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foam over benchwork
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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 11:23 pm
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smokebox
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HIYA...

Anyone use a sheet of foam over their benchwork?
What I need to know is did you put it "directly" on top or set it into the outside of the benchwork?
I'm thinking of just setting it right on top then using the fasica as the edge of the layout..

Any ideads or input??

Thanks Rob

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 11:53 pm
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Milocomarty
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Used foam as benchwork in a couple of HO modules, although it was fitted in a birch plywood module..



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Regards Martin
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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 06:31 am
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Paladin
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My layout is 30mm styrene foam insulation board (Green) which is laid directly over a partical board base. Total size of layout is 20 x 20 feet.  On30.

Found it very easy to lay track directly and really simple to instal turnouts. Track is simply glued in location with a PVA glue. It also has a good sound insulation. Need to run a wire under the track not a problem just poke it through. Need to shift track simply slide a pallet knife under track and lift up.The PVA glue is not very strong thus easy to modify things.

 Having pointed out a couple of good points the downside is it easy to damage and dent. Needs a little care when working on it. If you are going to need alot of foam sheeting it is not cheap.

Having said that, I would NOT build another layout with the foam base. It is not durable for the long haul and I fear, only takes somebody to lean on it and you will have a dent.

I suppose its horses for courses, Smaller layouts - Portable layouts - Stack and store layouts. its likely not to be a bad choice. My layout thats been a couple of years in construction is already showing signs of wear and tear and I have just started on scenery

I will say again its great to work with but not sure its good for the long haul, time will tell. There again like most model railroaders I will more than likely rip it all up and do another layout for no other reason than its what model railroaders do.

Don




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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 03:12 pm
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jtrain
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Foam works great for me, and it's become my scenery base of choice. The method I've decided to go with, is an open frame of dimensional lumber or plywood strips with foam glued to the top. Later, I add the fascia after most of the scenery has been completed. Liquid nails works great for foam, although I'm finding that most wood glues, if given time to dry, will hold foam just as well. Whatever you do, don't go with the white foam, it makes a mess, isn't that strong, and many adhesives will eat away at it. Go with pink, blue, or green instead; much better materials.

Good luck with the layout and I can't wait to see photos of your progress.

--James:java:



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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 05:00 pm
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smokebox
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HIYA..

For a long time I have wanted to model big electric freights like the Milwaukee Road and Virginian and well, I rent so having a huge basement is out of my price range.
For the layout I have decided to go with is not my idea at all, it came straight out of 103 Realistic trackplans which was published by MR winter 2014.
I'm just turning it into an electric railway.
The plan is for a 9x11 foot double level and is called the Norfolk &Westerns Abingdon Branch which follows the " Virginia Creeper "
The majority of my equipment is interurban style and the biggest motor I have is a South Shore steeplecab, although I am working through kitbashing 4 C-C ( the C denotes a 3 axle truck) electrics by chopping up some GG-1 's.
So getting back on topic, I thought about dimensional lumber with foam right on top, to protect the foam and scenery the fasica will follow right Up to the top, the outside will have protection from
bumps.
I would think a 1x1 grid would be strong enough as long as I don't set a growler on beer on the layout!!

Thanks,

Smokebox

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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 07:28 pm
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Milocomarty
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Uses the 2" foam on 4' modules, stuck between the back and facia, and the 2 ends, only divided by 2 ribs..sturdy as hell we do lotta shows with them..



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 Posted: Sun Jun 14th, 2015 10:52 pm
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Anne O
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Once made my layout entirely from foam - Used two thicknesses of 2" urethane insulation (sicky yellow with foil on both sides) laminated with construction adhesive. The legs were Sonotubes, and the scenery above was blue polystyrene foam insulation (the usual stuff). Excellent choice. Haven't had a regular built into room layout since, but I'm about to, and will probably use the same again. Not a bit of wood in the layout.

Fascia was an expensive 'bender board' , expensive stuff bought surplus, cheap.

Last edited on Sun Jun 14th, 2015 10:55 pm by Anne O

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