Freerails Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Logging & Mining > 'Corrimal Colliery Incline'

Freerails IS ACCEPTING new Members ... To join Freerails ... See how to Register as a Member in the 'Joining Freerails' Forum

'Corrimal Colliery Incline'
 Moderated by: . Page:  First Page Previous Page  ...  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  Next Page Last Page  
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Sun Mar 7th, 2021 02:11 am
  PMQuoteReply
211th Post
oztrainz
Super Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 10th, 2013
Location: Unanderra, Australia
Posts: 1034
Status: 
Offline
 
Hi all,

Now that Si has let the cat out of the bag about an "under development" battery-electric locomotive,
perhaps we should finish of the Water Tank module as a topic first? 

This early 2013 photo shows the Water Tank module shortly after the completion of track laying in Stage 1 of the layout build.
This is looking towards the train turntable on the Mountain 1 module that formed the end of the Stage 1 build.





Tracks on the module from the left -

standage road for full or damaged skips,
the placeholder sand-dryer shed and its access track,
wagon repair siding,
"Empties" track from trestle at the end of the incline,
"Fulls" track for loaded skips arriving from the mine
(here train turntable because the mine and the modules to get to it are "yet-to-be-built"). 


Only one photo is known to exist of the "wriggly tin" side of the sand-dryer shed.

It appears to have been nothing too fancy.
So, neither is our model of it, as displayed in Easter 2013.





The shed is that recent it has no chance to grow "scenery" around it. 


This next photo shows the Magic Trains Stainz,
that stands-in as the model for Corrimal's larger second Krauss locomotive,
at the Water Tank and the ash heap.

With a parked battery-electric loco on the repair track,
and the other battery-electric loco coupled to skips on the "Fulls" track.





The battery-electric locomotive are non-operational Grandt Line kits,
that have been powered by using HO mechanisms.

The battery boxes are loaded up with lead shot,
to increase adhesion and hauling capability of these small locomotives.  


By Easter 2015, the tracks had been ballasted and some basic scenery had started to appear.

Most of the intervening time during this 2 year period,
had been spent getting more reliable operations and adding scenery further "downhill".





Stabled in the wagon repair siding is Corrimal's regular Hawthorn/Leslie steam loco, "Burra" (the green one)
and the visiting twin "Kooka" (the brown one).
I'll save the story for how "Burra" got its name for another time.

By Easter 2017, the Water Tank Area had grown figures, some paths,
and some unkempt grass to complete the scenery on this module.





And there's still another 7 modules to come in this build saga. 

That'll do for this post.

The story of the new mysterious battery-electric loco will be along shortly. 

 



____________________
Regards,
John Garaty
Unanderra in oz
Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Mar 7th, 2021 02:46 pm
  PMQuoteReply
212th Post
Ken C
Registered


Joined: Tue Jun 16th, 2015
Location:  Calgary, Alberta Canada
Posts: 994
Status: 
Offline
 
John

Looking at your photos,
there is always something new to see.

Which reminds me I do need to get my GRANDT battery electric,
out of storage and get it finished and running.

Some what tied up at the moment, finishing a couple of models,
and getting a write up done for the "NGDU" magazine,
which could be the hardest part of the build.

:bang:




____________________
Ken Clark
GWN

Kaslo & Slocan Railway
International Navigation & Trading Co
Kootenay Railway & Navigation Co.
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Mar 8th, 2021 10:35 pm
  PMQuoteReply
213th Post
oztrainz
Super Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 10th, 2013
Location: Unanderra, Australia
Posts: 1034
Status: 
Offline
 
Hi all again,

Description of the remaining seven modules that make up this layout is on hold temporarily.
Time for a sideways step into battery-electric underground loco design and the layout's coal hauling requirements. 

We needed 2 operational battery-electric locomotives.
One did the shunt move of taking full skips at the end of the steam tramway to move loaded skips to the top of the incline.





The other did the "underground run" from the surface exchange siding with empty skips,
"underground" to the reloading point and then the return of loaded skips to the surface exchange sidings. 





Previously the layout's underground coal haulage requirements were met by the powered Grandt Line battery-electric locomotive kits. 





As supplied, these are an unpowered kit.

Initially these were powered by the original Bachmann 44-Ton power bogies.
But these were only available second-hand and at about 10 years since they were last made,
the quality of any replacement mechanism could be described as "variable" at best.

These two locomotives were repowered by new, but now discontinued,
Bachmann "Underground Ernie" mechanisms as shown below.
This "custom re-motor" was done by team member Professor Klyzlr.





When ballasted up with lead shot in the battery boxes, these locomotives weigh in at just under 60 g each.
But those reverse curves on the underground loading track are down to 250 mm (10") radius.
These locos struggled to moves trains of more than 10 skips through the those reverse curves. 
But our "standard train was 11 skips. So we needed a "Plan B" hauler for the "underground run". 


For last Christmas I was able to track down a Bachmann 45-Tonner as my Christmas present.





Come back next time as we try to convert a HO locomotive into BigBat
(The BIG BATtery-electric locomotive) in O-scale narrow-gauge.   
 



____________________
Regards,
John Garaty
Unanderra in oz
Back To Top

 Posted: Wed Mar 10th, 2021 08:27 am
  PMQuoteReply
214th Post
oztrainz
Super Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 10th, 2013
Location: Unanderra, Australia
Posts: 1034
Status: 
Offline
 
Hi all again

It's time to de-mystify Big Bat (the BIG BATtery-electric locomotive.
First let's have a look at some engineering justification of why the build will go the way its does once construction starts. 
The earliest mention of battery-electric locomotives underground used for main line haulage I have found was in a 1913 thesis.
This thesis stated that a battery-electric locomotive was used in 1887 at the Lykens Valley Company mine in Pennsylvania.
I have no doubt that the UK and Europe either got there first or were not very far behind that 1887 date,
but so far I haven't been able to confirm earliest dates for battery-electric
(aka storage battery) locomotive usage underground in those regions.


That thesis also demonstrated that rod-coupled two-axle locomotives gave 25% better tractive effort,
than for an identical twin-motor locomotive without the coupling rods.
This is because the rods prevent the leading axle from prematurely slipping as the torque from the motor is applied.
So the idea of the first bogie battery-electric locomotives being rod-coupled (as in the 45-tonner chassis)
and being in existence by the mid-1920's is not that far-fetched. 


If you add in that bogie electric mining locomotives existed in Europe by the mid 1890's
(See Historique des locomotives électriques (rail.lu) 
and that the exposed collector gear as shown in the link was banned in NSW for use in underground coal mines,
then it is possible that by the mid-1920's that a bogie-battery-electric locomotive,
could have been hauling coal underground in NSW. 


Ok that's enough of bogie battery loco justification.
What's the 45-tonner look like as a build chassis?




L: 
We're going to have to do something about the driving position.
Otherwise the driver is going to be bouncing off the roof supports over the track underground.  

Also the green engine hoods that fit on top of this chassis are diecast.
Maybe it might be a good idea to keep them for extra adhesive weight?





The bare chassis weighs in at 73g but the engine hoods add another 40g to bring the weight up to almost 120g.
This is almost twice as heavy as the Grandt Line 4-wheeler's. 

Meet Stumpy, BigBat's new driver.


 

After he recovers from his surgery, he'll be nice and comfy in BigBat's new centre cab.
 




There is still more to do.
The battery boxes on each end have yet to get lead shot either side of the green engine hood and then get their lids.
So how does BigBat stack up against the smaller locomotives so far?





L:   It looks we might be on a winner.  :2t: 

More BigBat next time.




____________________
Regards,
John Garaty
Unanderra in oz
Back To Top

 Posted: Wed Mar 10th, 2021 02:19 pm
  PMQuoteReply
215th Post
Ken C
Registered


Joined: Tue Jun 16th, 2015
Location:  Calgary, Alberta Canada
Posts: 994
Status: 
Offline
 
John

GE built 8 wheel electric's as early as 1917, with end cab,
in service at Britannia Copper Mine, just North of Vancouver B.C.

It was a 40 Ton unit, model L50440E80 articulated.
Hauling 13 Ton bottom dumps with a capacity of 20 Ton's.
 
A typical train being 10 cars.




____________________
Ken Clark
GWN

Kaslo & Slocan Railway
International Navigation & Trading Co
Kootenay Railway & Navigation Co.
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Mar 11th, 2021 08:56 am
  PMQuoteReply
216th Post
oztrainz
Super Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 10th, 2013
Location: Unanderra, Australia
Posts: 1034
Status: 
Offline
 
Thanks Ken,

If GE was building 8-wheel electric locomotives during WW1,
then an Aussie bogie locomotive in the mid-1920's probably rates as "historically plausible".

A little known fact is the real Corrimal mine had the only bogie loco that went underground in an Aussie coal mine.
It was 3'6" gauge rather than the 2' gauge used in our model.


My father wrote the specifications for the contract for this solo bogie locomotive and my layout construction partner,
Guy Gadsden actually worked on building it at E.M. Baldwin at the Castle Hill plant in Sydney.
It was a diesel-hydraulic unit but it arrived on site way later than our chosen modelling period of 1924-1928 for BigBat.

By coincidence it was also a 40-ton unit.
The specification called for it to be safely able to handle a load of just one longwall chock on a single flatcar,
but the grade was 1 in 8 underground on wet greasy rail.

:w:




____________________
Regards,
John Garaty
Unanderra in oz
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Mar 11th, 2021 02:44 pm
  PMQuoteReply
217th Post
Ken C
Registered


Joined: Tue Jun 16th, 2015
Location:  Calgary, Alberta Canada
Posts: 994
Status: 
Offline
 
John

Somewhere I have a photo of a "Mannix Coal Co." loco,
that was built by them into a DE.

Which if I recall correctly,
used two Jeffery's electric units for trucks under the rebuild.

Will take a look and see if I can find the photo.




____________________
Ken Clark
GWN

Kaslo & Slocan Railway
International Navigation & Trading Co
Kootenay Railway & Navigation Co.
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Mar 12th, 2021 10:08 pm
  PMQuoteReply
218th Post
oztrainz
Super Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 10th, 2013
Location: Unanderra, Australia
Posts: 1034
Status: 
Offline
 
Thanks Ken,

Jeffery did make some rod-coupled 2-axle battery electric locomotives.
So... if Corrimal management heard of the Mannix Coal "beast" in a engineering journal or similar, then BigBat??

My feeling is that discussions of the merits or the building of bogie underground locomotives would have
appeared in "Railway Engineering", "The Engineer" or similar engineering or mining trade journals.

Certainly the Europeans were building end-cab bogie electrics that went underground by the early 1900's. 
But the end-cab design wasn't an option for BigBat because of the big central blob
of diecast chassis that runs well beyond the bogie pivots in the 45-ton chassis.

So - bring on the centre-cab option with the battery boxes outboard of the cab.




____________________
Regards,
John Garaty
Unanderra in oz
Back To Top

 Posted: Sat Mar 13th, 2021 04:22 am
  PMQuoteReply
219th Post
oztrainz
Super Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 10th, 2013
Location: Unanderra, Australia
Posts: 1034
Status: 
Offline
 
Hi all again

Ready for some more BigBat?? 


First the cab and battery boxes got some structural reinforcement as "biff-protection" from swinging battery boxes,
when they are being craned off of recharging or being reloaded onto the locomotive after charging.










The battery boxes also grew some lifting eyes.
These came from the Artesina ship fitting range.

And then it was time for the paint shop of our contract painters - Slapdash Ltd.
The cab and battery boxes were the easy bit.





The chassis and flycranks were spray-painted under power,
while running up against a stop block.

Even BigBat isn't going to get over this one.  :bg:





The first coat was a grey primer followed by a coat "Workshop White".





Stumpy still has another session booked at the Slapdash beautician,
for a deep cleanse and some body paint, even coal miners don't get THAT black.


BigBat is ready for haulage trials next.

BigBat now weighs in at about 180g about 3x heavier than the 2-axle locomotives,
for at least 1.5x increased tractive effort when compared to a single smaller locomotive.  

After the load trials, enhancements such as driving controls will be added to the cab,
as well as a layer of coaldust for the bodywork and some grease stains to the whirly bits.


That'll do for this post.




____________________
Regards,
John Garaty
Unanderra in oz
Back To Top

 Posted: Sat Mar 13th, 2021 07:19 am
  PMQuoteReply
220th Post
Kitbash0n30
Registered


Joined: Mon Dec 10th, 2012
Location: Boonville, Missouri USA
Posts: 819
Status: 
Offline
 
Hey, background story sounds sensible to me!


And that rail.lu is a grand website,

have had it bookmarked for a decade at least.




____________________
See y'all later, Forrest.
Screw the rivets, I'm building for atmosphere
Back To Top


 Current time is 04:50 am
Page:  First Page Previous Page  ...  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  Next Page Last Page  

Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Logging & Mining > 'Corrimal Colliery Incline'
Top



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems