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'Corrimal Colliery Incline'
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 Posted: Mon Sep 26th, 2016 08:57 am
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oztrainz
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Hi Si,
There are some tricks to it.
1 - You need to have a block big enough that can be screwed down to the baseboard/track supporting block at the module joint. This guarantees that noting will move on either side of the joint.
2 - The blocks are bigger because there are curves down to 15" radius jumping the joints, and the tracks sweep a bigger area than for straight track jumping a joint.
3 - clamp your modules together and screw down your first PC board block on one of the modules. Insert a thin piece of cardboard/stryrene (say 0.010" approx)between the blocks and screw the second block down. Remove this spacer before commencing soldering. This space prevents the blocks on adjacent modules from making contact and creating unwanted short circuits that are difficult to trace. :doh:
4 - make sure the track is level across the PC board blocks. You may have to shim back from the blocks if your sleepers under the rail are not high enough. Be careful how hard you spike down the track adjacent to the blocks.
5- tin the PC board block where you expect the rails to go
6 - tin the outside foot on the rail. This prevents solder wicking back to the inside running surfaces of the rail.
7 - solder down 1 rail across both blocks first. Do not cut the rail.
8 - Using a track gauge as a guide solder the second rail. This now gives you 2 rails soldered to the blocks that are in gauge all the way across both blocks.
9 - CAREFULLY cut the rails at the joint using a Dremel with a thin cutting disc, or use a thin stiff-backed saw with fine teeth. Take your time and do one rail at a time.
10 - isolate both rails by cutting through the copper clad surface between the rails on both blocks.
11 - check that there is NO electrical continuity between either rail on both blocks AND between adjacent blocks. Also check diagonally.
12 - add your preferred jumper leads/plugs. Electrical continuity across the module joint is through the jumper leads and plugs - NOT BY THE RAILS. Check that you have correct continuity when you have the plugs together and no continuity across the joint on either rail if the jumper plugs are disconnected.

There you go - all done



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John Garaty
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 Posted: Tue Sep 27th, 2016 01:51 am
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Salada
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Hello John,

Tee are a couple of things I don't understand about the " real" Corrimal (your Post No 104):

As the Fulls rolled downhill into the dead end Fulls Arrival road, presumably Neddy had to pull the rake/cut of fulls slightly UPHILL to the head of the fulls incline ?

Also, how were the fulls held securely between freeing Neddy & attaching the cable clips ?

What stopped Neddy + fulls heading over the incline "hump" & careering down the incline ?

You said the skip arrestor was mounted OUTSIDE the gauge & rubbed against the AXLES ??

I have seen a similar arrestor on a NorthEast Durham cable system but the arrestor rails were inside the track gauge & rubbed against the wheel flange backs (no danger of wagons riding up off the running rails)

Regards, Michael

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 Posted: Tue Sep 27th, 2016 03:08 am
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oztrainz
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Hi Michael,
You have way too much thinking time on your hands :P So dealing with the questions raised in order.

As the Fulls rolled downhill into the dead end Fulls Arrival road, presumably Neddy had to pull the rake/cut of fulls slightly UPHILL to the head of the fulls incline?

Our understanding of how this worked was that the dead-end track was uphill towards the old Brokers Nose mine and was on part of the trackbed formed part of the old 1880's/1890's incline. As the wagons slowed They could be spagged, Neddy could then be attached. One sprag would probably have been left inserted and Neddy would drag 2 or 3 skips at a time slightly downhill towards the top of the incline and the start of the haulage rope. The sprag would prevent the loaded skips overrunning Neddy

Also, how were the fulls held securely between freeing Neddy & attaching the cable clips ?

The skips were held by sprags through the wheel spokes. The skips would have been held just clear of the start of the haulage rope, then manually wheeled forward singly (or doubly as shown in the 1951 photos) to just beyond the start of the haulage rope. This area was on a slight flat before the incline nosed over hill onto the grade. The clip would be attached to the haulage rope by thumping the collar home with a hammer, and the skip would then head off downgrade at the speed of the haulage rope.

What stopped Neddy + fulls heading over the incline "hump" & careering down the incline ?
Neddy's wheeler and Neddy's good horse sense? :bg: Th buffer of some parked skips at the incline top would also help.

If the haulage rope was stopped I have no doubt that pit horses would probably have been walked down the side of the incline tracks to rescue derailed skips/drop of rails or sleepers for repairs/etc.

The top of the Fulls incline was protected by a heavy timber block that could be locked across the Fulls Incline track if crews had to work on the incline grade. The empties incline was protected by a "monkey chock" or "bobbin" that prevented any roll backs from getting away from the incline as the empty skip was uncoupled. The uncoupling zone was on a falling grade towards the trestle that crossed the Fulls incline track.

You said the skip arrestor was mounted OUTSIDE the gauge & rubbed against the AXLES ??

Ummm - I almost got that correct. The angles rubbed on the outside wheelfaces as the skips "hunted". This straightened up the skips and, through friction, washed the speed off the loaded skips before they hit the wobble leading to the dead end. They must have been reasonably effective as brakes. One of the reference books gives their dimensions as 6' long. The skip wheelbase was 2'10".

I'd better go back and fix that post.. Now fixed

Thanks for the thinking - it helps me keep the story straight

:bg:

Last edited on Tue Sep 27th, 2016 03:12 am by oztrainz



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John Garaty
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 Posted: Tue Sep 27th, 2016 05:10 pm
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Salada
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Hello John,
Correct - idle hands do mischief make; but I can't do much else right now.

Thanks for your further explanations, now fully understood.

The arrestor/retarder rail ratio of 6' to 2'10" wheelbase is similar to the one I saw.

Also the wooden stop blocks at incline head very similar to old colliery incline systems here. These comprise 2 heavy timber baulks, 1 across the running rails, pivoted at one end outside the gauge. The free end of this block rests against a shorter pivoted block outside the gauge. Swinging a heavy maul against the shorter block knocks it clear of the end of the transverse block which then swings open under the push of the wagon wheel flanges.

Some inclines had another version. A heavy baulk horizontally pivoted between the running rails & counter weighted so that the axles of wagons running in the correct direction would depress this upright timber "finger" & pass over it. The leading axle of any runaway in the wrong direction would jam against the raised, counterweighted "finger". Usually known as a "bull", perhaps because it resembled a single horn ?

Some of the private cable haulage rail systems were said to be so efficient compared to horse or loco lines that the first 'run' of the day paid the whole day's wage bill plus all repair/running expenses. All pioneered by Mr Stephenson.

regards, Michael

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 Posted: Wed Sep 28th, 2016 12:39 am
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oztrainz
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Hi Micahel and all,

Salada wrote:
...

Some inclines had another version. A heavy baulk horizontally pivoted between the running rails & counter weighted so that the axles of wagons running in the correct direction would depress this upright timber "finger" & pass over it. The leading axle of any runaway in the wrong direction would jam against the raised, counterweighted "finger". Usually known as a "bull", perhaps because it resembled a single horn ?

This is a pretty good description of the "monkey chock" or "bobbin" at the top of the Empties incline to prevent run backs after the skip was unclipped from the rope

Some of the private cable haulage rail systems were said to be so efficient compared to horse or loco lines that the first 'run' of the day paid the whole day's wage bill plus all repair/running expenses. All pioneered by Mr Stephenson.

regards, Michael


Ahh but Corrimal was powered by Mr Newton. Are you sure you picked the correct Mr?? Must be those pain meds.



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 Posted: Wed Sep 28th, 2016 07:58 pm
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Salada
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I see it's "Bash a Poorly Pommie" time in our former prison colony.

Yes John, POWERED by Isaac but DESIGNED by George.

Is it boring always being right ??

Cheers, Michael

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 Posted: Thu Sep 29th, 2016 01:52 am
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oztrainz
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Hi Michael,
You may be right with a Geordie link somewhere in the history of the incline - whether it is direct to George or not?? For the next mine south of Corrimal, the Mount Keira mine, the village on the flat above the mine adits was colloquially known as "Geordie Town", so the ex-Tyne-siders were out here early digging coal in the Illawarra, from about the 1850's.

One wonders when the self-acting continuous rope inclines started to be used in the UK? The self-acting inclines in the Illawarra started from the 1860's or so. And Corrimal wasn't the only mine locally using continuous rope inclines, both powered and unpowered to move skips both on the surface and underground from the 1860's.

There's probably a history doctorate in tracking down the links between 'the old country" and "the colonies" with respect to who came up with what, where, and when. There would also have been some inspired "bush engineering" that would have been going on independent of "old country" influence.

As far as that "former prison colony" goes, one of my ancestors was a sergeant in the First Fleet's NSW Regiment (aka the Rum Corps),in charge of that first lot of convicts -
"Seize up that malingerer - break out the cat - 2 dozen lashes for insubordination" :P

Next up a diversion into trees for Herb,



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 Posted: Thu Sep 29th, 2016 05:30 pm
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oztrainz
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Hi all

For Herb, who recently wrote back in Post #99,  

But to a lot of us, trees are either too difficult to make-- (my putrid efforts have always looked like fuzzy lollypops) -- or too expensive to buy good looking specimens -- in even a small quantity of what's needed. I take my hat off to those here (and elsewhere) who can pull it off.It would be wonderful for someone to find a way of even coming up with a flexible material thick enough to be formed into a multitude of various sized ''lumps'' to represent a forest canopy, then the edge of the forest would be the only problem. Would have to be ''airy'' like a thinned out version of the old horsehair packing--not anywhere as dense as foam. Spray glue and a sprinkle of commercial ''leaves'' --or real leaves run thru a blender for autumn--- on top. To look convincing, it would have to be capable to be looked into--not just at---the top.


So - Getting Lost in the bush...

As well as Allan Rockett previously mentioned, Forum member Dan Pickard is perhaps one of the best exponents of making realistic gum trees in model form. His "Splitter's Gorge" diorama is close on 3' high and even that is under scale for some of the bigger Mountain Ash gums that top out at close to 300' high (that's over 6' high dead scale) . So here's a reminder of what large model gum trees are all about in "Splitters Gorge". There are a couple of hundred trees and ferns in this diorama. 



See http://www.freerails.com/edit_post.php?id=56507 and the following 3 posts for some examples of modelling gum trees. Forum member Rod Hutchinson's "Regnan's Tramway" also features. I've borrowed from Dan's techniques of using dead sedum flowers and modified them slightly for the smaller gums found in the 1920's locally that we need for Corrimal. Dan also provided a big box of dead sedum flowers for me to get started on. Thanks Dan.

A reminder of the prototype look we're after, with the "airy look" that Herb mentioned


 



So how to make a lot of model trees very quickly using dead sedum flowers?
See you next post...  




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 Posted: Thu Sep 29th, 2016 07:32 pm
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oztrainz
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Hi all again,

So down to the nitty gritty of making trees and some of the philosophy of tree-making as well...

The main area where I differ form Dan's techniques is that I don't aggregate or clump multiple sedum flower branches to make the bigger trees. I also won't be making the big buttress roots that are characteristic of the bigger gum and most of the non-pine type trees. I figure I can camouflage this lack of detail with lower level scrub around the base of the trees.


So getting started, here's a before and after - the "before" on the right and the "after" on the left




So what do these sedums look like in the ground?


Now at the end of their flowering season, if you leave the flowers attached to the plant, the flower head remains, the leaves fall off and the stem dries out hollow. Cut them off as close to the ground as you can. If you leave the roots undisturbed they'll be back next season, with more of them :2t:  Caution: they grow a bit like a weed and can get away, so if you are worried about this, plant them in pots, not in the ground. 

The best sedum variety for gum trees is the "Autumn Joy" variety. There are other sedum varieties that have a slightly different flowerhead structure. These should work equally well, and as a bonus, give you a slightly different looking "model tree"

The beauty here is that each of the dead flowerheads has a slightly different structure. Just like in nature, no two trees look exactly alike. So this gives a slightly different look to any of the future model trees and we haven't actually done anything to the flowereheads yet. Unknowingly, this has just got you away from the "all the background trees look the same" trap  

Some preparation is required.

1 - after the dead flowerheads are removed from the plant, allow them to fully dry out in a dry sunny area for several weeks.

2 - remove the remains of any leaves still attached. There may be some smaller dead dead leaves just up under the flowerheads. These can be removed by rubbing them with a finger nail.

3 - the flowerheads can be fragile and you may snap the odd branch or 2 off when removing the dead leaves in the previous step. Keep these bits. They can be used for smaller trees or scrunched and put through a bender for groundcover. If you want a more open look, at this stage, if you lightly rub the flowerhead, some of the looser flower remains will fall off. You can also easily snap off parts of the flowerhead to open up the underlying "branch structure". Keep what is removed/falls off for ground cover. Now for the interesting bits.

4 - You can either use a cheap while rattle can or a white acrylic in your airbrush. Paint up from below the flowerheads.


this whole table was well less than 30 minutes work. Some variation in the depth of cover here is not a problem and may help to vary the look of your finished trees. by the time you have done them all with white... 

4 - It's time for green. You can either use a variety of green rattle cans or an airbrush. I used my airbrush with a variety of Tamiya flat acrylic greens.


Again variation in the depth of cover across the tree helps. You are after a misted spay technique rather that a "drown it all solid green" technique. I also shot some green up from under as well.

Sometimes more than one green can be misted on. This helps colour variation across the tree as well as between different trees. I was using the open cup on the airbrush. I just added different greens as I ran low. and kept spraying. This also assisted the colour variation.

Don't worry about the green being on the branches near the "leaves". Most branches are still slightly green out near the leaves, Check out this gum tree at the right of the next photo -


   

5 - Gum trees are a bit different in that they ooze gum and it stains the bark. Skip this step if your trees have a different bark. So with a few dab of an artist oil dark brown on the trunk and a swipe with a bush loaded with thinners/mineral turpentine, you get


Allow to dry - using a white beadfoam stand is not recommended for this step. the turps tends to dissolve it.

Gum trees also tend to shed their bark. I'm skipping modelling this, but Dan and Rod have successfully modelled this on their trees (See my previous post for "Splitter's Gorge" and related links)

6- place gently in a box for storage until you are ready to plant them out on your layout




7 - Take some care getting them out of the box when needed. Remember nothing is lost if anything does break off. It either turns into another smaller tree or ground cover :2t:

 
That'll do for now, Happy tree making,
 



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John Garaty
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 Posted: Fri Sep 30th, 2016 03:47 am
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Rod Hutchinson
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Tree making is in a similar league to scratchbuilding structures. It is modelling in the true sense of the word.

However you can make quick gum trees using sedum plants. Grab 3 stalks. Adjust them so the flower heads are staggered. Bind the trunks with florist tape. Over paint with Artist acrylic paste to create 'bark'. Whilst this is drying give the bark texture. Paint to suit.

Last edited on Fri Sep 30th, 2016 03:53 am by Rod Hutchinson



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