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Run Down And Poor Lumber Company
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'Gorre & Daphetid' - John Allen Layout REBUILT  :bg:




OK guys


Here's a question that might have been asked on this Forum before.
But lets dream for a few moments, going into the 'New Year'.

If you had the chance to own any legendary layout throughout history,
that have graced the covers or pages of,
'Model Railroader', 'The Narrow Gauge & Shortline Gazette',
'Garden Railways', 'Finescale Railroader' & 'Narrow Gauge Downunder' etc.

By any builder past or present, living or dead.
And have it built in any scale of your choice !
Which one would you choose ??



But here's the 'kick'.
You can only pick one !
So choose wisely !



Mine would be the late John Allens 'Gorre & Daphetid' railroad  in 'G' Scale !


Happy New Year everyone !
Let me hear your choices !


Ronnie D.  :cb:


Huw Griffiths
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I take it that Miniatur Wunderland is out of the question.

 
Joking aside,
this is one of those questions where, if you were to ask 100 modellers,
you'd be guaranteed to get at least 101 different answers.

Everyone would give a different answer,
and at least 1 would be certain to change their mind!

My guess is that a lot of people in the UK would think of Pendon Museum,
which (despite its name) is actually a large model railway,
built by a number of people to recreate the appearance of the English countryside between the wars.

I've always wanted to see it,
but never had the chance.

In fact, like a lot of people,
I've never had the chance to see any of the really "great" layouts.

Also, (being in my mid 40s) I only ever saw steam engines as museum pieces,
so, although Pendon is often seen as a British "gold standard",
it can't really get my vote.


Rightly or wrongly, I'll stick with Miniatur Wunderland.


pibull63
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OK, I'll chime in. 

If I could have any layout, it would be the San Juan Central, by Malcolm Furlow. 

AND.........HAPPY NEW YEAR!  :glad:


W C Greene
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OK, my "dream layout" sits in the back yard.
It's all I ever wanted, 2 foot gauge, funkiness, and no stinkin' wiring except for the lights.

If I want to see some John Allen, I will go into Muj's house and look at his HO/HOn3 layout,
built on the original Gorre & Daphetid track plan.
Muj even has one of Mr Allen's freight cars!

                   Woodrow


Run Down And Poor Lumber Company
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Woodie I knew this would be your answer !!!! (laughing).

Happy New Year !!

Ronnie D.:cb:

W C Greene
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OK, Ronnie...

Someone who really influenced me a long time ago was Mr. Lyle Spears,
A pioneer HO logging modeler, I don't think Mr Spears had a layout,
but rather a long "module" representing a logging camp and engine facilities.
When I saw his photos in MR back in the early 60's,
I thought the photos were of real stuff.
Mr Spears had wiggly track, weeds, junk, and funky equipment,
in a time when weathering was not an issue...there was hardly any being done.

His photos inspired me to do what I do..
so if there was a "dream layout" that got to me, it was his.

Later on, John Olsen built his wonderful Celio Lumber Co,
and Mescal Lines RR HOn3 layouts, another inspiration.
I got to meet John and talked with him quite a while.
He was/is a real gentleman and a great modeler.

Last I heard, John was still with Disney Co.
But Mr Spears has long since gone to run trains in the hereafter.

But what I said earlier still stands..
when I dream, I dream about Mogollon and the Bloated Goat.

                      Woodie

Herb Kephart
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Well, if you picked something too large, you would only get to enjoy it for a very short time,
before maintenance (or lack of it) would start to mess seriously with your enjoyment of it.

So for me, it would have to be something that was built well enough,
and not overwhelmingly large.

It would have to be believable, no John Allen 30 bridges per mile.
No Malcom Furlow improbable vertical scenery.

I think that Allen McCellands  "Virginian and Ohio" in S-scale,
would be the ideal semi-mainline layout.

Or a 1/48 version of the "Carabasset and Dead River" two footer, by Farey or Hyden
(never could keep which one was which in my head).


Herb  :old dude:


Run Down And Poor Lumber Company
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Herb,

Happy New Year !!!!

I would like the
Gorre and Daphetid,
but without all the bells and whistles that came with it.

Mainly the mountain scenery and bridges.
And all the other little funky scenes John Allen added.


Ronnie D.  :cb:


Bill Fornshell
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W C Greene wrote:

Someone who really influenced me a long time ago was Mr. Lyle Spears,
A pioneer HO logging modeler, I don't think Mr Spears had a layout,
but rather a long "module" representing a logging camp and engine facilities.
When I saw his photos in MR back in the early 60's,
I thought the photos were of real stuff.
Mr Spears had wiggly track, weeds, junk, and funky equipment,
in a time when weathering was not an issue...there was hardly any being done.
His photos inspired me to do what I do..
so if there was a "dream layout" that got to me, it was his.


Woodie,

Lyle Spears is still alive and well.

I talk to him about once a year and just now got off the phone,
from wishing him a Happy New Year and shooting the train bull for a while.

He lives in Olympia, Wash.
and I can give you his phone number if you would like to call and say hello.

Someone added a caption on a picture of something Lyle had made,
and listed him as passed away by mistake a few years ago.

I have a signed copy of his book of drawings called "Logs A' Rollin' ",
with a date of 1961 on the cover and a few other drawings he did later.
He still goes to a few of the Logging Theme Train Show on the Left Coast.

I have a copy of two magazine articles about his Logging Theme work.
One is from the MR, Dec 1963, "Western Logging Co.: a model paradise"
with Layout diagram and pictures.

The other article is from the MR, July 1966, "Structures for a logging camp"
this one has 6 drawings and pictures of both prototypes and model buildings.


Dwayne
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Hmmm... gotta say that I wouldn't want anyone's layout.

As good as some of them have been, none have ever caused me "layout envy".

The only layout I want is the one that I create.

That's just how I roll.  :P


W C Greene
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Wow-sorry to think Mr Spears was passed! Just what I heard. Bill, thanks for the offer of a phone number but I have so many phone numbers of guys to call, I will be calling them from the other world myself!

I really agree with DW, just wanted everyone to think I wasn't such a jackass...but my layout is still my dream layout above all others. Sorry Mr Allen, etc...

                             Woodie

Bill Fornshell
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W C Greene wrote:


.but my layout is still my dream layout above all others.

                             Woodie


Woodie,

Being able to capture the "Spirt" of your layout in one I build would make "My Dream Layout".

teetrix
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There is a layout that made me homesick... I would give something to be an 1/76 scaled teenager for a couple of hours, spending a hot lazy summer day by watching the trains at Arne Wharf by Chris Nevard:

http://www.nevardmedia5.fotopic.net/c112122_1.html

The layout is only 2x3 ft, built with a light and skilled hand. Every detail (and the layout is packed full of them) looks as it MUST be there.

Michael


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If I had to pick a "famous" layout it would be the V&O.  But the truth is that I am building my dream layout.  Its not too big to be a maintenance headache but it's large enough to allow hours of operating fun.  Oh, and it keeps me out of bars and strip clubs. :bg:

Last edited on Wed Jan 12th, 2011 01:58 pm by mopman

Run Down And Poor Lumber Company
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Mopman,

Smart Move !! those lap dances can get costly !!!!:) (laughing my butt off)!!! Spend your money on trains, You'll have something to show for it.:old dude:

 

Ronnie D.:cb:

W C Greene
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Ronnie-if you spend your money on lap dancers at certain places, you may indeed have something to remember. Can you say PEN-I-CILLIN?????

                               WCG

Run Down And Poor Lumber Company
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Woodie,

I was laughing so hard !!! I almost got choke !!!! on my "Breakfast Burrito ":mex:

Ronnie D.:glad:

W C Greene
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If Ronnie is through laughing, I will continue...yep..

Dream Layout...possibly modeling a real railroad that could actually be reasonably done in one's lifetime and space alloted. My "dream layout" would probably be the Monson Railroad in Maine. Two foot gauge, Two 0-4-4t lokies, a dozen or so old flats, several old boxcars, a funky snowplow and flanger, and the smallest RPO in the US running on 6 miles of twisty trackage. A slate hauler, this little road could be faithfully (pretty much) done even in 1:35 scale without a bunch of hassle. And I haven't mentioned the interchange with the B & A at Monson Junction and the outrageous slate quarry trackage at Monson Village. If you haven't heard of this, try Googling the line.

OK, that would classify as my dream layout.

                        Woodie

Ronnie-PEN-I-CILLIN!!!!! 

Herb Kephart
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Yes, the Monson could be modeled almost in it's entirety, be shortening the "main line"

But after the two, almost identical, engines, and cars, almost all slate, don't you think that you would start to yearn for something a little different- perhaps a railbus? or some boxcars? or - or-----

But then you wouldn't have the Monson anymore-- you would have a layout based on the Monson with some freelancing.

Isn't that what you have already Woodie? Not Monson based, certainly, but a layout based on a prototype situation?

Not that there is anything wrong with that-damn few would argue with what you have created- but it comes full circle back to what your first choice for the perfect layout was.

Just thinking--I know, dangerous for an old codger 

Herbacide  :old dude:

Sullivan
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Herb Kephart wrote: ...don't you think that you would start to yearn for something a little different- perhaps a railbus? or some boxcars? or - or-----



Oooh, yeah...the Monson. It was my early most favorite of the Maine 2-footers.

As to traffic on the Monson...sure, it was mostly slate but lots of variety there. There were slate shingles carried on flats but a lot of the slate was specialty stuff - bathtubs, sinks, electrical cabinets, and the like - that was crated up and shipped either on the flats or in boxcars (they had six, I think).

There was also considerable less than carload traffic bound for Monson proper and even some logging (I have pictures of cars loaded with what appears to be fence post type logs), and of course, the combination car for carrying passengers and express freight.

And remember, slate work requires loads of sand for finishing and coal for the boilers (until electricity replaced some of that). Equipment was brought in, not always by truck, too.

Yeah, pretty much what Woodie has going on now, except different!

Sullivan
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For me the Bridgton and Saco River 2-footer would be elegant...if I had a vacant Safeway or Walmart store and had just won the lottery.

Even then the 26 miles would have to be compressed...a good thing considering I really think folks would get bored fast running all that open rail, even through field and forested areas.

Still, I got the opportunity a few years ago to traverse the entire roadbed, all still there but used by 4-wheelers, and I have to say the variety of scenery made for a very enjoyable trip. BTW, we were in a Suburban for this.

I think it would be fun to do the running switch at the junction and the run around Hancock Pond. Bridgton would be a hoot to maneuver through since its stub ended. Then there's Harrison, another stub end, but more switching.

Ahhh, the fantasies of childhood never end...even for us old curmudgeons...

Last edited on Thu Jan 13th, 2011 06:09 pm by Sullivan

Herb Kephart
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James, been a while since I looked at the book- but you are right--there is more variety there than what I had posted.


Herbie  :old dude:

Sullivan
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Herb,

Hey...we's all friends here...

It's only because I have the entire lot of photos on my computer here at work and occasionally take a few minutes at lunch to refresh the old memory.

If you've never seen any of the shots inside the finishing sheds at the quarry you'd be in for a treat. All those saws and finishing tables really speak to the amount of work that went into getting that stuff ready for market.

I'll see about posting a couple here.

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Here are a few shots inside the finishing sheds of the Monson Slate Quarry...

 

W C Greene
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OK James-now you done it! Like letting that mongrel pooch look in the butcher shop window...SHOW ME MORE! MORE, I tell you!

                               Woodie

Herb Kephart
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Had to be a great place to work--dust in the air, and slippery slurry on the floor.

No holding out on us James--show us more!!



Herbie  :old dude:

Sullivan
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Those are all I have of the inside of the buildings. I wish I could find more. I have several that show the outside workings of the quarry, though.

I'll see about posting some here soon.

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I have to say Harry Brunk's Clear Creek layout inspired me more than any other single layout. I like his style, you can tell he like's researching the prototype but he's not 'married' to it when it comes to modeling. You can tell he has fun with it.

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A glorified diorama featuring the roundhouse at Phillips on the SR&RL. A picture of that caused me to build my first HOn30 railway inspired on by Frary and Hayden. Spent too much money (for me) on books and locomotive drawings (Two foot cylopedia drawings that is) and then realized it would have to be O scale to see what I was doing. Wish I had been able to get drawings for that roundhouse.

Well onward Viva el Vapor et Azucar

 

Cheers from the Heart of the Continent

Will

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I'll have to say I am, and always will be, a "Mcclellandite".  The V&O series in Craftsman came along at just the right time to shape my model railroad views forever.

That said, when I think of favorites, I think of an old coot down in Dallas.  Working in an obscure scale (I'm personally fond of obscure scales), he's done more with less and better than I've seen elswhere.  I really don't go much for modeling models but if I did.....

W C Greene
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Bob-the "old coot" in Dallas is now wishing that dream layout was located in FIJI or maybe HAWAII...
somewhere that ain't 10 degrees!

                   Woodrow


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Break out the wool long johns for the Gila Gals, Woodie. 

It ain't over yet!

I SAW MY SHADOW TODAY!!!


W C Greene
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Bob-think that's bad...
I saw Muj's shadow today!

YIKES!!!

             Woodie


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Actually, my dream layout right now, would be about 15 feet of test track.
 

I've found out I like re-powering, re-wiring, adding sound, adding lights, capacitors, etc to locomotives.

Far more than building scenery!


Now I just have to wait until the garage unfreezes so I can build my "dream test-track layout".

Right now all I have is three feet of track glued to a board.

:f:


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I guess that's what happens,

when an aircraft mechanic takes up model railroads.

:)


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Dwayne wrote:

Hmmm... gotta say that I wouldn't want anyone's layout.
As good as some of them have been, none have ever caused me "layout envy".
The only layout I want is the one that I create.
That's just how I roll. :P


Dwayne,

I couldn't have said it better...

I second a lot of thoughts expressed by those tipping their hats to some in the hobby who inspired them,
and I owe a debt of gratitude to many modelers who shaped my own work over the years.

But when I close my eyes,
it's my own layout in 'completed' form I see.


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Study english well

UNCLE BOB
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Y'all have convinced me. 

I like MY layout best, too!


Run Down And Poor Lumber Company
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Now that I've had time reflex on all the time, work, money,
and freezing my A--off !!!! to build my first home layout.

I'm going to take back my first choice of (John Allens layout),
and pickup my own R&P Lumber Company layout.

That I regret having to dismantle because we moved,
and I still miss till day.


Ronnie D.  :bang:


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That's a real nice scene, Ronnie.
I understand why you would miss it!

My previous layout was built in N, and I enjoyed it for 10 years.
I can still see every inch of it in my mind's eye.
I have decided my NEXT layout will be portable, so it can move if and when I do!



Run Down And Poor Lumber Company
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MinerFortyNiner,

Many Thanks !!!

I bust my rear end for 2 years straight, to get this layout done,
for the 23rd Narrow Gauge Convention held in Denver that year.

And I started with a empty building from the ground up.

And not to toot my own horn !!!
But I got more work done in 2 years,
where it would have taken most guys in this hobby 10 years to do !!

PS. I really enjoy your work !!!
And the detailing on your little Porters are top notch !!

Ronnie D. :cb:


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If I could own any model railroad in the world,

it would have to be the magnificent

FRANKLIN AND SOUTH MANCHESTER

of George Sellios of FSM fame.

Visited it 4 times over the years.


mike lynch


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Without hesitating for a second.

'Port Caribou R.R. & Western Navigation'  by Dick Patterson.

It was featured in Nov 1997 Model Railroader...
A 16 x 16 1/2 island type HOn3 layout,
several loops intermeshed with each other, "European style".

Great scenery, working drawbridge, real DEEP water in the harbor,
and a paddlewheel ferry that actually moved in and out of it.
Have scanned the article, but think I can't post it here,
anybody interested give me his email address.

Dick also built the "Dolly Varden" layout.
A strange concept where one looks in a gorge,
with tracks coming out of the sheer walls,
and crossing the abyss...
However these are several unconnected loops,
so no operation that makes sense is possible...
only optical illusion.

I understand Dick went to the Great Roundhouse long ago.
I am afraid the layouts are gone too.


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As a kid I stumbled across a Model Railroader magazine,
with the 'Marquette & Independence' M.R. project layout.

Something about that plan and how self contained it is,
with lots of switching and a small yard has just stuck in my mind.

One Day I will probably build it,
but it will be either N scale, or 1:55n3.


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There are a number of great layouts to choose from.

I think I would be very happy with the Alturas & Lone Pine by Whit Towers.

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Hi All,

Mike, really nice to see a revival of this thread.

It was probably overdue,
as an entertaining outlet for all us dreamers.

In my case, it's a difficult challenge.
I have found that the majority of the model railroads,
that I admired the most from a scenery perspective,
were not the best when it came to Operation.

From an Operation perspective,
most great layouts built with Operation in mind,
are not "Scenery masterpieces".
Although some certainly are.

Plus, the style of Operation would play an important role for me,
as I like running a train from start to finish as an Engineer,
rather than handing trains off to the next Dispatcher.

So I don't have an answer to this question,
but I promise to have come to some kind of a decision,
by this time tomorrow. 

:doh:

Rick


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Over the sixty years of modelling that I have been doing,
I have to say there is no particular layout I wanted or that really inspired me.

The layout that I have now (Martin's Creek) is the layout I want,
as it has taken about twenty five years for it to become what it is today,
with a number of changes and improvements over the years.

I have had inspirations from seeing many layouts at exhibitions,
on forums such as FreeRails and in magazines.

It's a life long project (mental wise)
storing those scenes in your mind that take your fancy,
and recreating them on to your layout with your own flavour to make them work.

I have tried to recreate real life scenes that I have seen on logging tramway sites,
to create the realism that I require to fulfill the scene, but not always working out right.
That is something you go back to later on to rebuild or start again.

These days along with learning new skills and better materials to build with,
one can get great results as seen on many pictures on FreeRails.

Everyone has their own standard of what they want, some get to their standard easily,
some have to work hard on it, but it is all part of the learning process,
and eventually you reach the point where you are happy with what you have.

I think the important thing is to plan a goal (roughly) of what you want,
work towards that goal and enjoy the time you spend doing it.

Sure you will have failures but the pleasure comes when you fix the failure,
and I have had many.
Inspiration comes to people in many ways and for me,
it's when I'm in the mood and the music is up loud.

I have a long way to go to improve my skills as I'm not an expert modeller,
but these days I'm not in a hurry either.
But I admire many modellers, their achievements and their skills,
we never stop learning.


:thumb:

.............................Peter


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Peter,  

Interesting reply,
especially your point about being mostly interested in your own layout,
simply due to all the planning and fixing that you've done to get to this point .....

..... which invariably sets up a situation whereby,
you already have the features you want and what interests you the most.


Since my original post, I have come to the conclusion,
that operating on the late Paul Scole's Pelican Bay and Navigation Co,
would have been a blast. 

Like a multitude of other 12 year olds,
I was stunned by photos of the Gorre and Daphetid .....
But I'm not sure I'd want to operate on a DC layout anymore ..... too spoiled.


Best

Rick


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I wouldn't really want anything smaller than O now that I've been in O for several years.
It's all too tiny for me!

Maybe John Armstrong's Canandaigua Southern?

https://www.modelrailroadacademy.com/video/canandaigua-southern-014477/

Or even though I am not a huge fan of 3-rail, I ADORE Norm Charbonneau's Hi-rail Layout:

https://www.youtube.com/user/normcharbonneau


Michael M
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I remember John's CS layout. 

A true pioneer in model railroading.


Let us not forget the many great layouts that we have here on FR.  

Has anyone ever counted the total number of photos that are in a gallery?


W C Greene
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OK, some of you "older"guys may remember Bill McClannahan's Texas & Rio Grande HO layout.
Mr. McClannahan wrote the Kalmbach book on scenery for model railroads,
which had his photo on the cover in front of his beautiful layout.

Here's my story...
I was about 10 or 11 years old and my dad took me to Dallas' Hall's Hobby House
(THE place for model trains for many years). 
The owner, Mrs. Hall had known me for a couple of years and knew that I was rabid about trains.
Dad & I walked in the back door, next to the magazine & book rack,
and I saw Mrs. Hall talking with Mr. McClannahan
(he was smoking his pipe, just like on the cover of the book!).

I told dad who he was, dad said "how do you know that?"...
"His photo is on the cover of this book!" was my reply.
Mrs. H told us to come up & meet the gent, he asked us if we'd like to see his train layout...
We followed him to his home where the incredible layout was in the upstairs attic,
I had never seen scenery on a layout
(back then, all the layouts I knew about were vast sheets of plywood,
with miles of Tru-Scale track and not a rock or tree in sight!).

Mr. McClannahan was a political and sports cartoonist for the Dallas Morning News,
he and dad talked about that, the Korean war, those pesky Russkies, and Detroit iron,
while I looked at everything and watched 2 trains slowly running around through this realistic scene.

After that, there was no more flat plywood for me,
I wanted my layout to look like his layout, although I didn't have the skills or "seasoning" to do the job.
I still think that I don't have it right but I try...and try.
This old story happened about 1959 and I suppose that Mr. Mc's layout was my "DREAM LAYOUT",
I will never forget it.

                               Woodie


Tom Harbin
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Glad I finally read this thread.
It brings back memories of many fine MRRs that I've marveled at in the various magazines.

The only one I could say I ever wanted to own,
would be the very first rendition of the Gorre and Daphetid before ANY of the additions.
I always felt there was a certain purity of mission with that layout.

I've of course greatly admired many layouts,
including several owned by current contributors on Freerails. 

To tell the truth, I don't think I would want anyone else's layout,
unless it was left to me to care for and enjoy.
For me, I really enjoy watching the creativity of others and marveling at their skill,
but it is the building, and messing up, and re-doing yet again that makes the hobby fun.
I may never have a good layout but at least I'll know I tried.

BTW, I still refer to Bill McClanahan's scenery book.
One of the best ever written.

Tom


Steven B
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So the first layout that really got my blood racing was Harry Brunk's C&S. 
I had just discovered NG&SL Gazette about the time he started writing. 
I went and bought all the back issues that I could find and afford just for his work. 
It was also about the time that Malcolm Furlow did the San Juan Southern.  

I had never been to Colorado, knew nothing about it except for what John Denver sang.
But I was able to discover Fred Shaw and Bray Dickenson at the local library,
and a few other authors who wrote about narrow gauge railroads other than Colorado's. 
One was even in my back yard... imagine my surprise and frothing. 

I didn't really get into narrow gauge railroading until the 1990s. 
But that was before DCC and it was HOn3 and I was never happy with it. 
So I went back into Standard Gauge HO 1967. 

Jack Burgess' Yosemite Valley was an inspiration,
but by 2000 I had fallen in with two local guys who had substantial layouts. 
John Zach's Sierra is still a good one to operate on
(http://www.sierrarailroad55.com)
and I became involved in operations and found that to be a area that I enjoyed. 
By the time we moved I decided to sell off my vast HO collection... still selling,
and made the leap to On30 and my first love... the late 1800s. 

There are a bunch of great layouts and modelers right here,
which is what drew me to membership in FreeRails five or six years ago. 
I get massive inspiration from reading all of your posts. 
I can't wait to finish this stinkin' house and have some fun building some trains.

 

Rick Dow
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Great posts, guys. 
Such fun reading.


Woodie! 
In 1959, I can recall sitting in a chinese food restaurant in Ottawa, with my parents.
I was reading a Model Railroader magazine I'd bought that same day,
and was amazed at the mountain scenery pictured in black and white photos therein.
My parents were busy chatting and I was engrossed in the magazine while I ate.
Like you, I'm still trying to get things right. 


So very many of us came from a background of exposure to model trains while young. 
I've given myself till Christmas to complete the trackwork on my current layout,
in order to get my grandchildren operating.
I feel like it's the only true way to pass on the interest in trains. 
I hope it's not a dying hobby like some articles claim it is.


Rick


Si.
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" There are a bunch of great layouts and modelers right here,
which is what drew me to membership in FreeRails five or six years ago. 
I get massive inspiration from reading all of your posts."


Hi Steven, Rick, Guys  :wave:


I have to agree with Steven.  :old dude:

The great modelling & inspiring layouts on Freerails ...

... are almost enough to totally boggle this aging but fertile mind !  :P



Do I have a favouite ?  ???

Mmm.  L:

IMPOSSIBLE to even begin to say.  :us:



From ancient history ?  :cool:

I would freely admit to being a BIG fan of 'The Crooked Mountain Lines' ...  :thumb:

... which I first saw years ago & couldn't stop gawping at those photos, as a kid.  :)



Keep up the great work Guys !  [toast]



:moose:



Si.


Si.
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:old dude:


' The Gum Stump & Snowshoe '  :thumb:



:moose:



Si.


Michael M
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The G.S.& S. has been a favorite of many: 

http://www.carendt.com/small-layout-scrapbook/page-38a-june-2005-special-edition/



Si.
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Hi Michael  :wave:



Thanks for the  C :cool: :cool: L  link.  :thumb:


I stumbled on that Page a few years back.  :old dude:

Good to have a look-see again ... I wish their photos were a bit bigger !  :us:


The grades are doable in 'N' and 'HO' me thinks ...  :brill:

... but try & do that plan in 1:35n2 ... & WOW ! ... How long would it have to be ? ?  L:

I did try & 'guesstimate' that a while back ...

... I seem to recall, with 4" clearance height & totally EVIL grades !  :shocked:



Mmm ... I do like it though ! ...  :shocked:

... 2 or 3 car trains & some  C :cool: :cool: L  scenery potential ...

... all on a nice & narrow shelf !  :bg:



One of our Members did an end-to-end 'flip' of the plan a while back ...  :dt:

... which also turned the 'G.S.& S.' high-yard ... into the low-yard.

His 'versions' are an interesting take on the original !  :P





If I was ever to attempt a 'G.S.& S.' I think I'd do Blackclouds ^^ top-version ...

... a high-yard/low-yard 'flip' ... front/back 'flip' ... left/right 'flip' ... from the original.  L:

An EVERYTHING 'flipped' version !  :Crazy:  ;)



Any thoughts folks ?  :us:



:moose:



Si.


Paul Napier
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Dwayne wrote:
Hmmm... gotta say that I wouldn't want anyone's layout.
As good as some of them have been, none have ever caused me "layout envy".
The only layout I want is the one that I create.
That's just how I roll. :P


When I first read this thread I had exactly the same thought.

There are many layouts I look at and think 'Now I like that',
but that is because I like how the builder (or builders) have interpreted a scene or theme,
or developed a special ambience. 

It does not mean I'd like to have the layout. 
  
Like you I like the pieces of art I have created with my own research, hands, skills and ideas.

Paul
 

Last edited on Wed Jan 1st, 2020 07:03 am by Paul Napier

W C Greene
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I agree...
I love to look at nice layouts, but I want what I have.
Even the great John Allen's layout had its share of "faults"...and he said so!

Woodie


corv8
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A philosophical question....
Most of us have projects for the next 300 years.
 
So in my mind it would be a blessing, if I could acquire a layout that meets my basic requirements,
and then could concentrate on other things, that are more important to me.

In my case, building locos, passenger cars and maybe spanning catenary on the layout.
Others have other priorities.... 

There are great layouts  (F&SM comes to my mind) 
where it's obvious the owners main target was an impressive layout with plenty of detail,
and it was less important what would move on its tracks.


Michael M
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Si,

On the G.S.& S. I would probably add some length to it, and maybe a little width for 1/35 scale. 
Say maybe 18" by 8'. 

Could cut it into two four-foot sections to make it easily moveable. 
That should help with the grades, and maybe give some room for run-around tracks. 

If an HO 0-4-0 can tackle the grades,
then there's no reason that a bashed HO mechanism with a 1/35 scale cab couldn't make it.


W C Greene
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Howdy guys...
Gerold rightly states that many modelers aren't concerned about actually operating trains on their layouts,
just the art of detail and scenery.
For me, this has been pretty much true for many, many years.
I have built several layouts in different scales and became "captive" with the details and not really the trains.
Of late, my current (and probably last) layout is about as "finished" as it will ever be.
There's the minor details and scenery to be worked on, but it looks like I wanted it to look.
However, since I got fed up with the link & pin couplers and "modernized" with Kadee automatics,
I have become less concerned with the small stuff and now find myself being an "operator" rather than a builder.
Now, the trackwork, which has been secondary to most else, has taken over the bulk of my modeling time,
as I worry more about whether anything can run on my handlaid track...or not run as the case may be.
The "track crew" (myself) has worked overtime to ensure that trains run smoothly,
and the stub switches work and align properly.
Now, this has become my main objective, weeds and dirt are lower on the "finishing scale".
It helps that my layout is wireless and doesn't depend on polished rail and Brite Boys.
Now I am REALLY having fun with my layout.
Would I dream about someone else's layout?
Probably not, I now have the one that I dreamed about...and it's in my garage!

Woodie





John Teall
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If I had any of them,
people would hate me for the alien world changes I would make.

Some track plans in Model Railroader that were never, as far as I know,
physically built, or maybe were but I don't remember.

An infrastructure of 'Romney Hythe & Dymchurch' proportions,
in a post eco-apocalyptic world.
With solar-powered multiple-unit inter-village passenger services.
It would have to be more scenery than track, but enough track for operation.

Yup 'Gum Stump & Snow Shoe' was a good one, something about that size.
'Portage Hill & Communipah' was another. 
Except I would build or convert them to 2' or narrower gauge,
in the largest scale I could find room for. 

And I am interested in operation as much as modeling,
but my idea of modeling, is concept illustration. 
As it is, I've never had a lot of resources or room. 

My intro to railroad modeling was when I was 1 year old in 1949. 
Friend of my Dad's had a single track around his basement,
with a working relay based signal system, automatic reversing,
and one single trolley car, as its sole rolling stock. 

I've been hooked all my life. 
It helps that my Dad was a tellegrapher towerman clerk,
most of my childhood and even for a couple of decades after.



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