Freerails Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Scratchbuilding & Kitbashing > Mineral Ridge Mill - 'In-ko-pah R.R.'

Freerails IS ACCEPTING new Members ... To join Freerails ... See how to Register as a Member in the 'Joining Freerails' Forum

Mineral Ridge Mill - 'In-ko-pah R.R.'
 Moderated by: . Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  Next Page Last Page  
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Tue Mar 4th, 2014 11:51 pm
  PMQuoteReply
11th Post
Ray Dunakin
Registered
 

Joined: Wed Jul 25th, 2012
Location: San Diego
Posts: 1243
Status: 
Offline
Time for another progress report... Mostly I've been making corrugated metal sheets and gluing them to the structure.

At first I used Loctite Pro Line Premium construction adhesive, a thick, gooey, polyurethane glue. This would have provided a very strong and durable bond, however there were some issues.

One, despite being thick and gooey, it didn't grip enough to hold the corrugated panels flat prior to curing. This meant only a few panels could be applied at a time, which then had to be pressed down with weight until the glue cured -- and if it wasn't very level, the panels and weights would slide off. (I found this out the hard way.) The other issue was that excess glue was difficult to clean off and tended to stick to everything, including the weights.

So I switched to using DAP Dynaflex 230, a paintable, weatherproof sealant. I've never used it to attach brass to plastic before, but I have used it for several other applications outdoors and haven't had any trouble with it. So I think it will hold just fine, and is definitely not going to decay or deteriorate due sun or weather. It's gummy enough hold the panels flat without weights, and excess material cleans off easily with a damp rag.

On February 22 we hosted our club's monthly meeting/open house, so the mill was on display despite being far from completion:




Since then I have gotten a lot more of the corrugated metal panels installed. The rear of the structure is mostly hidden by the cliff, so I only put the metal panels on where they would be most likely to show:




Currently the walls of the main structure are finished, with only two sections of roof left to cover:






Here are a couple closer shots:





One small issue with this adhesive is that it air dries, and since the brass and the PVC substructure are both non-porous, the stuff in the middle of each panel remains soft for several days. Until it becomes firm, the structure must be handled carefully to avoid crushing the corrugated ridges.

The window frames have only been put into place to give an idea of how it'll look. They aren't painted or glazed yet and won't be permanently installed until after the structure has been painted.

That's all for now, enjoy!

.



____________________
Visit http://www.raydunakin.com to see photos of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
Back To Top

 Posted: Wed Mar 5th, 2014 02:35 am
  PMQuoteReply
12th Post
Ray Dunakin
Registered
 

Joined: Wed Jul 25th, 2012
Location: San Diego
Posts: 1243
Status: 
Offline
slateworks wrote:
Ray, how did you distress the window frame - and without breaking the smaller parts? Wire brush?

Oops, somehow I missed this when it was posted.

I use a homemade woodgraining tool, which is just a 1/4" wide piece cut from a fine-toothed razor saw and inserted into the handle of a hobby knife. (In some areas of the window frame it was easier to just use the razor saw itself.)

Then I add cracks using a "panel scriber", which is a really great little tool sold by Bare Metal Foil & Hobby Co.



____________________
Visit http://www.raydunakin.com to see photos of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Mar 6th, 2014 12:32 pm
  PMQuoteReply
13th Post
slateworks
Registered


Joined: Wed Oct 6th, 2010
Location: Twickenham, United Kingdom
Posts: 948
Status: 
Offline
Thanks Ray. The panel scriber looks a little like a curved ended dental scribe which I happen to have but I hadn't thought to use a piece of razor saw blade in the way you describe. I shall give it a go.

Doug



____________________


Doug
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Mar 6th, 2014 12:58 pm
  PMQuoteReply
14th Post
pipopak
Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 13th, 2011
Location: Florida USA
Posts: 2047
Status: 
Offline
You can buy cheap dentist tools replicas (perfectly good for modelling) at Harbor Freight. Jose.



____________________
Junk is something you throw away three weeks before you need it.
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Mar 7th, 2014 07:45 pm
  PMQuoteReply
15th Post
Salada
Registered


Joined: Mon Nov 4th, 2013
Location:  
Posts: 1190
Status: 
Offline
Looks like it's coming on well Ray. The 'variegated' finish on your corrugated sheets is beginning to show up nicely.

Did they have headgear 'flag-topping' ceremonies in the US Western States on the first day that a new mine was put into production ?.

Regards                     Michael

Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Mar 7th, 2014 08:50 pm
  PMQuoteReply
16th Post
dennischee
Registered


Joined: Thu Aug 30th, 2012
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 322
Status: 
Offline
Have to agree with Michael the variegated finish is very effective
Dennis

Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Mar 7th, 2014 10:43 pm
  PMQuoteReply
17th Post
Ray Dunakin
Registered
 

Joined: Wed Jul 25th, 2012
Location: San Diego
Posts: 1243
Status: 
Offline
Thanks. The corrugated sheets are brass, but they'll be painted to look like galvanized steel.

I dont know about the "flag-topping" ceremony. I have seen a few large headframes with flags but not many.



____________________
Visit http://www.raydunakin.com to see photos of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
Back To Top

 Posted: Sat Mar 8th, 2014 10:56 pm
  PMQuoteReply
18th Post
Lost Creek RR
Registered
 

Joined: Sat Dec 31st, 2011
Location: Wantirna, Australia
Posts: 308
Status: 
Offline
As usual outstanding work Ray.
Rod.

Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Mar 9th, 2014 03:54 pm
  PMQuoteReply
19th Post
W C Greene
Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Royse City, Texas USA
Posts: 8132
Status: 
Offline
Real materials in real scenery. Can't get any better than that! I really love your lighting, Ray. Who's system do you use?? LOL

Woodie



____________________
It doesn't matter if you win or lose, its' how you rig the game.
Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Mar 9th, 2014 08:26 pm
  PMQuoteReply
20th Post
Ray Dunakin
Registered
 

Joined: Wed Jul 25th, 2012
Location: San Diego
Posts: 1243
Status: 
Offline
After applying all the corrugated metal and giving it at least a couple days or more for the adhesive to dry, I washed it off to remove oily fingerprints, etc. As before, I sprayed it with oven cleaner, then rinsed it.

When it was dry I primed it with Rustoleum's "self-etching" primer. Then I gave it two coats of Rustoleum's "Cold Galvanizing Compound". Here's how it looks so far:








Still to come: Weathering the structure, adding exterior details, painting and installing the windows, etc. I also haven't built the sorting house yet, which goes on top of the ore bin.

.



____________________
Visit http://www.raydunakin.com to see photos of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
Back To Top


 Current time is 09:25 am
Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  Next Page Last Page  

Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Scratchbuilding & Kitbashing > Mineral Ridge Mill - 'In-ko-pah R.R.'
Top



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems