinking that's quite a gear train in there!




____________________
See y'all later, Forrest.
Screw the rivets, I'm building for atmosphere
Back To Top

 Posted: Sat Apr 4th, 2020 05:30 pm
  PMQuoteReply
5th Post
pipopak
Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 13th, 2011
Location: Florida USA
Posts: 2015
Status: 
Offline
 
I would have made a gear cover and then put the wires the same way.

But I have been married long enough to learn that I am always wrong or wronger...

Jose, under house arrest...




____________________
Junk is something you throw away three weeks before you need it.
Back To Top

 Posted: Sat Apr 4th, 2020 09:28 pm
  PMQuoteReply
6th Post
Ken C
Registered


Joined: Tue Jun 16th, 2015
Location:  Calgary, Alberta Canada
Posts: 951
Status: 
Offline
 
Gerold


With your collection of electric's,

will we ever see a model of the "Swiss Electric-Steam" engine's.  :)


Inquiring minds would like to know.




____________________
Ken Clark
GWN

Kaslo & Slocan Railway
International Navigation & Trading Co
Kootenay Railway & Navigation Co.
Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Apr 5th, 2020 02:17 am
  PMQuoteReply
7th Post
corv8
Registered
 

Joined: Tue Nov 13th, 2018
Location: Vienna, Austria
Posts: 283
Status: 
Offline
Ken C wrote: 
With your collection of electric's,

will we ever see a model of the "Swiss Electric-Steam" engine's.  :)


Inquiring minds would like to know.


Ken, have to disappoint you in this case of this type ....

Switzerland is too far from my layout theme (West Coast).
 

Although I am known to allow Japanese electrics to show up from time to time.




____________________
Gerold
Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Apr 5th, 2020 10:12 pm
  PMQuoteReply
8th Post
corv8
Registered
 

Joined: Tue Nov 13th, 2018
Location: Vienna, Austria
Posts: 283
Status: 
Offline
 
Not much progress today....

Drilled out the headlights for LEDs, added wiring,
intended to put the shell on the frame.

Disaster looming.... 
With wiring harness and connector atop the motor, no way.

Had to move the decoder to one of the trucks (old trick from Athearn days),
now have to replace the wiring.

Anyway, looks good. 

Paint is ok for my eyes too.
New formula.







____________________
Gerold
Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Apr 5th, 2020 11:51 pm
  PMQuoteReply
9th Post
Traingeekboy
Registered


Joined: Sun Aug 28th, 2011
Location:  
Posts: 510
Status: 
Offline
 
More progress than me lately.

Love seeing these models.





____________________
Did I ever mention that I like trains?
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Apr 9th, 2020 06:25 am
  PMQuoteReply
10th Post
corv8
Registered
 

Joined: Tue Nov 13th, 2018
Location: Vienna, Austria
Posts: 283
Status: 
Offline
pipopak wrote:  
I would have made a gear cover and then put the wires the same way.

But I have been married long enough to learn that I am always wrong or wronger...


Jose

Why didn't you tell me a few days ago....
 
However, I am not the person who will operate this thing for hours,
she will spend most of her life in the display cabinet while I work on new projects.

So she wont pick up much dirt with those tiny gears.


Current state of affairs.... 

This is #703, an orphan shell I bought separately,
and which I have put on one of my drives. 





This is future #702....  The leftover shell from the drive that is now #703





And now, I did the evil deed....





Cut down the cab roof, to create one of the tow "prototype" locos,
which didn't get the raised cab of the "series" types. 

Those locos were old freight haulers from the NYC,
and were modernized by the South Shore in their Michigan City shops.

Apparently they found the low cabs a nuisance,
and built # 703 - 707 with raised cab roofs.


Did one cab yesterday evening,
if conversion goes well, will do the other too. 

Rather straightforward job, windows need to be enlarged,
new taller pantograph supports have to be fabricated.

Doors at sides of carbody were recessed on these two locos.


And then, I need a third drive.

Found that the trucks of a German E194 / Austrian 1020 Series,
have the same wheel spacing.

Maybe will butcher a Roco model, 
and cast sideframes from resin.




____________________
Gerold
Back To Top


 Current time is 11:49 pm
Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  

Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Traction & Electrified Railroads > South Shore '700' Class Motors - 1:87 Scale
Top



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems