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Mineral Ridge Mill - 'In-ko-pah R.R.'
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 Posted: Sat Apr 5th, 2014 02:24 pm
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Si.
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Great work Ray !

Love all the diagonals ... nice challenge.

The Ops. shots look fab ...

... must be a blast, running a mixed through the mountains !

All the best.

Cheers

Si.



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 Posted: Thu May 1st, 2014 05:23 pm
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Ray Dunakin
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Time for another update on this project...

I glued the corrugated metal to the sorting house, starting with the roof:






Then I did the walls:




I painted the roof, including the interior. The interior of the roof will only be minimally visible, and in shadow, so it got a really sloppy, crude paint job -- something with just enough variegation to give the impression of old wood:




The exterior was painted, and the roof received some rusty streaks. I still need to do a bit more weathering of the roof, and haven't yet weathered the sides:





Meanwhile, the main part of the mill has been sitting outside on the layout for a while. As a result, I found that the two sloped sections of roof were not sufficiently braced, and warped in the hot sun. Straightening them out without damaging the corrugated metal was a little tricky. I had to heat the underside with a torch to soften the PVC slightly, then lay it fly with a couple bricks on it. Once that was done I added some heavy bracing, and then painted the underside of each roof:




Then I weathered them with some subtle streaks and a few rusty spots:




I also weathered the peaked roof on the lowest level of the mill:




Now I'm working on the doors and windows, which are from Grandt Line. Since they need to look old and heavily weathered, I scribed some wood grain and a few small cracks into them. Then they were given a light coat of white primer. Next I painted them with a light, grayish brown latex house paint, thinned with water:




This was followed with a few very thin washes of medium brown and dark brown craft acrylics:








The final step was to give them traces of old, peeled paint. This effect was achieved by coating each piece with Testor's enamel thinner. While this was still wet, I lightly brushed on some green, craft acrylic:










Next will be the "fun" part -- cutting glass to fit all the windows.

.



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 Posted: Thu May 1st, 2014 11:31 pm
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dennischee
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Looking good Ray like the window frames, might try that on a cottage I'm building

Dennis:apl::apl::apl::apl:

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 Posted: Thu May 1st, 2014 11:33 pm
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Lost Creek RR
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Looking better day by day Ray. I really like the window treatment. Do your buildings receive natural weathering whilst outside? If they were here in Melbourne I'm not sure how they would stand up in our climate.
Keep up the excellent work.
Rod.

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 Posted: Fri May 2nd, 2014 12:14 am
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Ray Dunakin
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Thanks guys!

I try to avoid natural weathering as much as possible, since it is never to scale and always destructive. Almost everything gets a coat of Krylon UV resistant matte clear for protection from the sun.

There are a couple exceptions to this rule. The Rustoleum Cold Galvanizing compound, used on the corrugated metal, is left as-is. It's meant for outdoor use and does react well to the weather. Same with Sophisticated Finish's "Rust", a product I sometimes use for heavy rust effects.



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 Posted: Fri May 2nd, 2014 09:56 pm
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Alwin
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Ray, looking good. Maybe the photo's are not detailed enough but isn't the effect a bit gone of the etching of the sheets after the paintjob?
I like the paintjob better than the etched sheets but it seems like the etching was a bit a waste of time. But I could be wrong .

Alwin

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 Posted: Fri May 2nd, 2014 11:28 pm
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Ray Dunakin
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Alwin, if you're referring to the embossed corrugations, they do show up very well after painting. Next update, I'll try to include a good closeup shot.



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 Posted: Sat May 3rd, 2014 12:16 am
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Ray Dunakin
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BTW, something I forgot to mention... some kind soul had an order of corrugated metal sent to me, anonymously, from Rainbow Ridge. However, by that time I'd already sheathed everything except the sorting house, so I decided to stick with the handmade stuff and save the Rainbow Ridge material for another structure.



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 Posted: Sat May 3rd, 2014 08:00 pm
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Alwin
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Ray,

I was referring to the oven cleaner. You described it in post 5. The embossing is visible very well.

Alwin

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 Posted: Sat May 3rd, 2014 11:22 pm
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Ray Dunakin
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Oh, I see. The oven cleaner is just to give the surface a bit of "tooth", so the paint will stick to it better. It only etches the surface very slightly, not enough to be visible prior to painting.



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