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W C Greene
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OK boys & girls, here is something from the real way back machine...

This tiny HO scale/gauge 0-4-0 "Minnie" was built around 60 years ago by Mr. Bill Caldwell (Mudge, Muj). She's brass, scratchbuilt...and has a great old Lindsay motor. After all these years and many, many REAL miles, Minnie runs as nice or even nicer than anybody's fine HO loco. I can testify to this since I know how well modern HO locos run. She has a neat little 4 wheel tender and was inspired by Minnetonka, the beautiful old logging loco. I am sure that Muj can give us more information about this fine piece of historical machinery. Check out the front coupler, it's at least 50 years old...a KD MKD which predates the magnetic couplers. Thanks for the photo.

             Woodie

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woooow, 60 years and still running!! That´s an old locomotive!! LOL

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I remember, about 1949 Model Railroader had a photo and plan of the Minnetonka--I thought that it was a neat little lokie back then, and the pix of Mudge's model reminded me of the fact. Didn't have any idea at that time of how to build my own model, short of buying a Mantua Reading. 0-4-0, or Varney "Little Joe" (the dockside) for the mechanism, and not being in a position moneywise to do that, had to be content to scratch build cars for my Mantua "Busy Bee" (birthday gift) to pull.

Ah the good olde days!



Herb :old dude:

W C Greene
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OK kiddies, here's the newest from Mr Caldwell, aka Mudge, aka Muj. This one is built from parts that are older than most readers of this post. Muj used an ancient Lindsay motor and frame from a "Stubby", brass parts from Kemtron, Cal Scale, and PSC, and scratchbuilt parts to build this wonderful tiny HO gauge teakettle that he has named "Increpid". She runs very nicely as all old-tech locos should and can out crawl even the newest rtr stuff from green boxes.



The saddle tank and 4 wheel tender were made by Muj from sheet brass and all was soldered together, not wimpy epoxy stickum. The loco sits so low that the couplers (KD'S) had to be modified so she could couple up to some cars. This is quite an accomplishment for any model builder, much less one who is 87 years young! I just hope I can do half as well, much less be alive, when I am a senior citizen. If anyone needs "particulars", I am sure the builder will elaborate.

                               Woodie

Herb Kephart
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Way to go Mudge!! :glad::glad::glad:

Herbie :old dude:

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:thumb:

W C Greene
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Now then, here are a couple of shots of Bill's (AKA Mudge, Muj) new and old locos. #1 is his Minnie, built long ago in a galaxy far away, and #2 is the Increpid, brand new.





New #2 has lots of extras, hard to see is the bicycle hung on the saddle tank-just in case the loco craps out on the main! These two little lokies are real jewels built in a way that (outside of Mr Kephart) is not seen these days. Needless to say, they are HO scale/gauge and don't really look too out of place on the Mogollon Railway's twisty rails. That reefer behind #2 is the real thing..the car is made of printed cardstock, the handrails and door hinges, etc. are all printed, no wire bendings. I believe the car is probably 50 something years old with Central Valley trucks and originally had Baker couplers (who remembers them?). And now, I will "drop" the name of the builder-Mr John Allen, builder of the Gorre & Daphetid and a model railroading folk hero and legend. Mr Allen and Muj knew each other and drank plenty of coffee together in Dallas when Allen visited Mrs Hall's hobby shop and all the usual suspects gathered for some chat. Another gent who hung out there was Mr Bill McClannahan, author of the first scenery manual and master of model railroading.  BTW-this writer got to see Mr McC's layout when he was a kid, it was the first train layout he had ever seen with scenery!

As Edith & Archie sing-"Those were the days!"....

                                       Woodie

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He finally got #2 "finished".  Looks good on the Mogollon.  I find it amazing that he can do that well with the arthritis in his hands.  It's an inspiration to us all.

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:moose::moose::moose::moose::moose: some how i missed this amazing simply amazing:old dude:

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Dont know which is cooler, the models or the story behind them. Thanks for sharing and inspiring!

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Those are stunning.... I'm always amazed when I see hand built brass locomotives. Where do people learn those skills?

Mike

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Mike-the skills to build brass locos is really a lost art. If you look back in ancient Model Railroader (long before it became a rich dude's RTR rag), there were guys showing how to build brass locos using files, a jeweler's saw, a Yankee drill, and some screwdrivers...the soldering irons needed kilns to get heated. Back then, if you needed a cross compound Westinghouse air pump (PSC and everybody else makes castings now), you either made it from 35 bits of brass or you did without! Skills like those needed were learned from years of learning to make things by yourself. Herb Kephart is an example of such a modeler, his work is top rate and he makes everything (except the motors) himself. Yes, wheels, gears, everything. I stand in awe of those skills, very very few posess them now. Muj is of that lost generation, he has forgotten more than we will ever know.
Where does one learn? I suppose the info can be found on the net today, practice makes perfect and be prepared to make mistakes...many of them. There are some guys who still walk the old paths, one young dude is Jeff Bisonette, he builds HOn2(not erzatz HOn30 wannabees using N gauge mechs.) locos from brass, and he has made a couple of HOn18 locos. The mind reels at such stuff.
I don't know if I can really answer your question, the techniques are part of a bygone era.

Woodie

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I suppose it's the old saying "Where there's a will, there's a way". I imagine those guys wanted those models bad enough that they worked at it until they acquired the skills to make them all on their own. I've never worked with metal much so I always find that kind of work a bit of a mystery and a marvel. Thanks for the post.... even if it is an older one. I really enjoy the photos.

Mike

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 Mike,

   I can attest to what Woodie is saying that the masters we all admire , every one he named in that post and a lot more that were around in the early days of Model Railroading had skills and peserverance that staggers the imagination, considering how little they had to work with compared to now, and IF you can find any thing any of them have written to help one learn, do so.

    I can also say that unless you are an absolute uncooridnated klutz that building in brass is possible with a bit of determination.

     I learned how and IF I CAN most ANYONE can. Prior to building my first Brass Locomotive at the age of almost 50 my entire soldering education had been making a funnel in the 10 th grade , with one of those huge soldering coppers heated by a blow torch like Mel used. I had done a bit with a solder gun on some wires  as well, but that was about it.

  My introduction to the lure of Brass locos came when a Friend of mine bought a United Models Brass Climax, he only wanted it for display , but he wanted it to be hooked up to some log cars he had and there were no couplers on it.  He asked me if I could put some on , and left it with me while he went to California for a couple of weeks.

   I had never seen a brass engine -- mostly Mantuas, I had been building mostly model cars for years, only recently becoming interested in trains. I also had never seen a geared locomotive and was completel transfixed by how neat the little engine was.   I knew he had paid over 300 dollars for it  ( 1980's dollars)  but I wanted one myself and was not flush enough to even think about buying one-- So I shortly had the little loco in pieces on my bench  measuring  and bending and soldering , I got a gas jewelers type torch, ordered wheels from somewhere , can't remember now .

 I Spent a bunch of time on the phone with Cliff Grandt ,  ( another of the Giants of the past)  so he could help me design the transmissions for the 4 ( yes 4) locos I was building . The gearing used by United was not available as they had it special made, so Cliff Grandt helped me to utilize some of his parts to get the job done --all 4 ended up having a slightly different gear train because after one set was figured out , Cliff would say  --"OR we Could"------- so we did!

   This tells a LOT more about Cliff Grandt than it does me, I had never met the man, had not used any of his kits or parts, I just had seen his ads and knew he was providing gears and things to model railroaders. I called his company number and  Cliff himself was there and he very graciously helped me over several weeks! No wonder he is called a giant of the hobby!

Now to explain how it got to four --when my Friend came back and found his very expensive loco in a million pieces he about croaked -- I calmed him down by telling him I would make 2, one for each of us -- My youngest son heard that and wanted one too , thats three  , then I decided on 4 that way I would have one to sell because by now even building them myself was getting costly!   Never sold the extra!

   The point is that with nominal modeling skills which I am sure almost everyone on this forum has ,the things so many marvel at are within reach of all.

    Dave

Last edited on Tue Aug 28th, 2012 01:30 am by hicountryscratcher

Herb Kephart
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Interesting story Dave.

And I agree that most of the folks that say, or think to themselves, "I can't do that", could--if they get over the mental block.

I think that I did a piece on soldering way back here on FreeRails--but the two places that folks have problems when they try to solder are.

The objects have to be clean. This means--squeeky, scrubby, you can lick it, no germs clean. File, abrasive paper, Bright Boy abrasive block, CLEAN.

Second place where failure rears it's ugly head is- not enough heat. If the soldering "iron" will melt the solder readily, you have enough TEMPERATURE, but you still might not have enough HEAT (think BTU's) You have to have enough mass in the soldering iron that the heat is transferred almost instantly to the area to be soldered and the solder flows. This is the "secret" to putting one piece on a boiler without two adjacent ones falling off. You can't do much with a 25 watt iron, except solder small wires, A good choice for scratch building would be a 125 (or larger) watt iron.

Don't try soldering with a small torch, or a resistance rig, until you have mastered the use of an iron.

In model building, a torch is most useful for starting small workbench fires.

Herb 

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I've done a fair amount of electrical soldering in my days. I make my own battery packs for R/C airplanes so I've soldered lots of batteries together and lots of connectors and lots of wire splices. Some of it has been very high current stuff so it's not all tiny either. In fact, I'll bet most of my soldering isn't as fine as a lot of the soldering done on a brass locomotive. I can certainly agree with the need for having the proper temperature to melt the solder and the proper amount of heat stored in the tip to get a quick heat transfer. Too much heat left too long on a loco I'm sure does create problems with other parts falling off. That same thing(staying on the parts too long with the heat)can wreck electronics or melt wire insulation. So yes, to get a good quick heat transfer is key to making good soldering joints.... and having clean parts and a clean soldering tip are a big part of that.

I've always used a 40 watt and an 80 watt soldering iron for my work. I don't think anything more would be of any benefit but having the right size tip is huge. If the tip is too small it won't hold enough heat to get a proper transfer. Wipe the tip with a wet sponge prior to every joint soldered to make sure the tip is clean. I clean all my parts with alcohol first and I many times will sand them slightly too to give the solder something to hang on to. If you sand them wipe them clean with the alcohol again before soldering. If at all possible hold the parts perfectly still until the solder hardens. Any solder joint that isn't a bit shiny is a cold solder joint and will be subject to failure down the road.

If I were building brass locos I'd look at getting a resistance set from American Beauty. Take a look.

https://www.americanbeautytools.com/site/

I don't think I'll be building any brass models anytime soon but I certainly can appreciate the effort one puts into such a effort.

Mike

Last edited on Mon Aug 27th, 2012 06:00 pm by mwiz64

mwiz64
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Say, speaking of American Beauty... They have some nice how-to info about soldering right here.

https://www.americanbeautytools.com/site/bulletin

Mike

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Herb Kephart wrote: Interesting story Dave.

And I agree that most of the folks that say, or think to themselves, "I can't do that", could--if they get over the mental block.

I think that I did a piece on soldering way back here on FreeRails--but the two places that folks have problems when they try to solder are.

The objects have to be clean. This means--squeeky, scrubby, you can lick it, no germs clean. File, abrasive paper, Bright Boy abrasive block, CLEAN.

Second place where failure rears it's ugly head is- not enough heat. If the soldering "iron" will melt the solder readily, you have enough TEMPERATURE, but you still might not have enough HEAT (think BTU's) You have to have enough mass in the soldering iron that the heat is transferred almost instantly to the area to be soldered and the solder flows. This is the "secret" to putting one piece on a boiler without two adjacent ones falling off. You can't do much with a 25 watt iron, except solder small wires, A good choice for scratch building would be a 125 (or larger) watt iron.

Don't try soldering with a small torch, or a resistance rig, until you have mastered the use of an iron.

In model building, a torch is most useful for starting small workbench fires.

Herb 
Herb , I seldom disagree with anything you say , and knowing the caliber of your work, am somewhat hesitant to do so now.   However, I find a torch , I use a Blazer Gb2001, to be invaulable in building with  brass or other solderable metals.  It provides instant heat where and when you want it. It makes it easy to attach small parts to , say , a Boiler . The secret, if you will ,is to "tin" the part to be attached so it has solder already at the scene,  so as soon as the heat make a liquid of the solder , it's time to remove the heat -- NOW!! -- I find it helpful in fussy details to use a spray bottle with water to aid in instant cooling.    I also have an assortment of solders with different melting temps , start with the highest , add more parts with lower ones.  As far as clean goes , you are 100% there but beyond that use a GOOD flux, none of this fluxcore solder stuff, get some good acid flux-- the acid flux sold by Sta-Bright is the best I have found , their solder is also one of the ones I like . If it can stll be found there was a flux called SalMet  that I got some of years ago , not sure who sold it --Kemtron?? . Probably Sta-Brite is the best you will find , try to get the BIG 4 oz bottle,  the tiny bit that comes wqith Sta-Brite solder will be gone long before the solder. http://www.blazerproducts.com/tools/http://www.harrisproductsgroup.com/  Dave , I have no connection with Harris products, honest  , HARRIS

Last edited on Mon Aug 27th, 2012 07:32 pm by hicountryscratcher

hicountryscratcher
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mwiz64 wrote: Say, speaking of American Beauty... They have some nice how-to info about soldering right here.

https://www.americanbeautytools.com/site/bulletin

Mike


 Mike a lot of folks swear by resistance soldering , I have tried it and completely abandoned it. I confess I never tried a commercial product like American Beauty the 500 .00 dollar and up price kept my hands in my pocket. A couple of the model mags. had articles on building your own rig-- I did build one according to the article --worked fine BUT was much too low a wattage to do much. Now that I had the basics down I searched around and found a transformer that would produce about 250 watts , got that built --still could do much better with my little blazer Soo-  :us:    ----- I regressed back to the stone age sitting around the fire making sure it did not go out!

 

  Dave

Last edited on Mon Aug 27th, 2012 07:32 pm by hicountryscratcher

W C Greene
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With all that being said (or written), yes...I can do nice soldering BUT these days, I build from styrene. My soldering is just to connect wires to r/c boards and Li Po batteries...and I forgot, I assembled Muj's little HOn3 Kemtron 0-4-0 Teakettle a while back. A nice "refresher" course. I still make loco cabs, etc. from brass but I ain't building the whole thing from scratch any more(except for all freight cars, structures, track...awww geez)

Woodrow

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Just a simple American Beauty soldering iron is a lot nicer to work with than a cheap Weller iron from the local hardware store. I've never resistance soldered either and I probably won't. I don't solder enough for that kind of expense.

Mike

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W C Greene wrote: With all that being said (or written), yes...I can do nice soldering BUT these days, I build from styrene. My soldering is just to connect wires to r/c boards and Li Po batteries...and I forgot, I assembled Muj's little HOn3 Kemtron 0-4-0 Teakettle a while back. A nice "refresher" course. I still make loco cabs, etc. from brass but I ain't building the whole thing from scratch any more(except for all freight cars, structures, track...awww geez)

Woodrow


 HMMMM? He signed Woodrow does that mean I have been put on notice  for being argumentive ?

    Well I have been accused of THAT before and I'm NOT  !! --I Tell You I'M not , I'M Not ---- errrr --ahhhh ummmm errr I mean  aaaahhh.  Ohhh! I see now :bang:

 

  Dave

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If I want to put someone on notice or make a "serious" point, I will sign the note with W C Greene. That means watch out!

Boudreaux aka Woodrow aka not late for supper, etc...

hicountryscratcher
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W C Greene wrote: If I want to put someone on notice or make a "serious" point, I will sign the note with W C Greene. That means watch out!

Boudreaux aka Woodrow aka not late for supper, etc...


 What we need is a passing out ----going plop on the ground smilie , thats what I wanted to prove my point about not being argumentative.:us:

 

Dave

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W C Greene wrote: With all that being said (or written), yes...I can do nice soldering BUT these days, I build from styrene. My soldering is just to connect wires to r/c boards and Li Po batteries...and I forgot, I assembled Muj's little HOn3 Kemtron 0-4-0 Teakettle a while back. A nice "refresher" course. I still make loco cabs, etc. from brass but I ain't building the whole thing from scratch any more(except for all freight cars, structures, track...awww geez)

Woodrow


 On a more serious vein , I wish I had the success with streyne that so many of you have had -- possibly thats because I have NOT done enough of it. To take flat, sterile styrene and turn it into a scratch built  mansion or store front, or engine , rolling stock etc.  is amazing to see.

   Dave

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Dave-

Thank you for making my head get larger.

Please note that I said--

Don't try soldering with a small torch, or a resistance rig, until you have mastered the use of an iron.

I agree with pre-tinning as a very useful way of attaching parts, particularly in that it uses a minimum of solder--and that means less cleanup of the pieces afterwards.

I built a resistance rig with an industrial transformer, and while it will get some pretty big pieces hot pronto, I find that I don't use it much. And a torch I do use for silver soldering--but that's a whole 'nother subject.

As to types of solder--I only use two. For places where you want the solder to flow, I used to use 70/30 (70% tin / 30% lead, but now use 95/5 (95% tin / 5% silver). NOT because of the lead Nazis, but because it is a lot stronger. Takes a little higher temperature, and doesn't flow quite as readily as 70/30--but it's a good trade off.

The other stuff that I use occasionally is 40/60 lead / tin. Good for making fillets around domes and stacks as it has a long period where it stays "pasty"

And I'm with you 100% on liquid flux--which is zinc chloride.

I didn't want to write a whole thesis on soldering last night, and that is why I didn't get into types of solder and flux.

When all is said and done, it's the results that count, not how you get there. Your results show that you have the process down pat.

I have mentioned several times that my father was a "tin nocker" his whole life, making anything that came along out of sheet metal. We even have a set of reindeer and a sleigh that he made as a Christmas ornament, to put on the mantle. He had me breathing in flux fumes from the time I was about 6, soldering up radiator covers, metal awnings and the like--talk about the third world and child labor--but i learned a lot from the old coot.

He even told me that his mother soldered when he was a kid --he was born in 1886. She would patch leaks in her tin coated steel items, wash tubs was one thing that he mentioned specifically. She did this with a poker, a pewter (AKA tin) spoon, and lump rosin for flux. Guess it's in the genes.

Thanks for your comments. Never hesitate to disagree, correct, or add to anything that I post.

I have ways of dealing with that--

Just kidding!!

Herb 

PS-- You mentioned Sal Met, from Kemtron. That was promoted as a flux for soldering Zamac. Worked with some Zamac's, not with others

Last edited on Tue Aug 28th, 2012 01:10 am by Herb Kephart

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Speaking of soldering. I have a few irons and a couple of torches, including one for doing jewlery, The Little Torch from Smith Equip.

I learned at any earlier age to solder. My Dad taught me. I also have soldered about 2 dozen or so HeathKits. Remember those?

Just recently I bult myself a resistance soldering rig using a microwave oven transformer. It'll melt 1/8" stainless steel rods.

I kind of wish I have built one of these earlier. That coal conveyoe for my rotary dumper was built using the resistance soldering rig.

Ok, I've bragged enough.

Bernd

Last edited on Tue Aug 28th, 2012 02:10 am by Bernd

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Bernd wrote: Speaking of soldering. I have a few irons and a couple of torches, including one for doing jewlery, The Little Torch from Smith Equip.

I learned at any earlier age to solder. My Dad taught me. I also have soldered about 2 dozen or so HeathKits. Remember those?

Just recently I bult myself a resistance soldering rig using a microwave oven transformer. It'll melt 1/8" stainless steel rods.

I kind of wish I have built one of these earlier. That coal conveyoe for my rotary dumper was built using the resistance soldering rig.

Ok, I've bragged enough.

Bernd
  OH NO YOU DON'T Bernd,   Don't even think about sneaking off after dropping a bomb like a microwave oven transformer  being good for a soldering rig!!  The transformer I got to try my 250 watt or so rig cost about 50 bucks and still was too weak to really do the job, I was trying to use it to solder a loco frame and it would not do it . Now microwaves are almost a giveaway item very often so fill us in on HOW! :!:   Dave

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 Herb,

       Make Bernd come back , he just took his ball and glove and went home! :shocked:

  Dave

Last edited on Tue Aug 28th, 2012 02:51 am by hicountryscratcher

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Dave,

I'm back. I just took my glove home and realized it wasn't my ball.

hicountryscratcher wrote:
 Herb,

       Make Bernd come back , he just took his ball and glove and went home! :shocked:

  Dave

(_!_):P:P

I'll post a bit about this later. If i can I'll take a picture of it melting a piece of stainless. If I remmebr right I got close to 450amps on full power. I'm using a variable voltage transformer to very the voltage going to the microwave transformer. At the high setting things get hot in a hurry.

Bernd

P.S. I didn't want to "thread hi-jack".

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I know Muj and if you ask about hijacking his thread, he'd say "what thread?"...Go on, just don't holler at your buddy Jack while at the airport...."Hi Jack!"

Woodie

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Bernd-

Don't lose that glove--might prevent burns, even if it is clumsy to wear while soldering!

Yeah--we sure have hijacked Muj's thread--but he is a fine person, and I think that he realizes that hijacking is a way of life here.

When (NOT IF) you write up your resistance rig, post it into the "Aids to Modeling" department. It is less likely to get lost there, and sounds like it will be a very valuable reference.

Herb 

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Herb,

Done. There's a thread in Aids to Modeling.

Bernd

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Are ya'll interested in more of Muj's treasures from way back? If so, I will take some photos & post them here.

Woodie

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I vote "yes" more pics.

Bernd

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I'll vote yes too.

'tis wonderful stuff, wish I had half his skills

Tom

Sullivan
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Si! More pictures.

Herb Kephart
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ASPOLUTELY!


Herb 

W C Greene
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OK then. More to come...

Woodie

W C Greene
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Here are a couple of shots of Muj's GREAT WESTERN HO scale "Brass Betsy" from the late 1940's and early 50's. This 2-8-0 is all brass (duh!) and powered with a Lindsay motor which is seen at the rear of the cab. This one is a regular runner and Muj has another still in the box-to be completed.







The tender trucks are slightly less old Mantua, the original Central Valley FOX trucks decomposed due to Zamack death. #7 still runs nicely and has several hundred thousand miles on the chassis. As far as I know, there are no small consolidations in HO available now, at least old time types like this one. By the way, the boiler is solid brass!

Now, something different:




Muj's Texas & Tehuacana (Taw-wackony) caboose #327. This looks to be an ancient Silver Streak kit with equally ancient Central Valley FOX leaf spring trucks. The lettering? Muj HAND LETTERED this car and the logo and number with paint and brush! Whatta concept, today's modelers don't have a clue about such work. No, she ain't a locomotive but ancient cars will be shown here also. These photos are taken on Muj's HO/HOn3 layout which has the same track plan as the original Gorre & Daphetid built by another master long ago.

There are many more treasures to display in both HO and HOn3. Hope you like this so far.

Woodie

Bernd
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The locomotive = :glad: :glad: :glad: :glad: :glad: :glad: 

The caboose = :rah: :rah: :rah: :rah: :rah: :rah:

 

:rah::rah:MORE
:rah::rah: 

Bernd = :apl:

Last edited on Thu Aug 30th, 2012 11:28 pm by Bernd

hicountryscratcher
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  I second Bernd !!

   :glad::glad::glad::glad::glad::glad::glad::glad::glad:

:rah::rah::rah::rah::rah::rah::rah::rah::rah::rah:

:apl::apl::apl::apl::apl::apl:

   And raise him a :2t::2t::2t::2t:

   And a :bow::bow::bow::bow:

 

   Dave

Bernd
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I fold Dave. ;)

Bernd

W C Greene
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OK youse guys...here's MORE!!!




Back in the 1940's and 50's, Mantua offered kits that were brass with some Zamack thrown in for good measure. This "Belle of the Eighties" is one of them.  Muj had been working on this old girl so she kind of leans to the front but you get the idea of what USED to be available.  A nice "Pittman" motor powered this loco and she still runs like a top. Check out the equally old Central Valley leaf spring Fox trucks under the tender.




Now, here is the first commercially available imported brass HOn3 loco, the beautiful C&S 2-6-0. PFM showed this in their 1959 catalog and she has detail that would "pass muster" today. Muj paid $34.95 for her back in '59...the price is still on the box. (Muj has the boxes for all his locos)




After the 2-6-0, PFM imported this C&S 2-8-0, another beautiful HOn3 loco. The 2-6-0 shown above was repowered with a Sagami motor, but this one has the original Romford "Terrier" motor which gets hot enough to burn your fingers if you pick up the tender after a few laps around the layout! Both locos run as you would expect, fine Japanese watches. Also note that Muj has KD HO couplers on these, back then there were no HOn3 couplers available. By the way, this loco was $39.95...probably due to the extra set of drivers and extra air tank!




A few years ago, Muj bought this Kemtron "Teakettle" kit on fleabay, he had been looking for one since dinosaurs roamed the Earth. It was fun to assemble, I know because I brushed up on my soldering to do it.  This loco has a Lindsay motor filling the cab, I installed pickups on all the wheels so she runs great and doesn't stall on dirty track. The only change was to use PSC HOn3 C-16 tender trucks just because I wanted to.




Another car now. This is a PFM HOn3 "D&RGW" brass caboose. A very sturdy hack indeed. The car was shown in the same 1959 catalog as the C&S 2-6-0. Price on the box-$6.95. You can't even buy a pair of HOn3 trucks for 7 bucks now!

More to come, I gaw ran tee...

Woodie

W C Greene
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Un mas, por favor...Another one, but not the end to say the least!




This has been shown in another thread but it is so nice, it belongs here also. Muj found this ancient Ken Kidder McKeen car. The price on the box is $25. I believe that Muj must be holding his mouth right because when he bought it (recently), it ran nicely right out of the box! I ain't kidding, nor is Ken (Kidding). I can't believe that one of those thousand dollar modern brass copies could run any better! One thing Muj did is to get rid of a wimpy little "headlight" from the top and put this more prototypical barrel light on the front. Other than that, she's all stock. This model may not be 60 years old, but it is surely 50 plus!

mwiz64
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Those are very cool I've never seen models of that type of loco before.... Nor have I seen any pictures of the full scale inspiration for them. <edit> This thread was longer than I realized. I was referring to the 0-4-0 locos in the beginning... and apparently I've already commented in this thread. My memory must be on the blink today...

Last edited on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 02:38 pm by mwiz64

chasv
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:moose::moose::moose::moose::moose::moose::rah::glad:great models more pictures

Kitbash0n30
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Fun thread!


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