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Ray Dunakin
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I've started a new building for the town of Mineral Ridge, on my In-ko-pah Railroad. This is my first attempt at modeling a brick building. I'm using Sintra PVC foam board, and scribing the brick pattern. I began by cutting out the front wall from 6mm thick Sintra, and drawing the door and window openings with pencil. This must be done lightly so as not to leave indentations that will mar the brick pattern:





To scribe the horizontal lines, I made a special tool out of brass. Two pieces of .020" thick brass strips were soldered onto opposite sides of a square brass rod:




Another simple tool was made from a strip of .020" brass, for scribing the vertical lines. (I call it scribing, but on these short lines I'm really just pressing the tool into the material.)




Here are a couple shots of the entire front wall, after the basic brick pattern has been scribed. There are some goofs that will need to be patched up with putty. Also, the top portion of the wall will be built up with layers of thinner scribed PVC for a 3D effect:






I used 3mm board to build up the decorative upper portion of the wall:






I still have to add more layers to create the trim at the top edge of the wall, but here's how it looks so far:




And here it is set in place on the layout, to give you an idea of how this building will look in its environment:




There will be stone arches above the door and window openings on the ground floor, and stone lintels on the second story windows. To create these, I will be casting resin stone blocks. I started by carving the masters from 3mm Sintra. Here they are laid out and ready to pour the silicone rubber mold:




While I was at it, I also carved some blocks which will be used on my next building:





That's all for now, more later. Enjoy!

thtroll
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I can't find the words to reflect the craftsmanship. I am in awe. Wow, just amazing.

dennischee
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great work I like the way you used the brass tube, good thinking 99

Dennis:apl::apl::2t::2t:

Herb Kephart
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I agree with Thtroll and Dennis

Great looking brick and stone!

Didn't realize that Sintra was that soft--


Herb

W C Greene
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Outstanding! The brick work is very nice, I am waiting to see this finished, it will be a masterpiece.

Woodie

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:moose::moose::moose::glad:

Ray Dunakin
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Here's a brief update:

I finished the fancy trim on the top edge of the wall:




This is supposed to represent a pretty old, run-down building, so I've also started distressing some of the bricks:




Still have more distressing and aging to do, but this gives you some idea of where I'm headed.

Ray Dunakin
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Time for another update:

I needed a tool to press the mortar lines into the edges of the window openings, so I just took an old #11 blade and ground it flat:






I also carved more wear into some of the bricks. The loose brick was created by gluing a thin wedge to the face of the scribed brick:






The side walls of this building would have been made of cheaper material such as rubble stone, so I scribed stone texture into the upper portion of the walls. To see a step-by-step of this technique, check out my previous build here:

http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_1.html

On the east wall, only a small portion of the wall will be visible above the previous building:




My next building will probably be only a single story, so I had to texture a large portion of the west wall of this building:




I added stone lintels to the upstairs windows. The thin ones at the bottom of the windows are resin castings. I had hoped to use existing castings for the large ones above the windows, but they were a bit too tall. So I just carved some new ones out of Sintra PVC specifically for this building:




The bottom of the front wall wall is stone, so I glued on some of the resin castings I'd made for my previous building. On the right, the castings have been cut to fit the sloping sidewalk:




I also glued some castings to the foundation. Eventually all the "stone" parts of the building will be painted the same sandstone color as the previous building:




The front and side walls were glued together and the subfloor installed. Then I discovered that the foundation is slightly non-square, preventing the building from fitting up tight against the sidewalk. No big deal, I'll just fill the gap later:




Here's how it all looks so far, with the building temporarily in position on the layout:







That's all for now, more later. Enjoy!


.

Ray Dunakin
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I forgot to include this...

Here's a small, "quick and dirty" test piece I did last year when I was first considering using Sintra to simulate brick:




As you can see it looks a lot better after it's painted.

Bernd
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Ray,

WOW :shocked: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb:

Bernd

Last edited on Sat Sep 28th, 2013 09:58 pm by Bernd

dennischee
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Great work Ray,
The k.i.s.s. formular works every time, simple tools, and a bit of thought into the procedure and a great result.

Dennis
:apl::apl::moose::moose::moose::moose:

Lost Creek RR
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I second that big time. How cool is that brick work.
Rod.

Ray Dunakin
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I've finished the roof and rear wall, using the same design as described on my previous build. The rear wall is removable for access to the interior, and is not detailed because it will be positioned against a cliff:



I also built two box-like structures to contain the interior details. These slide out of the main structure:




I had planned to use resin "stone" castings over the window and door arches. However, when I laid them out on the model, it just didn't look right to me. So I went with Plan B -- brick arches. These were made from 1mm thick Sintra PVC, scribed, cut to shape and glued into place:




I've started building the frames for the windows and door. So far only the most basic part of the frames has been done, using .080" x .125" strips of styrene. There are still more details to be added. Here they are temporarily fitted into the building:




Because this building is supposed to be rundown and weathered, I scribed some woodgrain into the styrene strips prior to cutting them to fit. The curved part was made by bending one of the strips around a small saucepan, then heating it by holding it above the electric burner on our stove:




Here's a shot of the building temporarily in position on the foundation:




I also screwed something up... My first attempt at scribing the bricks at the forward edge of the side wall was a complete disaster. The red putty used to smooth the joint crumbles when scribed, and the joints tend to cause the scribing tool to go off course. I think it would have worked better if I'd used an epoxy putty. Also, I goofed up the spacing of the mortar lines. I'll have to put some more thought into this before making another attempt.




.

Alwin
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Hi Ray,

Your buildings look great :2t:.
I also think the brick arches are the better choice on this one. Let the good work coming!

Alwin

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I hope the building will be an hospital, because that slope right at the front door...... (distant rumbling approaching. Hordes of lawyers are a'comin').[url=javascript:emoticon(':glad:', 'images/emoticons/yahoo.gif')]document.write('[/url]');

Ray Dunakin
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I've finished the doors and windows for the ground floor. The doors were built up from strips of .020" styrene. although it's not visible in the photo, the doors and frames all have simulated wood grain. The door handles will be added after the doors are painted:







.

W C Greene
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INFREAKINMARVELOUS...the brickwork is just wonderful and those doors & windows are...well, I don't have words. I love the whole thing, screw ups and all, it is most realistic and looks as it should.

Woodie

Herb Kephart
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Just about as perfect as architectural modeling can get!

Window mutins a scale size, crisp and square---

Great brick and stone work--almost a shame to leave it outside.



Herb

Ray Dunakin
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I finished building the frames for the upstairs windows. Here's one of them:




Then I decided it would be fun to have an old air conditioner hanging out one of the windows. I was inspired by this building in Tonopah, NV:




The air conditioner I modeled is meant to be older and has a simpler design. It will also function as a vent for the structure, to equalize the interior air pressure and prevent build up of humidity:




Here's how it turned out. I still have to add the glass:








I had wanted to paint the AC a color other than white, and this yellowish-tan was the only thing I had on hand. I'm not sure it's the best choice but it'll do. Adding the bird poop, rust and grime was fun.

.

slateworks
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Superbly done Ray and it's getting more and more difficult to distinguish between model and reality. I think it's only the odd thumb end that convinces me you're not just out there taking more photos in Tonopah.

Doug::2t:

Rod Hutchinson
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The grunge on the air conditioner is beautiful.

Rod in Oz.

Rod Hutchinson
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The grunge on the air conditioner is beautiful.

Rod in Oz.

Bernd
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:thumb::thumb::thumb::thumb::thumb:

pipopak
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The grunge on the air conditioner is beautiful.

Rod in Oz.

Disgustingly real.... Jose.

Lost Creek RR
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Very cool
Rod.

Ray Dunakin
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Thanks.

There's actually a couple things I need to fix, that I didn't notice until after I'd looked at the close up photos for a while.

W C Greene
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Gets gooder & gooder. Ain't enough moosies for this one.

Woodie

dennischee
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probably end up with legionnaires disease, lol

Great realistic work

Dennis:moose::moose::moose::moose::moose::moose::moose::moose:

Ray Dunakin
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More progress... I'm finally getting to the fun part: painting!

I started by coating the exterior of the building with the same concrete-colored exterior latex paint that I used on my previous building:




Then I made a couple small, flat stamps out of scraps of Sintra PVC. The larger one is about .5" x 1.75". The smaller one is about 5/8" long and less than an half inch wide:




I used a paint brush to apply a thin layer of paint to the face of the stamp. Then I press it down onto the brick surface. The paint sticks to the raised face of the bricks, defining their shape. The smaller stamp was used to get into narrow places:






Obviously it doesn't cover everything, especially on the "decayed" bricks, and so there is a lot of touching up that has to be done using a fine brush. Still, it beats painting each brick one by one.

Here's a close up shot of the bricks after touching up:




The upper portion of the side walls has a small section of bricks which will be visible above the adjoining buildings. As you may recall, I had used automotive spot putty to smooth the joints, which caused problems when I tried to scribe the lines using the custom tools I made. What I ended up doing was using a carbide tipped metal scribe, and going over it fairly lightly to avoid crumbling the putty. The photo below shows how it turned out. It's not great but it'll do. It'll look better after I touch up the paint in the mortar lines do a few other little things:




Here are a couple shots of the building in progress, setting on the foundation:






More to come... Enjoy!

Last edited on Sun Oct 13th, 2013 11:51 pm by Ray Dunakin

Bernd
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Ray,

That's some good looking brick work. Can't wait to see the next installment.

And speaking of bricks, I was out laying some 1:1 on the house. Almost done.

Bernd

Lost Creek RR
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Holy Toledo that looks awesome, great looking brick work.
Rod.

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Superb Ray and I can't see why you're concerned about the side bricks. All blends in very well.

Doug

W C Greene
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You are ALWAYS your own worst nitpicker.

Woodie

Ray Dunakin
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Made some more progress, and in interesting turn of events...

I wanted to have some very old, worn and faded signs on the building. But first, I felt that a lot of the mortar lines were too deep, especially where the signs would be. So after experimenting on a test piece, I discovered that my concrete colored latex paint could be mixed with DAP "Dynaflex 230" paintable sealant, which I then rubbed into the grooves. I had to do small sections at a time, quickly washing off the excess with a damp cloth and a paper towel. This worked extremely well, much better then when I had tried it with paint only. So I may have to reconsider my whole approach before I create my next brick building. Anyway, here's how it turned out:




I masked off the area for the signs, and painted in the background color. I dabbed the paint on using a piece of gray foam from a cheap foam paintbrush. Then I used a fine-tipped brush to hand-paint some blotches of solid color, and also to blend in some tints. In this photo you can also see where I experimented with some hand-painted chipping. It looked good so I stopped there. The chipping really needed to be done after the lettering was added:




The lettering was printed out on self-adhesive vinyl. You can find inkjet printable vinyl on ebay. I cut out the letters and positioned the mask onto the building. I tried using the foam to apply the paint but it couldn't get down near the edges of the mask, so I ended up stippling it with an old, small brush.

After removing the mask, I used a fine brush to add some lighter shades of gray. Then I added the chipping, again painting it by hand with a fine point brush:





And here are some close ups of the smaller, vertical signs:














The windows and doors were temporarily inserted in the structure. I still have to finish painting the door and add glass to the windows. I also need to paint the stone walls on the sides of the building, paint the roof and add smokejacks, etc. Then I'll do some weathering on the overall structure. But currently I'm deciding whether I want to add any more signs.






That's it for now, more later. Enjoy!

.

Bernd
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:shocked: :shocked: WOW :shocked::shocked:
:2t: :2t: :2t: :2t: :2t: :2t: :2t: :2t:

Lost Creek RR
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Superb
Rod.

Ray Dunakin
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It's been quite a while since I posted an update on this project. The building itself is on hold for a bit... I threw my hip out somehow, and for a while if I sat down for more than a few minutes, I would have difficulty walking. Fortunately I just needed to exercise it a bit, so I started doing some work outdoors on the layout and in a few days I was back to normal. But by then I'd gotten so involved with the layout that I stayed with it and haven't done much model-making!

Anyway, I thought I'd show you what I've been up to. It's not as "glamorous" as making models and it's certainly not finescale, but it might be of some interest...

In the town of Dos Manos, the foundation for the buildings was incomplete, and I was running out of space for more buildings. So I began extending the foundation. I had to dig out a little of the slope behind the town, up to the base of the trestle. I built forms out of foam core art board and hot glue, and poured in the high-strength mortar:






I still need to do a little more work on the end of the foundation. I also need to extend the road. I'm going to make it curve down into the canyon. It won't actually go anywhere but at least it will look like it does.


In the town of Mineral Ridge, where the brick building will be, I added foundations for a fourth and fifth building:






Then I put in a pad and foundation for the future Mineral Ridge depot and boarding area:




Next I started building a foundation for a mill:







I still have to add a bit more to the top level of the foundation. Here's a simple drawing to give you a rough idea of how the mill building will look, and how it will fit into the scene:




Eventually there will be a mine tram on the rock wall above the town. It will cross a bridge over the sloped road, to reach the ore dump at the top level of the mill.

Ray Dunakin
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This project has been on hold for a very long time. Because it was unfinished, I hadn't even given it a UV-protective coat, so I've been putting it outside only for photos or shows, and storing it indoors the rest of the time. Now I've finally got it "finished". Not quite completely finished, because eventually I will have to put in the lights, interior details, and window signs, etc. But for now it's done...

First off, way back in October I added the sheet metal flashing over the top of the brick wall. This was made from .010" shim brass, painted with zinc paint. I also added chimneys, one on each side wall:







Later the building was weathered, particularly the roof and window ledges.

More recently, I built the removable "drawers" for the interior. There are two, one for the ground floor, and one for the second floor. However, the second floor interior ended up being used only as a light block and to fill the space. (more on this later).

Anyway, here are some shots of the ground floor interior structure. Since this is supposed to be an old hardware store, I went with an unfinished style ceiling. The walls and floor are photographic textures printed onto self-adhesive vinyl and "weathered" slightly with thin washes of craft acrylics. I still need to add a door to the rear wall. This is all I'm doing on the interior for now, but later it will be fully detailed and lighted :










Already the exterior looks better with the interior installed. I also finished painting the doors, installing glass, and adding the door knobs. The key plates/door knobs are scratch built from styrene, because I wanted something a little fancier than usual:






The second story windows are blocked, which is why I didn't do anything with the interior there. Two of the windows have old sheets loosely draped across them. These were made from thin silk cloth. For each piece, I glued the upper corners to a brass rod, then coated the material liberally with artist's acrylic matte medium and hung it up to dry. Once dry, they were painted off-white. BTW, note the bird poop on the window ledges:






The third window was already partially blocked by the air conditioner. I covered the upper sash with "old cardboard". To create this effect, I found a photo online of a vintage cardboard box and used it to make a photographic texture. This was printed onto self-adhesive vinyl, retouched with craft acrylics, and applied to a thin brass sheet:






Here are some shots of the completed structure:






And a nice view up the sidewalk:




.

Alwin
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Wow, how realistic is that! :shocked: That's some superb modeling Ray. Keep it coming. :2t:

Alwin

slateworks
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I have to say Ray, if it wasn't that I knew this to be a model, I would swear it was real and life size. Your work is exceptional. My one regret is not being able to see it in the flesh.

Doug

Herb Kephart
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Seems to me to be a shame to create a building with that much detail, and then leave it out in the sun and weather.

Great job!


Herb

rmontgomery
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Ray,

Have you got a picture showing how you did the interior "drawers" ?

thanks

Ray Montgomery

Ray Dunakin
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The interiors are just simple boxes that slide in from the rear, then the rear wall is secured with screws. I have some better photos of the interiors that I did for the stone bank building, starting here:

http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_1.html#145

rmontgomery
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Thanks, the interior drawer looks like a good idea.

Daniel Osvaldo Caso
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Excellent thread and great work.

I posted the link to the NGRM Forum.

Daniel

Ray Dunakin
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Thanks Daniel!

Ray Dunakin
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I'm finally making progress on this again, after taking a short break.

About a year ago I found a sheet of 13mm Sintra in the cutoff bin at a local plastics dealer, and I've been holding onto it ever since. I decided to use this to make the arched walls of the passenger waiting area. I don't know if it's because this stuff was old, or what, but it was quite a bit harder than the 6mm stuff I've been using, and was kind of a pain to work with. I had to use a jigsaw to cut it. I also found it more difficult to scribe. It might have been easier if I'd just laminated two sheets of 6mm Sintra together, to get the required thickness. Anyway...

After cutting it out, I taped the plugs from the arches in place temporarily, to hold a pushpin marking the center of the arch. Then I scribed the stones around the arch, using a small metal ruler as a guide:




When I'd finished scribing the stones on the face of the wall, I used a special tool to continue the mortar lines around the corners onto the edges of the arches. This was just an X-Acto knife, with the edge of the blade ground flat:






Here is the exterior side of the wall. It is complete except for some details that will be added after assembly. As you can see, I have changed the shape of the wall's top edge from the original design:




Here's the interior side of the same wall. When I shot this photo, I still had to scribe a few more lines near the top. On the left end, there was no need to include all the scribing since that is where the adjoining wall will be glued to this one:




That's all for now. I still have two more walls to do for this part of the depot.

NevadaBlue
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Rather like using real stone slabs? Maybe a hammer and chisel would be useful.
Nice work Ray, I'm always watching this one.

Ray Dunakin
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Oops, I just realized I posted that update in the wrong thread. It's supposed to be in the Dos Manos depot thread.

Last edited on Tue Nov 17th, 2015 12:59 am by Ray Dunakin


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