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pipopak
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... nice colours!. Jose.

Robert Comerford
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Another go.

Here it is at the start






Here it is a short time later.  :>;)




regards
Bob

Herb Kephart
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Well Bob, you solved one of the biggest (to me, and others of my vintage) detriments to outdoor railroads by building up off the ground--minimizing bending over!

What is the gray sub-roadbed material?  Looks to be bendable, and yet sufficiently rigid to span fair distances between supports. Another good move IMHO, is to have a lead into the shed so that you don't have to handle the equipment at the start and end of each operating session. 

Keep us ''in the loop'' (N. American pun)


Herb

Robert Comerford
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Hi Herb, I finally remembered I had promised you I would post some of my work here.

The base structure is steel C section. A friend cut and welded sections up for me as a favour for teaching him to fly r/c. I had suggested octagonal but he was keen to see a smooth curve. Basically the frame is his work, I just did what I was told.
The baseboard top is a fibrous sheet usually used here for lining bathrooms.

I have followed the lead of other O gauge modellers here who have had layouts up at table height outdoors for many years. Certainly easier on the back and the layout stays cleaner as the wind blows most leaves off down to ground level.

regards
Bob Comerford

Robert Comerford
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Here is a closeup of the method used to switch the frog polarity.
The trackwork is Peco code 124. Not in any way correct for NSWGR but outdoors... who cares? It has the advantage of not requiring me to lay thousands of oversized matches and is the only brand of plastic O gauge track with proven ability to handle the UV levels in the Australian sun.




I have of course bonded the closure and point rails to the stock rails.

Operation is by DCC using radio control throttles. A while back I had to make a decision. I ran the layout for a while with both battery/radio and DCC. Track power won the day as I like to mainly sit and watch trains and I get to keep my sound decoders. Over the last summer I have not cleaned locomotive wheels and the only track cleaning has been to remove some bird poo once or twice. I use powdered graphite as a spark suppressant/ contact improver and if there is any sign of hesitation I just paint a little mixed with kerosene onto a couple of inches of  track and let the wheels do the rest. I have saved myself hours of mucking about with battery charging. The ideal for me would be a combination of both methods, direct radio DCC, enough onboard battery (using the batteries of my choice) to prevent stalled locos and do away with point wiring and with charging through the track. Commercially it is under way but is not there yet for me.

regards
 Bob

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I may try the kero and graphite trick, I'm fed up with cleaning track and overhead.

Robert Comerford
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Hi Trev, you must have more patience than me. I decided long ago that any more overhead would be dummy and I would run my electric stock as 2-rail. All that fun of watching the overhead spark means lots more cleaning I noticed.

Gordon didn't exist when I lived in Canberra. Those were the days when we could go skinny dipping at Kambah Pool and Pine Island. :>)
regards
Bob

Robert Comerford
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Most of my stock is home made..... cardboard, scrap wood from my r/c plane bin, tie wire, styrene etc. I buy my wheels mainly from Slaters as there is no local supplier (or more correctly the only one is in his 90's) so I chose to use BRMSB/GOG standards by default.
Gearboxes are from Roxey Moldings and bogies and axleguards are from a variety of suppliers both local and overseas. Some of my locos have modified HO mechs.

There are a few 7mm finescale NSWGR items for sale these days but my budget won't allow me to wander in that direction very often.  Prices reflect the small potential market.

The Hunter Valley had a sea of 4 wheel coal hoppers that lasted into the 1980's. As a kid I would be fascinated by the long rakes of these wagons being hauled behind ancient steam engines on yearly train trips to the city.

I am making a rake of 12 (to start) to run. Their shades of red and light grey should add a bit of colour as the government stock was basically 50 shades of (dark) grey. Here is a photo of part of the production line.



My usual method of compensation will not fit this type of wagon so I am making use of some sprues from Parkside Dundas which have axleboxes that slide up and down in the W irons.

Info on the real thing can be found here.
http://fourwheelsnoaircoal.blogspot.com.au/2009/05/hunter-valley-coal-wagons.html

regards
 Bob

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Hi Bob

Very impressed with that sub-bed frame work, I know your modelling o gauge but shall show to some of my large scale live steamer friends.

Cheers Dan

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Nice work!

Robert Comerford
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Thanks fellas, I know it is not large scale but there is no O gauge folder here. However the method used could indeed support those scales used with gauge one track or even gauge 2 or 3.

The supports for the cross braces is steel sheet with folded edges for strength. It helps to have another mate who is a plumber. :>;)
Wood could be used instead.


regards
 Bob

Robert Comerford
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Here is a critter made on the cheap. It is a NSWGR X200 class rail tractor designed for one man operation within yard limits.
The model is made from scrap ply, paper clips, pc board, tin can, plastic bits, an old Hornby HO GM mech (that was on the way to the tip before I grabbed it) and Slaters rolling stock wheels.



It shunts around quite happily outdoors.

regards
 Bob

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Here's how I made a passenger rake. A mail train similar to what I travelled in for many years.




Several layers of cardboard, shaped wood pieces and some brass strip.

regards
 Bob

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Ingenuity at its finest Bob!

Bob D.

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:glad::glad::glad::moose::moose::moose::moose::rah::rah::rah::2t:

Herb Kephart
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Really like to see scratch-building, in any material. And yes, I've used card a lot over the years. Some of my (less than spectacular) efforts from over 60 years ago, done with card, --shredded wheat cereal boxes--which where always in supply in the Kephart household--are no longer used on the layout, but are holding up just fine because they were well sealed with paint---model airplane ''dope'' in some cases. Many dismiss card as unsuitable, but they are wrong.

So carry on, Mate, and goodonya!

Please keep the photos coming

Herb

Robert Comerford
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I lashed out and purchased the cardboard rather than waiting for more cereal packet. :>;)
Many of the ventilators are ferrules from broken guitar strings and the bogies are old 3-rail era castings 2-railed. Most detail is wood and card.

Here is one closer to the finish. Buffers are thumb tacks and plastic.




Fortunately I was able to replace my dodgy signage with some decals later on . Hands are not steady enough these days.
regards
Bob

Last edited on Tue Apr 21st, 2015 06:38 am by Robert Comerford

Robert Comerford
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Just a thought, anybody casually scanning this forum would be forgiven for thinking there is no O gauge to be seen here and move on if that is what they are looking for.
If there is a limit to the number of folders available why not rename the On30 folder "O scale" and move the O gauge content to it. There is after all 3 narrow gauge folders here (4 if you consider most large scale is narrow gauge not standard gauge on gauge one track).

regards
Bob

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Hi Robert,
Boy did that bring back memories of my younger days. Nice work mate

Dennis
:apl::apl::apl::apl:

Robert Comerford
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thanks Dennis

Robert Comerford
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Here are some pics of the progress with the private coal train I am building.

The first shows the addition of discarded toy market dunny seat couplers for the intermediate connections.  Kadees are at each end of the rake but neither are correct as they were hook coupled.




The second shows the pile of styrene further advanced





It will be good to see them running, however they used distinctive brake vans, the wagons being unbraked, so a couple of them might be the next project. These wagons were used on mines close to the coast so the grades were slight, braking was done by the loco and 1 or 2 brake vans at the rear plus the setting of a certain number of yard brakes on the wagons while running down hill.  They originally fueled much of the west coast of the USA during the gold rush.

regards
 Bob

Robert Comerford
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After a bit more work the collection of styrene sheet is looking more and more like a coal train.
Being ANZAC day here I took this photo after returning from the dawn service.




The public often would refer to them as 'alphabet hoppers' due to the mine identifying letters on the sides. The lettering is done with a shaky hand.
Only  time will tell if 12 was enough :>;)

regards
 Bob

Bob D
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Bob, What exactly do the letters represent?

Looks like you had a good time building them.

Bob D.

Robert Comerford
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Bob D wrote: Bob, What exactly do the letters represent?

Looks like you had a good time building them.

Bob D.

Hi Bob ,the letters identify the mine that the load came from and in conjunction with the number and  some other letters told the operators at the unloading site the coal capacity of the wagon. 
e.g. A stood for Aberdare, B for J&A Brown, CC for Caledonia, H for Hebburn  etc.
By the time I am modelling almost all mines were under one or two companies.
The coal companies in the Hunter Valley used crane unloading in the river initially so the usual coal hopper that emptied to the side above a ship at a jetty wasn't ideal.
One company came up with the removable bin with a bottom hatch and had them initially made in the UK. Of course such an idea is hard to keep secret so they were suddenly appearing in other places. :>;)

Here is a more in-depth explanation.

http://fourwheelsnoaircoal.blogspot.com.au/2009/05/hunter-valley-coal-wagons.html

regards
Bob


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I love it when someone can take a bunch of nothing and make something cool out of it all. Keep making cool stuff 😁

Bob D
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Interesting. Were the planks on the ends removable in order to get the coal out or did they have to shovel out the contents over the sides? I find it fascinating how engineers determine when it's necessary to use different materials like wood instead of steel.

Bob D.

Robert Comerford
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Bob D wrote: Interesting. Were the planks on the ends removable in order to get the coal out or did they have to shovel out the contents over the sides? I find it fascinating how engineers determine when it's necessary to use different materials like wood instead of steel.

Bob D.

Bob, the bottom was hinged and a pin pulled to release the contents over the hold of the ship.

Thanks George


Bob

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Although not quite finished I decided to get them out and have a play.







13000 -12....that's how many to go??  :>;)

Some video here.
Trainsinshed

regards
 Bob

Robert Comerford
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When I first started this project I decided to build as my first steamer a small 1880's tank engine. Some of these had lasted in the 1960's as dock shunters and in private use. For a time they were fitted with cranes.
I had promised myself I would scratchbuild one decades before in HO. However it never happened so I decided to keep that promise in O gauge.

Here is the start.




And here it is with some friends.
The other tank is an even older design that we bought a few of. It was a copy of a British one and this British kit was assembled and was at a price I could not refuse even though it was not really wanted. :>;)
It was 3-rail when I bought it and had been masquerading as a 1/4" scale 18 class on an outdoor railway. An hours work and the skate and other wiring were removed and it was running under DCC and back to being a 7mm scale model.




regards
 Bob

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Here is the 48 class AlCo as it was once. I cheated here a bit and used a fairly basic fibreglass body casting supplied by a friend.

Cut out the holes and fill in the missing bits. :>;)
It is sitting on home made styrene bogies using Roxey 40" diesel wheels from the UK.

regards
 Bob

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Robert,

I am glad to find you posting here. I have been following your blog Trains in Shed for a while. I am in O scale also. And am interested in buiding a similar out door layout to what you have built. You are providing lots of inspiration. Thanks.

Phil Randall
In Texas

Robert Comerford
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Thanks Phil, glad to hear my postings have perhaps been of some help.
With Autumn well and truly here , the height of the baseboards has again proved to be useful. Most of the leaves get blown off the baseboards after they land and end up down on the ground.
Look forward to seeing your progress.  Do you have a particular railroad/era for your proposed layout or just plan to use what is available?

regards
 Bob

Robert Comerford
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Here is a shot of a critter and very early van.
The loco is made of plywood and was one of several small shunters to be used by a 'driver only' in remote yards and around workshops. O gauge wheels in a HO GM mech.
The van is styrene and was built to make use of some axleguards and wheels donated by a friend. I had to go way back to find a prototype to use the items.



regards
 Bob

Robert Comerford
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Here is a photo showing a shunting layout under construction in the garage some years ago. It occupies what is now the storage yards. The track is constructed from discarded code 100. O gauge track need not be expensive!
Both AMRA and NMRA profile wheels ran over it.



regards
 Bob

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Robert Comerford wrote:

Look forward to seeing your progress.  Do you have a particular railroad/era for your proposed layout or just plan to use what is available?

regards
 Bob


Bob,

I am interested in 1905-1925 American short line railroads. But I also like some newer equipment also. I am into electric traction railways and plan a layout for that in my shed. The plan is for the outdoor dog bone loop to enter the shed and to have a storage yard inside the shed at a lower level than the traction layout. The outdoor portion will be mainly to sit and watch trains roll by. I may have some switching also though. I do see myself buiding models of different steam locos that I fancy from throughout the world and running these. So I am not stuck on one single prototype at this time.

Phil Randall

Robert Comerford
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Apart from having the indoor layout your proposal does sound very much like mine Phil. I too just sit outside and railfan with a book and coffee at hand. I have had both US and British prototype trains sharing the rails at times.

On the rare occasion I get someone who likes to switch, the yard does get used. I can act as dispatcher from the shed. There are a couple of industries planned for the future. They will be glued as outriders to the existing boards.
Having an indoor section is a good idea, particularly for times when running outside is not possible. Traction can be quite convincing without taking up too much room. The late Bob Hegge was an inspiration in that line.

No matter how I try to rearrange it I can't make room for an indoor operating section at the moment. One day I will have a spare room in the house and it will probably end up with a layout to run my HO (currently in storage) so that could provide the play room when running outdoors isn't suitable.

regards
Bob

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I decided to finally get started on a kit. It was part of the trade for my S gauge. It is a Ron Fox NSWGR 59 class. A mostly standard Baldwin product with stupid short tender they were forced to supply it with so as to fit on obsolete turntables. 
 A mixture of brass, aluminium and urethane castings. The Slaters wheels are my addition.




regards
 Bob

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59 class. Hmm that is a good looking loco.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/81028427@N04/8635274881/

Where do you purchase your Slaters drivers? I am looking into getting a set for an 0-8-0. Is there a good online place to order. Direct from Slaters?

Thanks,

Phil Randall

Last edited on Mon May 11th, 2015 02:55 am by Nortonville Phil

Robert Comerford
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Nortonville Phil wrote: 59 class. Hmm that is a good looking loco.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/81028427@N04/8635274881/

Where do you purchase your Slaters drivers? I am looking into getting a set for an 0-8-0. Is there a good online place to order. Direct from Slaters?

Thanks,

Phil Randall
Hi mate, I order direct from Slaters in the UK.
You will need a 0.05" allen key to tighten the nuts. Slaters have them as do most music shops ( they are used on Fender electric guitars).

You might want to look at what standards you are using for your point construction first. In case you don't know, Slaters finescale range has wheels that have a thinner tyre than the old NMRA standard  RP25/172 that is sort of what is fitted to 2-rail offerings in the US ( or at least all the ones I have come across over the years). The finescale wheel has a tyre width of 3.5mm and is designed for a BTB of about 29.2mm.
The current NMRA recommended profile is  RP25/145 which is in metric terms 3.68mm wide so isn't all that much wider.

I run both standards through the Peco points I have .  The US ones with their wider tyre actually run better as the finescale can dip into the frog gap sometimes. That said, I haven't had any real trouble.

The 59 is essentially a ww1 USRA design mike. Favoured here by both the loco crew and the fitters as good engines to work on. When tested however they did not have anywhere near the grunt the were supposed to have.

regards
 Bob




Bob D
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Nice kit Bob!

I don't see many kits in the US. Where I live we don't get many O scale shows but I'm told there's usually a bunch at them around the country. Hopefully I'll get to go to one soon.

Bob D.

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Hi Bob, I guess there is little in the way of kits now available in the US. I bought my last Walthers O scale catalogue in the 80's and I suspect most of those items are long gone. :>)
The market seems to be focused on the toy 3-rail buyer.

Like me, mail order might be the only option for you.

Thankfully there is Slaters in the UK.I can usually find a driver to do the job for most of our steamers and make my own kits.
NWSL and Intermountain can get you out of trouble when it comes to rolling stock and diesel wheels. Had I decided to do this layout in a post steam era theme I had seriously considered using 1/4" scale as I could have made use of Athearn bogies and did some cut and shut on some of the US diesels from Atlas.
Generally the guys modelling the 5'3" and 3'6" use 1/4"; only us standard gaugers mainly stick to 7mm.

Meanwhile it is back to some serious drilling, sawing and filing of aluminium for me.!

regards
Bob

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Hi Bob,
Good to see someone else making their rake of 4-wheel non-air coal hoppers in 1/43rd scale,

Here's some from the Illawarra with fixed hoppers under the screens at the bottom of the Corrimal Incline at the Bowral Narrow Gauge Convention over last Easter


They still need final painting and lettering for CCC (Corrimal Coal company) or SCC (Southern Coal Company), numbering and then weathering. What have you used for your lettering please?

As a 5 year old I used to watch ones like yours go past my front fence opposite Caledonia station, hauled by double headed SMR 10 class 2-8-2T's.

Here's an example of a full size one "parked" on the southern approaches to Muswellbrook

The white star handle on the left of the hopper is the handbrake. the extension of the hopper body below the frame and the flat bottom dump door are also pretty clear in this photo.

Nice job and looking forward to progress with your 59 class,

Robert Comerford
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Hi John, the Illawarra wagons look terrific. Are they wood?

My lettering is with shaky hand and paint brush. While it won't stand a close look it is fine as they roll past.
Some decals may be available from Peter at OAust and perhaps from Ted Freeman (teditor on railpage).

The fireman on a 38 was the one who got to shovel Muswellbrook coal. Hope they can manage to keep the exhibit in good nick.
regards
Bob

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Hi Bob,
The Illawarra wagons are heavy card hopper sides and frame with styrene T shapes and Waratah white metal W-irons (S-truck?), buffers and drawhooks.

Here is one in the raw


and the rather sad looking prototype

This photo clearly shows the drop door on this type of wagon.

Robert Comerford
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Card, a much under-rated material John. Do you soak them in shellac before painting and do you punch the semi-circular braces ?
Did Waratah start doing the S wagon type axleguards too, it has been a while since I looked at their site but at the time they only did the K wagon type? I cheated with mine and used one of the Parkside Dundas range from the UK as I wanted some flexibility in the chassis.

regards
Bob

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Hi Bob
The circular braces internal braces and external braces were laser cut on a separate sheet of card with a different thickness than the hopper sides. Styrene T for the side braces and styrene angle for the end bracing were fitted after the bodies were assembled.

The hopper bodies and chassis frame were done for us a special order by Models'n'More based out of Penrith.

Here is the chassis frame, notched for the W-irons


In reality the central cavity for the drawgear should be narrower, as in

but as it is buried under the hopper floor on the model..

From memory, the hoppers were just spray painted with a red primer. So far they have behaved themselves with no swelling or moisture pick-up being evident.

We are planning on using adhesive vinyl letters and numbers on ours.

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Sorry - Duplicate post- please delete if possible

Last edited on Fri May 15th, 2015 01:14 am by oztrainz

Robert Comerford
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OK John look forward to see them with the letters.

What do you have to pull them?

regards
Bob

Last edited on Fri May 15th, 2015 02:42 am by Robert Comerford

oztrainz
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Hi Bob,
This :bg:


Given that one of these ran at Catherine Hill Bay hauling coal and no-one has done an 0-6-0 side tank that looks like the 2 Yorkshire tanks that ran Corrimal or the ling boilered Stephenson #18 (now at Thirlmere), I figure that the Ixion Hudswell Clarke is a pretty good stand-in ;)

At present the standard gauge tracks are for scenic effect only, the real action is on the Incline itself. But in the future who knows?

Robert Comerford
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The Ixion locos have proved very useful for a lot of people.
I have seen a E17 done somewhere before. Might have been a major bash of a Lima 4F!
Given the E17 was a standard design it may be possible to find a kit in the UK if there were enough hours in the day to look through all the manufacturers lists :>)
regards
Bob

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Loving all the photos of everything so far.

Side note, I've heard a fair number of people say they use ATF (automatic transmission fluid) to keep wheels and track clean. Little here and there on the tracks and the wheels do the work.

I assume the track is clean to start with and this method just helps keep it that way.

Herb Kephart
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I used to use ATF, and it worked well. Marvel Mystery Oil (auto stores) worked better.

Now, with on board battery & radio control, I don't give a rats rectum how dirty the track is.

Buts that's just me---


Herb

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ATF is used by many. I have read it is what is the Railzip bottle.
When I went outside this time I decided to re-investigate the wheel/rail contact issue. I first used a variety of oils that I knew worked tolerably well.
I also ran battery/radio for a time.
In the end I went back to the method I have used indoors for some years.
I use powdered graphite mixed with a little kerosene. I just needed a bit more than for the indoor smaller scales.

If I see any sign of hesitation I put a few dabs on the track and let the train run over it. At the worst it might take a couple of laps to do the job and that's it. Might be several days before I need to do the same thing for another loco. Going from results outside with O gauge so far, I will probably give the loco wheels a clean when the pickups and bearings need oiling.
Keep in mind I regularly run a small 4 wheel diesel critter that I have made up a 'stay alive' pack for and so far I haven't found any need to install it.
I decided to have a shunt around the sidings after some months of disuse. On that occasion I gave them a clean with some fine wet and dry and then added a few spots of powdered graphite and no issues since.

Here is a loco that might be familiar to some.
Four were imported for shunting an armaments factory during WW2 before two got more mundane duties as carriage shunters at Central in Sydney.



regards
Bob

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The 59 class progresses.
This kit is probably what some would describe as more an aid to scratchbuilding these days. Methinks principally designed for the local 3-rail market.
I am having the chassis milled to get the height closer to scale and have been altering the tender truck stretchers to suit Slaters wheels and attempting to lower the overall height some too.

Here is pic, showing the mods and the tender part way soldered up. Rivets will be decals.


regards
 Bob

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Three cheers for scratchbuilders--I know you said that you started with a kit--but kitbashing to that extent is scratchbuilding in my book!

Herb

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Good stuff Bob, isn't it fun!!!

Has anyone here done a "how-to" on those rivet decals? I've got some and used them in the past, but had a time keeping them on the model while I was handling it, up to when I painted over them.

Bob D.

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Thanks guys, to be honest this kit has come close to having flying lessons a few times already.  :>;)

I have not used the raised decals yet so can't offer any help. No doubt in time I can tell everyone what not to do !
My intention is to install them over the etch primer and give them a light coat of the finish colour to keep them in place before continuing unless I find advice to the contrary.
I also considered putting them on with thinned PVA to keep them in place until painted. I came up with that method in the 70's for doing boiler bands out of writing paper after struggling with making them out of brass and soldering them on.

A bit of a google around should unearth some experiences e.g.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aptnvFeEqio

regards
 Bob



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Here is the tender at the level of detail supplied.
I will add more details before cleaning up ready for painting.


regards
Bob

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looks very good keep up the good work

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Thanks Charles.

Today after several days of decidedly outdoor railway unfriendly weather I gave my railmotor a spin while doing some work in the garage while the sun was out and the windchill factor was acceptable. :>;)
 I noted it would slow, stop and then restart at two locations around the layout. No worries.. an inch of graphite on the rails dabbed in front of the railmotor as it passed me would fix it.
It certainly did instantly when it got back around to one of the spots. Not so the other.
To cut a long story short the problem at the other location was me.. I had not soldered a stock rail on one point and had been unknowingly relying on the rail joiner.  After a soldering job the railmotor ran smoothly as expected for over an hour at crawl speed until I had to return inside.

Back to soldering and filing brass and aluminium.

regards
 Bob

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problem solved "happy dance"

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Here is another historic photo. It shows one of my CV 4 wheel vans under construction a couple of years back. This one is out of styrene.


The NSWGR persisted with such unsuitable British type designs long after they had started using bogie stock in the 1800's and  examples were still running in the 1970's.

regards
 Bob

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Today the weather turned nice after the last week where -8C starts and maxing out at 5C convinced me that an indoor layout would be much more sensible at this time of year.

An hour spent out of the wind watching trains was possible today as the temperature made it back into the teens.
Here we see another load of coal heading for Ten Town while the railmotor passes with passengers up on the main line soon to alight at Seven Mile Mulga.




regards
Bob

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Looks good Bob! What brand of track do you guys use down-under?

Bob D.

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Hi Bob, I would think that the vast majority use Peco code 124 and that is what I am using this time. It is a bullhead section and while incorrect for Australian railway track it has shown it can handle the UV levels and weather present here over many years on outdoor layouts. Peco also make a flat bottom code 143 that represents modern pandrol clipped rail. I have a couple of yards of that and a couple of yards of Atlas (donated to me) in one siding. Outdoors I decided I would ere on the side of known reliability rather than scale looks. I purchased mine directly from Hattons in the UK although it is regularly available over here.
Indoors I see many are now using Micro Engineering which would be very close to local construction in the era I model.

regards
Bob

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Given the road closures out of town at the moment I guess it was inevitable that rail travel on my line was also suspended.



:>;)

regards
 Bob

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Hi Bob,
I think you might need a rotary plough, a wedge plough simply isn't going to cut it.

Have you added the antifreeze to the radiators on your Tin Hare and 48 Class yet? :bg:

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Antifreeze??
Damn.... maybe that's why the CPH was having trouble!!!




I'll have to look and see if I have any left in the tin.  :>;)


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:bow::bow:
That photo is worth 5 moosies just for the attempt - so here they are :moose::moose::moose::moose::moose:

They ought to feel real at home in the snow :bg:

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I agree with oztrainz

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Dumb like I am, I keep forgetting that you folks have your seasons a half year out of sync with us.

Good to hear from you. Have you ever tried plowing the white s**t? I would suppose that would only be successful with  powdery snow, which I don't know if it gets cold enough in your area to occur. Had a friend years ago, who had an O scale outdoor trolley line, and he said that he had some success with continually backing and ramming powder but with the wetter snow the plow would just roll up a ball until the ball got too large to move. His layout was on ground level.

Herb

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I doesn't last long enough to worry about here Herb. A heavy rainfall washed it away by the next day. I could have easily cleared it away to run a train but the biggest problem would have been staying upright. The ground was still warm enough that I was walking on ice not dry snow and my football boots that had studs on the bottom were given away decades ago :>;)
The wind chill from the polar vortex made it decidedly unpleasant outdoors.

The 48 did attempt to climb the grade.




regards
 Bob

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yep great winter weather even snowing in sunny Queensland, your rail motor brings back memories of younger days

Dennis

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Hi Bob,
after today's drop of snow you'll need a bigger plough :bg:
The temperature readings for the past 72 hours on the Bureau of Meteorology website for Glenn Innes airport at http://www.bom.gov.au/products/IDN60801/IDN60801.94588.shtml make for some interesting reading. Hope you've rugged up well for tonight

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Another 3 railmotors would make a nice sight Dennis.

The good thing about all the cloud cover is it keeps the minimums warmer so my pipes don't freeze John. -8C no bathroom hot water and -10c and below no water at all :>)

Plenty of things to do indoors at the moment and have managed to get a couple of short sessions flying r/c although the new battery technology does not give me nice hand warmers after a flight like NiCads did. :>(

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Not much to report lately. Outdoor railroading doesn't seem to be popular at this time of year for some reason :>;)



After the recent heavy winds I found most of the goods shed scattered around the yard.  Repairs were done with a thinners based construction adhesive.  I'll see how successful I am next time it blows, soon be windy season here.  Got to put the roof back on yesterday, maybe I'll leave the rocks in place?

regards
 Bob

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You mean those BIG chimneys, Bob?



Herb

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There's a thought Herb, I'll search for some chimney shaped rocks. :>)

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With spring approaching I have started on the first round of low level scenic development this week. Also known as lawn mowing and edging :>)
I will have to re-attach the trees I found scattered about the yard, do some painting to preserve the wooden buildings and refresh the greenery with some spray paint just for starters. I added a small touch of graphite to a couple of inches of track when the railmotor was noticed to be a bit jerky in places as it trundled slowly around as the first train for the season. After another couple of laps it ran flawlessly.
regards
Bob

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Glad to see you coming out of "hibernation" Bob :bg:

We finally had a nice, low 70s day today with low humidity and blue skies after getting much needed rain yesterday.

Pace yourself on that "low-level scenery", save your energy for the big tasks such as running the RR :moose:

BobD.

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That sounds good Bob. It will be a week or two yet till it reaches into the 70's here but getting close. With no cool breeze today is perfect. Nearly finished repainting the wood structures. I might replace the roof on the goods shed with a plastic one, once it needs painting again.... it is down to about 2 ply now.
Time to keep an eye out for snakes again. At least we don't have bears to worry about :>)
regards
Bob

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Always one to retest theories I decided to do a complete clean of all wheel treads and the track as part of a spring revamp. This started off just with cleaning and oiling pickups and bearings on the engines as a matter of routine maintenance, however I thought it would be interesting to once again see how reliable the locos would be with surgically clean track and wheel treads.

Result, by day two the railmotor was already jerking and or running away on its own devices and the 48 class refused to start without a push at one stage. Back to powdered graphite and all is well in the world again. Sometimes the scientific process to be skeptical of all results can mean unnecessary extra work but it is good to know that the previous testing in O gauge stands up with the long history of success in smaller scales. :>)

regards

Bob

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That'll teach ya!!! ;)

I kinda did the same thing this weekend.  I replaced an 072 lefthand turnout with an 072 Wye not long ago.  All engines seemed to run fine in and out of each direction.

I placed my Williams USRA 4-6-2 on the track and let it go round, but when I brought it back into the small yard it derailed going thru the left turn portion of the Wye.  I must have tried it a dozen times, noticed the 2 front wheels of the pilot truck lifting off the rail every time (When did this start :shocked:).

I fooled around with the pilot truck, finally getting it so it derailed no matter which way the engine went :bang:

I ended up putting a piece of "spring" under the pilot truck mount and that seemed to fix most of the issue, but if I slowed down enough it would derail (going at 1/2 throttle it went right thru, go figure).

Then it hit me...check the rail dummy!  The piece of rail just beyond the frog was raised just a hair, I got it back down and glued/spiked and so far it's worked :2t:

I could probably take the "spring" out, but I'm going to wait a while and see what happens.

BobD.

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Yes, you would think I would learn by now Bob :>)

Leading and trailing trucks are often a source of some concern, good to hear you have solved this one Bob.

Sun is out, wind is low, might get some more train running today.

regards
Bob

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This photo represents a good deal of filing and drilling of the bearing block ,chassis and boiler to get the motor and gearbox to fit. Part of the penalty for using a 3-rail designed item i.e. not designed for regular motor /gearbox.



The pack of guitar ferrules are used with nails as coach roof ventilators.

regards
 Bob





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Good start Bob :thumb:  Looks to be fairly heavy already, was the chassis already machined for the axles?  Are the drivers machined/drilled for the side rods, etc?

Keep those photos coming :rah:

Bob D.

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Hi Bob, even with the boiler and chassis in aluminium it will still hurt if I drop it on my foot.

The  bearing block had the holes drilled to locate the axles. It is made of brass and can be unscrewed to drop the wheels out if needed. It is a Col Shepherd item that is often to be found under Australian 3-rail locos.
I think the rest of the loco will disintegrate before these wear out :>;)
Here is a photo from the bottom.




The wheels I used are Slaters from the UK. They are pre-drilled for attaching the side rods and come with crankpins.

regards
 Bob

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Here is a dry assembly of the major parts of the 59 class mikado 'kit'.

Lots of swear box entries to get to this point :>;)




regards
 Bob

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Lookin good, Cobber.

Keep 'em coming!


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Riveting the tender.




regards
 Bob

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A quick coat of paint and filing out the coupler pocket and screw it all together and here we are.
I think it might be time to get back to the engine.
Time to do siderods and trailing bogie methinks.


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Lookin good Bob :2t:

How did you do the rivets?

Bob D.

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Hi Bob, the rivets are the decal type that Archer, Micro Mark sell.
Mine are from Micro Mark.
My first use of them and very easy to do.

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I have some of them and used them on a SAL boxcar I made, but I had trouble getting them to stick to the plastic (unpainted) fishbelly side sills:





I think Seaboard was the only RR to ever have these 40' Double-Door, on opposite ends, boxcars.  To make it harder on the modeler, they used Dalman style trucks, try finding those in O scale (the ones I have are old Keil Line trucks with not much detail).

I have some of the staggered rivet decals and may give them a try soon.

Bob D.

Last edited on Mon Oct 26th, 2015 12:36 am by Bob D

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Hi Bob, I normally use a semi gloss clear over the decals to keep them in place before applying the finishing layers of paint but this time I used the top coat as I have done on few occasions before.
regards
Bob

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Thanks Bob, I think putting them on an unpainted surface was what I did wrong. Should have treated them just like what they are...decals :doh:

Bob

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You could give them a couple of hits with decalset or something more aggressive like solvaset to settle them down then give the model a coat of clear. I didn't have any decal solvent on hand to hide the carrier a bit better only micro sol. Plenty of weathering needed to distract the eye :>)

Bob

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Trailing truck constructed and siderods assembled. Too much rain and hail to run at the moment.




regards
 Bob Comerford

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Starting to look like a steamer now Bob :Salute:

How much soldering is involved in these kits?

Bob D.

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Hi Bob the tender is the main soldering job. The buffer beam assembly has some more and the valve gear and siderods are some more basic soldering jobs. The rest of the assembly is epoxied or drill,tap and screwed where I want it to come apart for servicing.
I would use the term 'kit' very advisedly. It is more 'assisted scratchbuilding' a la 1940's offerings in the US. This was one of a very small run of various NSWGR items offered for sale some years ago. Now off the market.

I have a modern kit for a 36 class 4-6-0 that will no doubt have plenty of soldering jobs to be done. But it will be made precisely with the fat bits cast and the thin bits etched and everything will be supplied. It is made by DJH in the UK who make first rate kits in a variety of scales for customers all around the world. I built several of their offerings in HO. Those modelling British prototype around the world in O gauge have a large range of similar kits to select from via a range of manufacturers. Given the ongoing support for British 7mm scale I have often been tempted. :>)


I guess being a smaller railroad and thus not popular with manufacturers you have to rely on conversions of models of the more popular lines when it comes to steamers for the SAL. I see they had some articulateds. That would need plenty of area such as outdoors to do them justice in O gauge.
regards
Bob

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I've used a soldering iron and a propane torch before on models, but never a resistance soldering unit. If I was really into that sort of thing I'd get one in a minute, as it is I glob too much solder onto a joint then have to file/dremel the excess off.

SAL had some 2-8-8-2 and 2-6-6-4 types. I've never seen an O-scale articulated actually running, but I can imagine they would take up quite a bit of track. The 2-8-8-2s were sold to B&O in 1920, the 2-6-6-4 was even used in heavy passenger service!

Bob

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Hi Bob, believe or not but a quick wipe with a finger tip will remove a lot of excess solder without burning you. Solder wick (obtainable from electronics shop) can also be useful in sopping up excess solder on a model, not just on electronics projects. To build the DJH type of kits I have used a temperature controlled iron for years (because I had one) but when I was away from home I just relied on a 40W iron and a small and large tip in my travel modelling box (aka fishing box). regards Bob

Last edited on Thu Oct 29th, 2015 05:43 am by Robert Comerford

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Hi Bob's and all,
Seeing O-scale articulated's have raised their head, and given Bob C's NSWGR interest, for your viewing pleasure I present the pilot model of a NSWGR 4-8-4+4-8-4 AD60 class Garratt in 7mm/' or 1/43 scale

This was on display in March 2014 at the Casula Powerhouse exhibition.

Remember this is a kit that you then have to put together..

Looks like there a might be a couple of kits still available from Model O Kits http://modelokits.com/ad-60-beyer-garratt/
From last the report I saw they were just about all sold.

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A bit out of my price John, just like the brass 38.
But I can still drool and dream. :>)
Yes, when I was talking to him a couple of weeks back there were still a few 60 class unsold.
There is an exhibition at Inverell this weekend (50 km away)but I doubt there will be much in the way of O gauge there. I do get to baby sit a 19 class while some friends are attending it though.
regards
Bob

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A strange collection of visiting stock today.
Here are some of them






regards
 Bob

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Oh my :2t:

So, how do you pick that thing up to put it on the tracks?!?!?!

Bob D.

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HI Bob D,
Your answer is "Very, very carefully" considering the price and the hours that would have been spent to get a fully finished AD60 from the kit.

The AD60 kit is not for the first-time novice locomotive kit builder,

For Bob C
Is that a Tasmanian U class Drewry locomotive leading? Whatever it is, someone has done a nice job on it.

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Definitely a two hand job Bob. Generally models of the 60 class come apart in 3 pieces. The South Africans who had an advantage of coming in late to railways compared a Garratt with a Mallet. While theoretically the US supplied Mallet was the superior engine, the Garratt outperformed it in sheer pulling power and economy under extensive comparative testing. One advantage of the Garratt is the free space to install a bigger and better firebox and that may have been the reason for the unexpected result. John, it is a Lima model based on a German narrow gauge loco (I think) but offered in a variety of schemes including British. The previous owner may well have been inspired by the Drewry shunter. It would appear to be a good basis for a 1n3-1/2 TGR model as it is about 1/32 scale. The train minus the NSWGR MRC (big white one)with a couple more 16 ton mineral wagons added after we attacked them to get their couplers to the height we use looked very neat circulating while we laid back and watched. regards Bob

Last edited on Sun Nov 1st, 2015 12:17 am by Robert Comerford

Robert Comerford
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Here is something a bit more authentic among the visiting stock.
This is a Century Models 19 class. the cutaway cab with Balwin tender version.




regards
 Bob

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Hi Bob,
Nice 19 class visitor and nice Hepburn colliery coal hopper. From what I can recall as a young kid watching these coal wagons roll past in 1959/1960, the Hepburn wagons were always marshalled as solid blocks. It was unusual to see a H mixed up with the rest of the "alphabet soup" then running on the SMR past Aberdare colliery.

I know that the Hunter region collieries got some ex-NSWGR hand-me-downs but I'm not sure if any of them were 19 class units.

Robert Comerford
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Hi John, at the end the hoppers were just used in general service and could be seen anywhere on the coal roads.
The 19 class is not such a stretch of the imagination as one was hired and used for construction and coal haulage when they were known as the A93 class.
My little train of a dozen hoppers is probably about right for such a small engine. :>)
regards
Bob

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Hi Bob,
Seeing the Garrett and talking about the 38's brings back a lot of memories for me as a kid I grew up in Lidcome in Sydney four houses from the Regents Park line to Liverpool. I remember seeing these and many others as well as having two uncles in the railway (one at Granville in the signal box on that fateful day)

DennisL:L:

Robert Comerford
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I'm sure anyone with connections to the Granville disaster will never forget it.
I had relo's scattered all around the western suburbs so I got to know those lines very well in school holidays.

Just looked up my references on the hunter coal lines. Several 19 class were hired over the years.

regards
Bob

Robert Comerford
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In the future I hope to be able to visit the Sydney AMRA club rooms once or twice a year with the use of the pensioner rail discount. They have an O gauge layout there that has been part of the inspiration for my involvement in the scale. It is however 3-rail to AMRA standards (similar to old NMRA S4 with .172 wheels). I plan to make a loco and a guards van initially to take with me to run while I am there.
Thinking laterally on how I might test it at home I have decided to once again make use of battery/ radio.

The AMRA standard wheels will run quite OK on the Peco finescale track and points I am currently using. If I want to do some testing of a 3-rail loco I will disconnect the DCC power and run battery/radio. The skate will either be made to be easily removable or be able to be locked up out of the way.
The loco will be mainly used on 3-rail so I will make a power/radio van and make the engine switchable to run off a jumper cable to the van rather than dedicate the loco to battery like BobD. In fact if someone with a collection of AMRA 3-rail and no layout moved into the area I could offer them a place to run if they did the same mods to their locos. At the very least they could see their stock operate behind my loco.

I considered making the rolling stock wheels insulated so I could run them on my DCC finescale layout with the rest of my stock. But given I only propose to have a couple of items I may not to bother.

regards
 Bob

Robert Comerford
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For those of you on the far side of the pond wondering about the AMRA NSW clubrooms I note this clip on Youtube taken at the new clubrooms. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVzCLYII9jQ The original clubrooms had a mezzanine section built for housing the O gauge. It was dimly lit giving it (to me) a magical atmosphere. Much of it was stud contact and the skate would clatter, giving the suburban electric sets almost a scale sound. I wish I had used my camera a bit more often in those days! regards Bob

Last edited on Wed Nov 4th, 2015 11:14 pm by Robert Comerford

Bob D
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Cool stuff Bob, thanks for sharing :thumb:

BobD.

Robert Comerford
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No worries Bob.
Not sure if a link to the Garratt kit that keeps getting a mention has been posted.

Here is one assembled and running on a layout.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3FQrnlp8BE

Bob

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Really nice engine and scenery, looks like it could be out in California from what I recall.

One thing I've not seen...a caboose!?!?!?!

BobD.

Robert Comerford
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Hi Bob, here they are called 'brake van' or 'guard's van'
In NSW they were originally coded with 3 letters ending in 'HG'. The first 4 wheel ones were just coded 'HG'.

The one at the rear of the train in the video is a PHG.

On a mixed train with both goods and passenger accommodation the special passenger carriage could be part guard's van and some guards vans originally had a passenger compartment.

regards
Bob

Bob D
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Sounds like the combines the US RRs used,but they were in the head end equipment category.

BobD.

Robert Comerford
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I'm sure it wasn't uncommon for railway managements to have multi-use vehicles where traffic was light.
Some of our passenger stock had first and second class sitting, sleeping and guards accommodation all in a 46'carriage.

Our CPH railmotors at one time had a mailbox attached at one end where you could post a letter. Very useful for farming communities near remote unstaffed stations.
Guards vans had areas set aside for holding small animals and coffins too.

regards
Bob

Robert Comerford
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Not all railway modelling is confined to layout building.
Shade is also important :>;)



Post hole digging and concreting was never such fun !!

regards
 Bob

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LOL! My dad had some post hole diggers that he claimed were 50+ years old...but every few years he had to replace either one of the wooden handles or one of the spades(?), I don't think any of the parts were original equipment. I know I busted my knuckles on it a few times.

Bob, do you have to level (vertically) the track every year or is it fairly stable?

BobD.

Robert Comerford
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Bob, apart from where the incorrect ballast glue disaster occurred I have not had to do any maintenance. The steel underframe and sheet panelling often used to line bathrooms is basically stable so the track remains level. The regular removal of twigs and bird poo is really all that is required and an occasional addition of some powdered graphite. Remember I am using some long rigid stock and have much smaller flanges and tyre width too. The plywood kit buildings are falling apart rapidly but my styrene structures are holding up fine. regards Bob

Last edited on Tue Nov 17th, 2015 12:39 am by Robert Comerford

Robert Comerford
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Your dad's post hole digger was probably like the woodsman's axe; still the same one..... just had several new handles and heads over its life. :>)

I did it with a shovel. I must get a pick one of these days!

regards
Bob

Robert Comerford
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Here we see a 79 class on a light transfer working passing a railmotor heading to the non-electrified extremities of the suburban network.




One might wonder what a carriage shunter is doing on such a run but it is standing in for a failed BTH 41 class.

I might get to build a 41 class class eventually and I hope it will a bit more reliable than the real ones.  :>;)

regards
 Bob

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very nice

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Robert Comerford wrote:

One might wonder what a carriage shunter is doing on such a run but it is standing in for a failed BTH 41 class.

I might get to build a 41 class class eventually and I hope it will a bit more reliable than the real ones.  :>;)

regards
 Bob


Hi Bob,
Shouldn't be too difficult to get a model that would run better than that prototype.

Probably the politest thing that could possibly said of the 41 Class is that they had the reputation of being a "dismal failure". I'm sure the crews probably had less polite descriptions when they died on the run.

For those of you who don't know/have never heard of the NSWGR 41 class.Have a look at:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_South_Wales_41_class_locomotive

Yes they were an odd beast.

Robert Comerford
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John, possibly the only good thing that could be said about the NSWGR 41 class is it saved the WAGR Crossley's from being the biggest POS imported into the country. :>)

see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WAGR_X_class

regards
Bob

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Bob, You are going to need a shade sail today if your outdoors! Forecast 41 degrees C = 105.8 degrees F

Andrew
Sandbar & Mudcrab Railway

Robert Comerford
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I think I got it installed just in the nick of time Andrew.
Sadly it won't help me when I am doing some scenic improvement (aka mowing} :>)

regards
Bob

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I started on a BTH 41 class some years ago.
This is it so far.



regards
Bob

Robert Comerford
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I decided to at least assemble the parts I have made and make a start on the engine bay roofs.
The bronze castings are 3-rail era side frames for the BTH 41 class. Nice not to have to make them myself this time :>;)



regards
 Bob

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Hi Bob,
It's now starting to look like a 41.. Well done :2t:

Robert Comerford
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Thanks John, it should be harder to loose when I put the bits away this time. I have a 59 to finish yet. :>)
regards
Bob

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Hi Bob,
Speaking of 59's - there's one on the loose around here every weekend for the next couple of weeks
http://www.lvr.com.au/sched.htm

Need any detail photos from above or beside (which side)? I should be able to snap 5917 as it heads back through Unanderra sometime in the next few weeks.

BTW Kiama and Bomaderry turntables are back in action. :glad: Hence more activity with the 59.

For those in the US, the 59 is basically a narrowed USRA light mikado as built by Baldwin Lima Hamilton post WW2 for New South Wales Government Railways with a shortened tender so that it can fit on a 60' turntable. Bob can provide more accurate details if needed.

Robert Comerford
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I'm fairly right for detail shots John, but thanks for the offer.

regards
Bob

Robert Comerford
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Since I started the 41 class I came to realise that I wanted it in red rather than the original green and thus it would have to be modified with the larger radiators and roof vents at the very least to be correct.

So some prototypical mods are under way.



Just like the full size my crews will have to hang out over the buffers if they want to cross at each end now, :>;)

regards
 Bob

Robert Comerford
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Here is the basic NSWGR 41 class body assembled. Needs some filling and filing but then details can be added over time .



These locos were an unmitigated disaster, damage done at the outset to the motors due to inadequate cooling and a host of other design failures was never successfully overcome. Our electrical engineers were able to overcome some issues but the money needed to fix them properly was never forthcoming. Ron Preston noted in his book on these engines that they did have one redeeming feature. The traction motors were rock solid. Operating without the blowers working for most of their lives and "oil cooled" :>;)  he rated them top class.

This model has the first mods done; extended radiators and air outlets moved to the roof.  Modifications only added to the already overweight design unfortunately.

Not as easy to miss in the cupboard now :>;)
Hopefully it gets finished faster than my railmotor which took more than 15 years.

regards
 Bob

Robert Comerford
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My utility poles have constantly needed repair so a more robust version made from scrap brass fret is being soldered up. Might be a lot cruder than the originals but outdoors it matters little. The poles are the only wood structure to hold up so I have re-used them.


The grade crossing timbers had to be replaced last week too. New ones are made from 60 thou styrene.

regards
 Bob

Bob D
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Thanks for all your photos Bob :moose::moose::moose:

Details like you utility poles are things I need to strat working on. I've actually been doing some scenery the past week, trying to replace areas I had to pull up due to relocating some track numerous times. Once I get the ground cover down I'm going to start concentrating on 1 area/scene/industry at a time.

BobD.

Robert Comerford
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Not a bad idea Bob, manageable chunks are often easier to attack than seeing it as one big job.... so it never gets started :>)

regards
Bob

Robert Comerford
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I thought I might make a start on the trucks for the 41 class.
I am making them in the same manner as my 48 class i.e. from 60 thou styrene.
I thought I might try without the Slaters brass bearings this time to see the amount of wear of metal in plastic.... seems to work for commercial items. :>;)
Can always retrofit.

Here is a picture of the very start. Downside is waiting for the joints to dry properly but the 48 class has done quite few miles without issue using this construction method.
One of the Slaters bearings is in the pic as is another experimental truck frame  being made from 25mm Ali tube..... downside is all the filing of metal I so love !!!:>(







The wheels should be 3'6" and I only have 40" in stock.... might cheat on this one.

regards
 Bob

Last edited on Wed Dec 16th, 2015 06:01 am by Robert Comerford

Robert Comerford
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Here is one of the bogies with decoder temporarily attached for testing.

It did a few laps and shuffled about in the dark just before posting this.



It still  needs a few more bits attached, such as the mounting block raised in height by the addition of a few more layers of 60 thou, and the rest of the side frame mounts glued on, but it is getting there.

regards
 Bob

Robert Comerford
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While making power trucks I am reminded how much better supplied I was in S gauge for diesels. The American Models locos were in my price range as donor mechs and it was easy to use HO/OO mechs with longer axles.
With our dollar expected to fall even further I might be out of the game in any scale soon. :>(

regards
Bob

Robert Comerford
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One of my 'friends' came by Christmas day. He spent some time looking at my 41 class body and at the photos on the back of a book on the class.
He then asked me why I did not have the ventilators at the bottom of the hood doors.
I replied .....  "the one I am modelling did not have that mod done to it".
Of course after he left, I spent some time perusing all the photos I had, particularly the colour ones.  I soon came to the conclusion that to have my model in the later red and chrome yellow scheme as I wanted, all the colour photo evidence pointed to having those bottom louvres.
Damn!!! :>(
I did not fancy cutting out and inserting the Evergreen 4526 siding as had been done with the top louvres now the body was assembled so I have thinned each piece of styrene strip down as thin as I can get and am hoping that paint and weathering will disguise the subterfuge.



One of my fingers is now void of finger prints :>;)

regards
 Bob

Robert Comerford
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There has been some progress on the 41 class now known as 4108 due to the selection of roof vent covers.

Still someway to go but as the drizzling rain has stopped and it has now really started pouring I might get some more done :>;)

Happy new year all!

regards
 Bob

Bob D
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Steady progress there Bob, something I need to learn to do.

I only have 1 chain drive engine (Weaver RS3), and have yet to put it on the tracks. Maybe it's time to pay Tony Walsham another visit and have my first BPRC diesel :2t:

BobD.

Robert Comerford
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Sounds like a good idea to me Bob. I'm a sucker for ALCo road switchers.
The 41 class must classify as one of the ugliest engines around but it has been an 'interesting' project.
Of course the original ideas that I could make use of an F9 Atlas mech I have and that no one in their right mind would ever offer one of these in 0 scale proved to to be wrong on both counts!!
regards
BobC

Bob D
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Bob, any more progress on the 41 class? How long before the paint shop?

BobD.

Robert Comerford
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Hi Bob, nothing that really shows much change in a photo as yet.I had to come up with a way to keep the bogie sideframes level as they were only mounted in the centre. Just finished that exercise.

Once I have made the air tanks and added the numbers and stripes I will post another picture.

I had an issue with my 48 class. Another wheel shorted out against the brass bearings so I had to pull it apart and add insulating washers between all bearings and wheels to prevent it happening again. That took some time.
I'm trying the 41 without the bearings but if I need to add them I have plenty of these slippery insulating washers from Traxxas in stock now :>)

I now have an RS3 body to make into a 40 class... I basically just use the the two hoods.
I also have an Atlas F9 that I have had since about 1996. Need to get another body someday to build into a 42 class.... I need about 2 inches of the second body to lengthen it. The 42 class was basically a stretched F7 with 3 axle bogies to run on our much lighter rail.

How's progress your way?

regards
BobC

Bob D
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Wish I could help, the only spare body I have is a MTH RailKing F3.

BobD

Robert Comerford
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Thanks for thinking of me Bob. I'll get one someday. Plenty of work to do with the projects I have already started :>)
BobC

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Are you guys getting an email every time someone posts? I am and I thought I had fixed it in my preferences but for whatever reason it's not taking hold.

BobD.

Robert Comerford
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I am on this topic. It is also in my watched topic list.
BobC

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A couple of days ago the site was down (or I just couldn't get onto it) for a couple of hours and ever since it's been sending me emails whenever someone posts to a topic I've posted to. I think the only thing I have checked is the moderators can send me emails.

BobD.

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Bob- try it now--I changed your Email addy by one letter--so messages from here should just wander off in space. Only thing is,  now it says that you are not accepting PM,s

D**n computers!

Herb

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It must be working Herb, I haven't gotten any in the last day.

Computers, gotta love em!

Bob

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Here is a 48 shell made from fibreglass. The master used was a very old brass 'kit' ,very basic in detail. They were a once off purchase some years back, no longer available.
I have one running, hopefully this one will be in the not too distant future.



regards
 BobC

Bob D
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Thanks Bob :moose:

Is there much detail cast in the shell, I do see what looks like louvers.

The steamer I'm thinking of doing has a load of rivets, I'm thinking it would be better to make a fairly plain fiberglass shell and add the rivets to it, but would consider putting the rivets on the wooden master so they would show in the mold.

BobD.

Robert Comerford
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Hi Bob, yes, there are louvres and the mesh in the top above the fan is obvious. There is close to 1/8" proud in detail thickness for the air intake boxes near the cab. I would think the process would show rivets OK.
I would not say this is the best example of a fibreglass casting, I'm sure this can be improved on. All my own castings have been in epoxy and car bog and just for small items. These two fibreglass bodies have held their shape and are quite strong.

Mind you I have seen similar 'castings' such as you are proposing done very well in paper mache, but without rivets :>)

How about making yourself a small practice casting with rivet detail etc and judging the results before committing to the big project?

I have finally found some suitable plastic tube to make the air tanks under the 41 class so it is progressing a little further. Still waiting on decals to be made at the moment.

regards
BobC

Robert Comerford
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Added the air tanks today.
Had to reattach the front cowcatcher on the railmotor after an argument with a large stick on the tracks last night :>;)



Ahhh, the joys of outdoor railways. !!
regards
 BobC

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I take it the stick won the argument? :bg:

So, are the tanks capacitors, batteries, what???

BobD.

Robert Comerford
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It did until I broke it into smaller pieces Bob :>)

The tanks are lengths of PVC electrical conduit with 60 thou styrene ends and wire recovered from a takeaway Thai noodle pack. The blue colour that makes them look like caps was impregnated in one side of the styrene (used for sign making). Sadly I have long disposed of my collection of caps that might have provided a couple of tanks :>(

regards
BobC

Robert Comerford
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4108 received its second power bogie today. 
Although it was blowing hard enough to blow a dog off a chain I had to try it under load up the grade. Fortunately this fell in front of it just as it topped the grade.


Given I was standing at a 45 degree angle to take the photo I decided that play was suspended until the winds died down. I am happy as it runs smoothly.

regards
 Bob Comerford

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Hi Bob,
well done :2t: & well dodged :glad::glad:
Never do to scratch the paintwork ;)

You now have a 41 that works better than the prototype :bow: but mind you, that wouldn't be too hard :)

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John, I think I have already exceed the reliable scale miles of the prototype. Maybe it is now time to scrap it.:>)

Bob

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LOL! Bob, after all the comments I've made on your 7mm layout it occurred to me what the 7mm actually stood for [whack].

So your RR is .276 inches to the foot vice our .250", if I calculated correctly???

I wouldn't think that is very noticeable, is the distance between the rails the same?

My dad said the company he worked for at one time (he was a carpenter) built something in the neighborhood of a 100x100 foot warehouse, they dug a trench and poured the concrete footing, then laid some cinder blocks so they could erect the walls.

When it came time to put up the siding, they found they were 3 feet too long on one side!!! He said you couldn't actually see it because it was so big, but when they counted the panels they were using is when they found the error. I guess different crews did different tasks and that's why nobody saw it until it was too late.

BobD.

Robert Comerford
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Hi Bob, it is if you try to mix the two. I have a NSWGR parcel van that was built to 1/4".
Sometimes I can use it to my advantage. Some of our first diesels were reduced in size versions of US ones.

Just like yours the gauge to scale ratio is not quite as close as it could be. So just like you have P48 (once known as 1/4AAR), the 7mm scale version is called Scaleseven and has a gauge of 33mm v the 32mm/1.25" of regular O gauge. It of course also has the skinny wheels with little flange etc.
The European toy market originally used round headed track and originally measured the gauge between the centres. Research says it was 35mm. Later changed to measuring between the rails hence the 32mm.

Most of Europe does not have this anomaly as they model it to 1:45 which is correct for 32mm/1.25". Some modellers in the USA used 17/64" instead of 1/4" to get the scale/gauge ratio the same.

I would not like to be the one to explain how I was part of a panel too many or too short. :>)

regards
Bob

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7MM cars and locos are noticeably larger if compared up close to one another, as Bob says. this is a problem that I am working on currently --not to change any standards, but trying to make a 7MM loco acceptable to run with other 1/48 cars and locos. More on this later. The discrepancy in the 1/48 being in reality 5ft gauge shows up mostly to me with small stock not having enough ''overhang''.

But after a while, my eyes have come to ignore it.

Herb

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I suppose if you compared an O5w piece to a 7mm piece of the same type you would notice the difference.

I recently bought a semi-scale Pacific. I already have a scale Pacific and the semi-scale is smaller, but RRs had smaller Pacifics anyway. This particular model (a Williams by Bachmann) almost matches the dimensions of the P-calss Pacifics Seaboard owned.

I guess if a person was lucky he could find a single piece in 7mm that would be "size-appropriate" on a O5w layout.

I've always wanted to have a train loaded with WWII German armor pieces that I've seen at the old Aberdeen Proving Grounds museum. Maybe a King Tiger wouldn't look so large if it was on a 7mm flatcar!

BobD.

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I think sometimes what is an acceptable compromise when it comes to mixing scales is in the eye of the beholder.
Because I grew up with other kid's OO British stock, the fact that is well under-gauge does not bother me even though I have spent plenty of time operating on a friend's P4 layout which has the correct scale gauge of 18.83mm rather than the incorrect 16.5mm of the OO models. However I can't come to grips with using OO for 3'6" gauge (as some do quite prolifically)even though it is almost equally incorrect in the opposite direction.

The same source as my one 1/4" parcel van supplied a 3 railed British 0-6-0 tank masquerading as a 1/4" NSWGR 18 class. I modified it for use as a much smaller NSWGR engine in 7mm scale for which it is almost spot on. It took me less than an hour to convert it back to 2-rail because the wheels were to British finescale standards already.

People are the easiest to mix in various scales Herb. :>)
If I wanted a 36" wheel in 1/4" I could use a 7mm 33" one, a 36" one becomes 40" in 1/4" scale. When I was building in S scale I used under and over sized pieces nominally from other scales.

What scale is the Tiger tank?

regards
BobC

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Hi Bob
it could be this one in 1/48
http://tamiya.com/english/products/32504tiger1/index.htm
It is still a big unit up against a 1/43 scale figure

The rest of their 1/48 military vehicle range can bee seen at http://tamiya.com/english/products/list/48mm/kit32501.htm
There are 5 pages and some useful 1/48 scale figures that could make good background figures in 1/43 scale ;)

Last edited on Wed Feb 10th, 2016 04:01 am by oztrainz

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Tiger tanks on flatcars might test the width limits of your loading gauge. :>)

regards
Bob

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While a Tiger or King Tiger might be too big, a Marder III Ausf H would be just right:





This is probably my favorite WWII "tank", to me it just looks like a sports car :Salute:

This is 1/48 too, from here:

MARDER III AUSF H

I'd love to get one, but at $50 US that may be too much.  But it WAS the only 1/48 model I could find of it.

I already have one, but it's in 1/6 scale and might be too big:



Scratchbuilt except the wheels and tracks.  The "Ghost" emblem is for the 11th Panzer Division.

I had to get out of 1/6 scale, ran out of room, had to go down to 1/48 scale to make stuff fit inside the house :Crazy:

BobD.

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hervorragenn Replik!

Herb

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Thanks Herb (had to look it up, English IS my foreign language [whack]), my take on German (or any other) comes entirely from old 50s-60s TV shows!

I actually have all the tools, spare tracks, and other accouterments on the model, but got them after that photo was taken.  Even have seats, ammo, and radio gear inside, plus 4-man crew.

BobD.

Last edited on Sat Feb 20th, 2016 05:09 am by Bob D

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Nice work on the tank Bob.

regards
Bob

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I have 6 tank carrier flat wagons just waiting for the lottery win so I can put tanks on them.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-eanwM5CJXdo/UiMlez9QKDI/AAAAAAAABpI/7aKHY9TFPyI/s1600/img946+copy.jpg

In the meantime, tractors and containers will have to suffice!
Hopefully my decals I have had made for my 41 class will turn up next week and I can move it closer to the finish line.

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Look like Centurians. I can't say which mark, but they are Centurians

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Yes, the tanks are Centurions, and a Century of bills is what each tank would cost me in 1:43.5.

Here are the TE's when under construction.



Made primarily out of cardboard and Venetian blind slats, I used some Athearn bogies to further keep the cost down as they are well hidden from view. Given there were only six of them I decided to make all of them in one go.
They did get used for transport of general heavy loads towards the end of their lives. 
regards
 BobC

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Yippee, the decals arrived so I am ready to continue with construction.
The stripes are each in two pieces, butted together.



regards
 Bob

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Hi Bob,
Nice work with the decals. I doubt the real 4108 ever looked as good, given the poor record of the class in service. :bow::bow:

Last edited on Fri Feb 26th, 2016 02:27 pm by oztrainz

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Robert Comerford wrote: Made primarily out of cardboard and Venetian blind slats, I used some Athearn bogies to further keep the cost downYa gotta love the inventiveness of model railroaders :2t: A handy block for not tipping the Microsol, too.

While we're talking tanks for a bit, though the doctrine had issues, a couple of US tank destroyers have always been favorite armor, the M10 and especially the M36. That the M18 could put the hammer down and really scoot has its appeal, too.
Another favorite armor type is the 8 wheel armored cars. Way back in the past I drew a cartoon of a preserved SdKfz pulling up in front of a 'we specialize in foreign makes' garage which had a "1/2 off brakes" sale sign in the window. That would make a fun diorama but there is only one of me - so little time, so many funky critters to bash for On30.

Just had this thought, you know what would be fun, (yeah, I know, not till I tell you) a train of tanks on flats, and have the couplers tinkered with to have extra slack. You back up to run in the slack then you could start the train one car at time as the slack runs out with a click-click-click ...

The now discontinued Kadee #4 with their metal skinny-pin draft gear boxes were great for that, just leave out the centering spring.
I wish they still made those :f:

Last edited on Fri Feb 26th, 2016 02:57 pm by Kitbash0n30

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Been years since I've seen one of those round inkwells. Been years since I've seen an inkwell of any shape!!

Herb

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The body will look correct when I get into weathering it John. No 41 would be complete without at least the leaking battery acid down the sides.
Hopefully it wont be too long before I can call it complete for the moment and just run it.

Must be getting soft John, I had to put the AC on while having tea last night, and I am probably in one of the coldest places in the country.:>)

The British would often get their long hook coupled coal trains to start by being able to take up the slack in each chain one at a time. If those trains had been auto coupled the little engines would not have been able to get them rolling. Pendon museum in the UK showed that happening in model form when I was touring Europe in the 70's. Don't know if it is still done.

Yes, it does remind me of an inkwell Herb. I think I left them behind when I entered high school. I can't remember if I made it myself or bought it.

regards
Bob

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AC?!?!?!?!  It's a bit cool here in Virginia (low 20sF).

Good work Bob, I like to see things folks have done that are not in the norm.

I forgot what you used for louvered vents, but here's a place in the US that sells resin louvered decals (and rivets) in O scale:

ARCHER FINE TRANSFERS

I've used their rivets and they look good on a model, putting them on can be a chore however.

BobD.

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Hi Bob it was reading 32C in the lounge room when I went in for tea. The reverse cycle rarely gets turned onto cool up here. Getting soft being back home, I wouldn't have thought about it until it got up around 38 when I lived down on the plains. :>)

It will soon enough be in the low 20s in old money when I get up of a morning. The summer has taken long enough to come, I'll enjoy it while it lasts.



The louvres are Evergreen 40 thou clapboard if memory serves me right.

regards
BobC

Robert Comerford
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p.s. I used their rivets but wasn't overly impressed with the louvres I tried.

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Bob-

Where ever the louvers and rivets came from, and no matter the prototype's poor performance, I think that you have a d**n fine model. Never mind the real ones faults--we live in a fantasy world--not being able to model with 100% accurac in any event. We all have a loco that out performs the others, and one that we wish would act better--prototype not withstanding.

Herb

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Today 4108 entered service.
I obviously didn't take long for the batteries to boil over and have a fire in one of the hoods  (grin) !



Perhaps after this 'short' diversion I will get back to the 59 class soon!
It had been several years since I first started the 41 so it is about time it was done.

regards
Bob

oztrainz
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Hi Bob,
Nice job - I think it is fully worthy of moose::moose::moose::moose::moose::moose:
You'd better keep a "rescue loco" handy. It looks like the 41 might need it soon :bg::

Last edited on Thu Mar 3rd, 2016 05:20 am by oztrainz

Robert Comerford
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I'll try to do a little better than the real thing.

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Hi Bob,

That is great loco. Very well done.

Alwin

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Thank you for your kind comments
Bob

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Looks like it's been running for years

Great stuff Bob :Salute:

BobD.

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Thanks BobD.
Had to do some repairs to a section of the layout yesterday. The ghosts of using the wrong glue to ballast in some places keeps coming back to haunt me.
I am also spending as much of the remains of summer just watching the trains run in the early evening.
regards
BobC

Robert Comerford
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Lucky I was on hand to photograph ancient ex-NSWGR N67 class no. 72 being taken from its shunting duties at the shed to assist the old Fowler push the morning 'coalie' up the grade to the mainline. ;>;)




regards
 Bob ... in the Northern New England tablelands where summer is still present.

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Good stuff Bob [toast]

So I take it a leaf blower is part of your maintenance routine? How about varmints? We have squirrels all over the neighborhood, plus possum, racoon, rabbits, and the occasional large flying creature that could make a wreck out of a backyard layout.

Is Australia prone to earthquakes, never heard of you guys having one down there?

BobD

Robert Comerford
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Hi Bob, we are out of the fault line. The Kiwi's have that pleasure. We do have the occasional earthquake though. Some years ago Newcastle had a serious one.
See here .. http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/blogs/on-this-day/2011/12/on-this-day-newcastle-earthquake-

I don't own a leaf blower (probably should) but there are plenty to be found in garden sheds. I just use a rake and broom. I trimmed some of the neighbours trees that have been dropping things on the line today.
I get visits mainly from birds and possums and cats. Of course we also have our friendly spiders and snakes but so far they haven't caused any derailments!

regards
BobC

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I once had a squirrel decide that the loft of the shop building--where the layout then was-- was a great place to live. A whole story in it's self.

Good looking locos Bob! I know that the 41 will have a better service record than what the real one seemed to have.

Herb

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Fortunately for us Koala's prefer to stay in trees.
I think the 41 says that ugly is the new beautiful Herb :>)

Lots of pork barrelling by politicians saw us with a host of differing small runs of locos. Good for us modellers, but a disaster when it comes to running a railway. They would send out one of our engineers on a fact finding mission around the world to report back on best practice for our use. Having been correctly advised they would promptly ignore it every time.

regards
Bob

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Old no 72 must have objected to having its photo taken the other day. I don't know how much running it had prior to my purchase a few years ago but yesterday the smoke started rising from the motor as the ammeter reading headed top side of an amp. New motor on order!
The loco came from a stud contact outdoor railway where it was masquerading as a 1/4" scale 18 class. The fact that it was to 1/4" scale suggests the former owner was in his senior years as use of that scale for NSW modelling was only practised by the NSWGR themselves for their promotional model railway layouts and a few individuals up until the 1950's.

Cramming in as much running as I can before my thoughts turn once again to the comforts of an indoor layout have seen some derailments at the join between the access ramp and the main layout baseboards. The access ramp support had lifted enough to create a hump at the join that now was an issue that could not be ignored. Armed with hammer, saw, battery drill and suitable screws it was attacked and hopefully no derailments will happen again for some time. The access ramp was only intended to be short lived as I wanted the indoor storage to be at main baseboard level. This still can't happen until more junk is shifted. The supports are only some pine L girders shoved in the ground so it came as no surprise. Maybe next summer :>)

regards
Bob

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I finally remembered I had a 59 class waiting my attention!
The last couple of days have been spent assembling the gearbox then getting the gearbox and motor to fit. That was after carefully reaming the siderod holes to get the wheels to turn smoothly.
 I like to get the mech running nicely before attaching the valve gear.
 Here we see the mech running in.



regards
 Bob

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Bob-

I have run in mechs. for years by using a piece of acrylic (Perspec, Plexiglass etc) with grooves cut in it for the flanges. This puts a slight load on things, but doesn't wear the treads---bumpers at each end. Costs one heck of a site less than those multi roller things, and I think does a better job in less time than having the mech run free.

Herb

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Herb, the mech is actually being run in with the wheels suspended in the air.
The fancy roller thing was a present for looking after a friend's dogs while they were in Europe over xmas/new year. I normally just oil up a length of track and place a stop in front of the loco.
regards
Bob

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Putting old number 72 back together wasn't as easy as I thought. For a start it took me some time to realise what I thought were pickup issues and misaligned worm were due to the ESC having been damaged by the previous motor. It ran but with different issues in each direction.

I also put a 2 start worm on to increase the speed and now find I have issues climbing the access ramp.
Decision,decisions? ! (grin)

I did have a bit of luck however. Examining the previous motor revealed a brush so worn as to short out the commutator and so a clean up and fitting of another end bell from a motor that had its windings cut by the mounting screw sees me with another usable motor.

regards
Bob

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Fine bit of "Sherlocking" there Bob, what clued you in on the problem?

I haven't had any issues with my BPRC electronics yet, been almost a year now since I started converting. I did have a motor with a bent shaft but that's all.

BobD.

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Hi Bob, after checking all the mechanical and electrical contact areas and realising they were OK, it is just a case of looking at what is left. All that was left was the decoder. It was also obvious the smoke I saw coming out of the loco was from the decoder not the motor as I first thought when I examined the insides of the old motor and didn't find any burnt windings.
The fried decoder was a sound one but I replaced it with a non-sound one. The old decoder is not a total write-off however as the sound part still works OK, so it can be paired with a non-sound one. I'll use it in a loco with more room.

I have decided to go with the speed rather than the torque so will leave the double start worm in place. Only after all this did I realise I could have fitted the bigger motor I use in all other locos (Mashima 1833) with some minor mods rather than replace with the small one and had both the speed and torque required.... Oh well :>)

That's good to hear. Most electronics is reliable these days Bob.

regards
BobC

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Nice weather has come back again, so I am doing some more work on the layout.

Some more HV power poles and telephone poles under way.



regards
 Bob

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Hi Bob and all,
I made it to the Aus7mm Modeller's Forum at North Sydney last Saturday and found two 41 class locomotives -
One still in its box


and one on its wheels in original? NSWGR green


Also of display was the G2 good shed from Model O Kits


and an A3 station building from Bergs Hobbies


and Ray Pilgrim is doing NSWGR lower quadrant signals in 7mm scale as well as HO.

and


May be of interest to you?

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Many years since I have been to the forum, maybe again in the future.

I'm guessing the signal post and platforms are rapid prototyped that is why they have been offered in 7mm. They look nice. Outdoors is a very tough environment, might contact Ray if I have O scale indoors.
Ray and I were members of the Protype model railway club in North Sydney many moons ago.
I did think the Bergs 41 kit was well made, it was just I had already started my own when they announced it.
regards
Bob

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Hi Bob,
as I understand it, Ray's signals have 3D-printed masts and a servo mounted below the base-plate to operate the semaphore arm.

I missed getting a photo of the new HG brake-vans from Model O Kits but got photos of most of the "stuff" in the trader's room. They still have a few Belpaire 36 Class kits done in conjumction with DJH (UK) available and one on display that I didn't get a photo of.

Anything in particular (locos/wagons/structurea) that you might need? I can have a close look at the photos and give you a read on who had what (and a price if you are lucky and I can read the sticker on the box in the photo)

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Thanks for the offer John, no, nothing I need.
I have a 36 class kit; my big spend for the decade !!

At least I am in front of them when it comes to having HG guards vans.:>)

regards
Bob

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Today, while looking for an electrical fault that didn't exist....(don't ask :>;)  ), I decided to give the little rail tractor a spin.
It had just stopped raining and as we all know 2-rail outdoors on wet track doesn't work. Particularly when the motive power is a dinky toy sized 2 axle model that has little weight. That situation has been acknowledged as the province of stud contact operation for many years.
Well the first lap proved it needed a couple of prods but a quick application of the magic powdered graphite soup over a few inches of rail saw the little critter
 happily rolling around at very slow speed.



regards
 Bob

Last edited on Sat Apr 9th, 2016 09:44 am by Robert Comerford

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I have been busy populating the layout with scratchbuilt utility poles of various types to give some vertical reference to the trains now the overhead has gone.

Here is part of the layout. the poles go all the way around.



regards
 Bob

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I have a need for a locomotive to take to operate occasionally on a club 3-rail layout.
Ideally I would also like it to be useful on my DCC layout.
I am confident I can get a set of wheels that can be adjusted to get by on both sets of standards but I had to consider the options for switching between the two pickup systems and protocols.
In the end I decided to go with neither and rather than have a removable skate and switching the decoder in/out, etc  I would go with a battery/radio model.

I have some LiFePO4 cells in stock, some were imported and found to be unsuitable for use in model aircraft. Rather than just dispose of them I am finding low current demand uses for them such as powering my door bells. I also have some perfectly good 2 cell battery packs that are not doing much since I no longer fly the tiny planes they were purchased for.  To get the power up to 12V I have imported some Pololu converters that happily supply current down to an input of 2.5V.
Here is a photo of the test vehicle, a modified Lima 4F. I have as yet to build the loco for the intended use on the 3-rail layout.


The fake A123 cell is the green one sitting out front. By the time I build the loco for travelling between layouts I will know if these cells are suitable for the intended task.
The rx is an orange 6 channel (never be placed in a flying model again) and the ESC is an 10A model with centre off control (overkill for this use). Both to be replaced by a Deltang combined rx/ESC with low off.
The tx (not shown) is a Deltang.

regards
 Bob

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Today I finally got around to installing all the ventilators on my steel carriages.
They are made from ferrules from guitar strings and Peco track nails.



Not strictly correct for those carriages but more than sufficient when watching them circulate.
Another roundtuit gets ticked off!

regards
 Bob

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I love it! Guitar parts and track nails to make scale ventilators...a brilliant idea! You can never tell what might work, that's why you should never throw anything away and be on the lookout for bits & pieces wherever you may roam.

Woodie

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Trouble is I keep throwing things away and the pile still keeps growing Woodie! :>0
regards
Bob

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Here is a shot of my token British train. The pity is I can't convert these cheap loco's to anything NSWGR.
Battery radio control.



When I come across some more cheap wagons I will add to it.

regards
 Bob

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The British train was feeling right at home this morning.




cheers
 Bob

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I now have a spare room to have some trains inside once more. It did start out as HO but it just looks too small these days. S gauge would be a perfect fit but I got rid of most of it and I don't really want to have two scales I have to scratchbuild almost everything for.
So, short w/b 2axle stock it will have to be. Not many options for locos in the era I model but I at least already have two suitable locos and a railmotor and some 4 wheel rolling stock.
Thought about handlaying track again.... for about 20 seconds!!  :>;) More Peco on the way!
Very tight curves but I will make it work.




cheers
 Bob

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Good on you for gaining the interior space.
Enjoying this thread.

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Bob

I run 40 foot 4 axle cars around curves half that radius--without having large spacing between cars. This is in 1/48, but that's not that much different than 1/45. Would look very silly from outside the curve--but from the inside--not bad at all.
Model railroading is full of compromises anyway, and to me, this is better (for the space that I want to devote) than no layout at all. Now, if you want to run 4-8-4's and 80' Pullmans, it's a different story.

Always interested in what you do.

Herb

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Reminds me of Greg Hunters line, have had some good times there when I was into garden railways.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sN4RlHmNiC0

Regards from Andrew
Sandbar & Mudcrab Railway

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Thanks chaps.

One of the problems with items such as these coal hoppers are the side buffers. I am going to have to extend the couplers to allow them to go around these tight curves without touching and forcing themselves off the track. Removing the buffers is not an option because they are part of the character of these vehicles. My usual solution in HO for close coupled long carriages was to shorten the buffers. These are whitemetal and would take some time to do so one coupler lengthened by 6mm seems to do the trick for now. Much of the govt. stock had their buffers removed towards the end as they were finally given auto couplers and I often model them that way. Saves the cost of buffers :>)

Greg's is a magnificent line. I corresponded with Greg for many years when he first started. He generously entertained me one Saturday when I got to Sydney some years ago, inviting many of his regular crew along to show me their creations too. I was very impressed with someone who even made his own rail at the outset, let alone hand laid track.
His choice of scale/gauge is probably more suited to the outdoors than mine.

NSWGR ran 3 axle locos. Even up here, what was the former main line to Qld, was dieselised with low weight branch line locos in the early 1960's and not until some wooden bridges were strengthened did we see main line units in operation. VR modellers are better off in that respect as the bo-bo Y and T classes were seen everywhere. The NSWGR perway engineer was having none of the GM salesmen's pitch that the increased axle loading was OK with diesels.

The largest possible loco for use around the loops will probably be a 73 class shunter. If I was keen on Sydney trams then these curves would be just right, given the prototype was designed to go around square corners.

cheers
Bob

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Good stuff as always Bob :moose:

Indoors here in Virginia is the way to go right now, it's been in the mid-90s (96 today) and getting hotter tomorrow :cool:

I haven't been doing much with trains the past few weeks but the heat may make me stay inside to finish a project or two.

BobD.

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I could do with a 96 degree day right now Bob :>)
Trains are a hobby so we do it when we feel like it.

It is good to be able to run in airconditioned comfort sometimes.

I found one of my small 0-6-0 steamers will go around the inside curves so it will look nice hauling some of the coal hoppers around. I will see at a later date if my other small 0-6-0 steamer can be modified with enough play to also be used inside.
cheers
BobC

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Looks like your having fun Bob.
Like the brass tender.
Another week and I'll be in Pommyland.
Still trying to finish off six coil cars before I go.
Nev.

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Robert Comerford wrote: Thanks chaps.

One of the problems with items such as these coal hoppers are the side buffers. I am going to have to extend the couplers to allow them to go around these tight curves without touching and forcing themselves off the track


Hello Bob. I had the same problem with my 'O' Gauge 10-12  ton coal wagons so here is what I did:

1) slightly increase the prototype buffer diameter by + 1" - 2" but do not alter the buffer spacing.
2) make the concave dishing of the bufferheads slightly more than the prototype.
3) use soft pencil graphite to simulate the polished wear area of the buffer centres.
4) polish the bufferheads absolutely smooth before painting or staining them.
5) very slightly shorten the buffer shanks.
6)slightly lengthen each link of the 3 link couplings.

My stock has been examined by all sorts of "experts" at Exhibitions, Club meetings etc. but no-one has ever noticed my slight 'modifications'. None of these alterations are sufficiently obvious to be visible by themselves (except to MY eyes !) but they give a cumulative effect to easier wagon shunting.

These wagons will now go round some ridiculous colliery yard curves (16" - 18" rad) and through switch divergence angles of less than 1:3.

I have also tried using very soft springing on both buffers & drawbar hooks but that doesn't work so well & does not stop 'buffer-locking'; most of my stock has rigid buffer shanks & drawbars.

Unfortunately I cannot show any photos as the FR Gallery refuses to talk to my computer any more.

Regards,     Michael

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Robert,

I have borrowed Madame's iPad thingy to load photos onto the FR Gallery.
I have no idea why they are upside down.

No jokes please about Aussies falling off at the South Pole.








With the modifications I described above, these wagons will go round any curve you want !.

Regards,     Michael

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Michael

I tried to correct your photo problem with no luck.
I couldn't download the photo's from your email, so that I could post them.
Fixable? I'm sure--but certainly not by me.

Herb


Robert Comerford
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My temporary fix is to extend one coupler on each wagon. Very crude but not noticeable when running around. The couplers are a small HO European style locally available and work fine on the outdoor layout where curves are the more usual circa 6' radii. While intended for permanent coupling I find I can uncouple with my stick I use for the Kadees without giving the wagons unintended gliding lessons, something I find I do with 3 links.



Later, when many other jobs are finished I might cut back the buffer such that it looks like it is compressed and remove the extension..... my usual method in other scales. Fortunately the long shank Kadees at the end of the rake don't need any adjustment.
However, thanks for offering advice. Always appreciated.
Hmmmm... magnadhesion still exists?? :>;)

Hope to get started on the backscene today. Much easier to do it before the front bit gets filled up.

Better get those coil cars finished Nev as no doubt you will return with a few extra projects.

cheers
 Bob

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Some of the basic backscenes are in mass production.
Will do some fine detailing later.


cheers
 Bob
p.s. how can I change the thread title to include indoors?

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I like the back scenes, nice work. I couldn't take the magnetic wheel picture so I rotated one of them.

:bg:

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Good Ken, that saves me having to invert the laptop :>)

cheers
Bob

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Thanks Ken. Now you can properly see what I suggested to Robert. The buffer heads don't look obviously oversize, nor do the 3 link couplers look overlong, but taken together they greatly reduce the minimum useable track radius.

Regards,    Michael

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Ken--
Thanks for fixing one of the shots--here is the other--car is hand lettered, no less! 

Give us a side view of one of your lettering jobs, Michael--(with Madam's help) please?



Herb

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OK Herb, if you insist. I'll post a few photos but elsewhere rather than hijack Robert's column any more.

Right now I'm ripping out old fitted carpets & underlay and fixing about 5,000 squeaking floorboards. Patience please.

Regards,   Michael

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Been busy with amendments to the baseboards. The raised mainlines (designed originally for HO or Sn42) worried me when it came to making full use of the area in O gauge. Some measuring of the leftover ply sheet told me I would have to buy another sheet if I discarded the curved sections. I decided to get out the jigsaw and make a patchwork fill of the missing bits after taking out the spacer blocks from under the mainline straights and curves. I came very close to waiting for some leftovers in a local hardware shop scrap bin... I had less than half a square foot of ply left over when I finished. :>)

Also been practising my painting skills for backdrops, been a long time.
When the weather was OK I had the railmotor circulating outside while I splattered paint over various items in the garage.... including me!
Finally the intermittent issues plaguing this loco came to a head. One of the Lima motor bogies shorted out fulltime. In the interim I removed the brushes and part of the gear train and it now runs smoothly with no (what I thought was) pickup issues.

Cheers
Bob

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This corner most likely to be a mining company servicing area.



cheers
Bob

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While waiting for track to finish loops I am doing some structures.
First off the blocks are some paling fences.
Good wood for posts and rails and cheap for palings.


Must keep this all under budget!
cheers
 Bob

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Good looking fence! The ''Paddle Pop'' sticks look to be mahogany from their color--??

Also what glue do you use for outdoor woodwork?

Herb

I think that I just learned a new (to me) Oz word! Sounds like an Aussie popsickle--and no, I'll not make any jokes about holding on to the cold end down under!!

Herb

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Excellent range of fence shades Robert. Very life like.

Regards,            Michael

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Thanks fellas.
Yes, the same as popsickles over your way.
What?? you are not meant to lick the wood?? Now you tell me Herb!!

These are for the indoor layout, if I was making them for outdoors I would most likely use epoxy. However I have found wood is not the best material for outdoor structures , plastic is much longer lasting.

I also made one using cardboard first painted in shellac for the palings.
cheers
Bob

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Wow like that fence. I have been "working" on a tarpaper shack in 1/2" scale because the coffee sturrers come out to 6" having trouble posting pictures

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That's the problem in O scale Charles, the pop sticks need cutting in half for palings, being cheap wood, apt to splinter, they often need careful work with a saw, rather than a quick swipe with the knife.
I visited a layout in Qld some years ago. Outdoors in 1/2" scale using gauge one track to represent the 3'6" gauge of the prototype. He used the regular thick pop sticks for much of his work, including the wood panelling for the carriage sides.
cheers
Bob

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Cardboard palings for comparison.

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Good stuff as always Bob.

I need to start scenicking my layout, as soon as I finish the 5 old wooden and metal kits I bough a few weeks ago.

BobD

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I've still got my 59 class build untouched for some time looking at me from the shelf Bob :>)

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Today, I finished the two loops. The points are wired and enough droppers done to allow trains to run.
I am still amazed the 49 class goes around 36" radius curves without protest!
I have just spent some time on the lounge watching them go while taking in some much needed caffeine :>0

Here is a shot or two.




Now it is time for the handlaid track to be resurrected in the coal mine sidings. Hmmmm!

cheers
 Bob

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O Gauge in the Australian Indoors!

Same thing, 'cept not as wet, Mate!
And sustaining liquids are likely to be closer......

Herb

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Yep, I miss having my layout in the back yard but then I need to remember how much fun it was to clean bird & squirrel poop off the track and buildings, pick up twigs and leaves before trains could run, cover and uncover the layout as regards to the weather, and mow the yard around the line.
Indoors...I guess I'll have to get used to it!

Woodie

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If I could find a way to alter the name of this thread to 'indoors and outdoors' I would Herb :>) The kettle and the fridge is but a few steps away!

Fortunately my outdoor layout works without attention most times I want to run trains Woodie. If I had the issues you did mine would not have lasted very long.
The indoor layout is a compromise, as much of the stock I hope to build will not run around such tight curves or would look rather silly if it did. The very small locos and short stock such as the 4 wheelers and 40' or under bogie wagons will suffice indoors.
Being able to run trains when the weather is inclement or at night will be welcome. I admit to having doubts about having an 0 gauge continuous run layout in a small room but the more I do the more confident I will be happy with the result. It will complement the outdoor layout.

The theme will probably be a double track section of a private mining line with running rights for the NSWGR. Such a situation existed on the South Maitland Railway. They ran passenger trains from Cessnock to Sydney at one time and government locos and stock mixed it with the SMR coal trains.
cheers
Bob

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Hi Bob,
As a 5 year-old kid it was a treat to be allowed to stay up late to watch the Cessnock Flyer come through with the S class and 2 passenger cars. My family was in one of the company houses at Aberdare colliery opposite Caledonia station platform from about 1959 through 1960. Sunday was a special treat because the Cessnock Flyer was hauled by a 48 class diesel, arriving at Cessnock mid morning.

My mother was less than impressed on her laundry days with the SMR tank locos on full coal trains that topped up their tanks and worked over their fires at Caledonia station before flogging uphill some more along Caledonia Bank on their way to Maitland.

By early 1961 we'd moved to the Illawarra and Dad had a new job with Australian Iron & Steel Collieries.

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I don't think any housewives were impressed living next to a railway line John.
Steamers and Alco's would not be high on their list of good things; particularly on laundry day!
A train on one of the Sydney branch lines was known as the 'flying sootman'
cheers
Bob

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Having several handmade points and some sections of plain track recovered from the last layout in the shed I am trying to make use of it. Being made from code 100 I first had to make a transition section. This I did last night.
The original sections were made in a jig. The straight sections were glued and soldered in the jig. Every 6th sleeper was pc board and the rest were glued with either an 'acrylic kwick grip' or pliobond. I don't have either or the jig these days. The curved sections were soldered and glued on one side, then laid as required on the layout and the other rail attached using a couple of home made track gauges ( also gone).

Seeing I don't have any heat setting glue in stock I am making the curves insitu with the wood sleepers merely cosmetic with one or two small ME spikes to keep them in place until ballasted; relying on the pc board sleepers for gauge.

I'm not that fussed with handlaying plain track these days but it was this or build some points in code 124 Peco rail section stripped from some of the flex track. :>;)





Ever onward
Cheers
 Bob



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Plenty of work with files,cutters, hammer and soldering iron the last couple of days.
Finished doing enough wiring last night to test run engines around all the sidings.

Wired the points up. The control is via switches recovered from a previous layout ( actually several ,these switches have been used on at least two HO,two S and one O layout previously). The switches are mounted in a piece of thin ply as they were glued to a 3" thick Styrofoam baseboard previously.
The control rod is made from paper clips.




Here is a switch from underneath, already wired for a HO size point.



cheers
 Bob

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Insert dummy post to observe effect.
ignore
Bob


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