Freerails Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > HO & OO Scale > Lets talk about building my first layout

Freerails IS ACCEPTING new Members ... To join Freerails ... See how to Register as a Member in the 'Joining Freerails' Forum

Lets talk about building my first layout
 Moderated by: . Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Wed Jan 13th, 2016 11:46 pm
  PMQuoteReply
1st Post
Sean W
Registered
 

Joined: Wed Apr 15th, 2015
Location:  
Posts: 91
Status: 
Offline
Hey guys!

I have been chewing on the idea of building an HO scale 4x8 logging/coal mining layout for a good 6 months. I don't do anything without doing countless hours of research. That research has lead me to the Iain Rice's " Lilliput Logger Layout ". It has everything I was wanting in a layout, a logging area, a coal mine, steep grades, a small town, big bridges, saw mill, a continuous loop, lots of switching and it even has a port/dock! I was thinking the era would be post WWII 40's in the Pacific North West.

Here are my thoughts, open to any input!

Benchwork:
Id like for this to be portable and maybe even take it to shows one day. So I was thinking four 2x4 legs with a 1x2 frame.

Roadbed:
I was going to build up layers of Polystyrene Foam Board Insulation to make the entire layout about 8" thick, maybe 10" to get the height I want out of the trestle on the top right corner.

Track bed:
Cork on top of sound absorbing material, unless I get lazy and ill just use cork.

Track:
Id like to use Code 55 track, but it seems like the selection of pre-fab code 55 HO track is very limited... and expensive. I don't want to hand lay. To keep costs down and have access to a variety of track, ill use code 83 with peco #4 turnouts with live frogs. All the turnouts will be manual throws. To get the 4% grade I want, I'd use Woodland sceneics pre fabbed foam grades.

Backdrop:
Joey Ricards beautiful backdrops

Power:
DCC with power leads here and there. Going to keep this relatively simple.

Locos:
Largest would be a 3 truck shay/climax. Also some critters/railtrucks ( the reason for the live frogs) 2 truck shays... etc. This is important because the ends of the passing sidings would need to fit a 3 truck shay, I'm a little worried about this.

rolling stock:
Skeleton log cars, 30'(?) flats/box/gondola, bobber caboose etc

Please leave any feedback and thoughts!

Here is the track plan:



Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Jan 14th, 2016 09:23 am
  PMQuoteReply
2nd Post
Kitbash0n30
Registered


Joined: Mon Dec 10th, 2012
Location: Boonville, Missouri USA
Posts: 878
Status: 
Offline
Sean W wrote: Benchwork:
Id like for this to be portable and maybe even take it to shows one day. So I was thinking four 2x4 legs with a 1x2 frame.
Portability goal makes that section joint shown in Ian's drawings pretty much a necessity.
Long side of layout is going to want more than a 1x2 in order to give enough to get your fingers around for moving the thing.
Might want to hard surface the section interface edge up to ground level.

Those are the thoughts I've got during a 03:22 in the morning insomnia attack.



____________________
See y'all later, Forrest.
Screw the rivets, I'm building for atmosphere
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Jan 14th, 2016 09:31 am
  PMQuoteReply
3rd Post
Kitbash0n30
Registered


Joined: Mon Dec 10th, 2012
Location: Boonville, Missouri USA
Posts: 878
Status: 
Offline
Sean W wrote: Locos:
Largest would be a 3 truck shay/climax. Also some critters/railtrucks ( the reason for the live frogs) 2 truck shays... etc. This is important because the ends of the passing sidings would need to fit a 3 truck shay, I'm a little worried about this.
If someone could figure out how to do this critter ...
http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images/brook2.jpg
Or maybe this one
http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images/ls115.jpg
Or, especially, this fully accessorized critter.
http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images/hetc1171.jpg
This beastie would have folks wondering
http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images/sslvD500.jpg
Well, hey, if it was good enough for Aberdeen Proving Grounds it is good enough for a logger
http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images/apgE1.jpg
An actual lumber logger
http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images/cclx0.jpg

Last edited on Thu Jan 14th, 2016 09:48 am by Kitbash0n30



____________________
See y'all later, Forrest.
Screw the rivets, I'm building for atmosphere
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Jan 14th, 2016 08:59 pm
  PMQuoteReply
4th Post
W C Greene
Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Royse City, Texas USA
Posts: 8055
Status: 
Offline
Howdy Sean, That's a nice...and ambitious layout plan. If this is your first layout, just to get your "feet wet", I might suggest possibly using the "less is more" philosophy. It is great to want everything you can get on that 4 by 8 but you might find that it can become more involved than you at first realized. Just to see how things go, how about starting with a diorama or two which could be incorporated into a larger layout. This way, you could have the fun of building something without the commitment (chained?) of having too much to do on a first time layout.
Have you considered a sectional, or modular layout? Each section could have tracks to operate upon and scenery to build...and before you know it, you have a layout. Also, sectional layouts are easy to transport to shows and there might be a modular club in your area that would show operating layouts which you could be a part of. I have some friends here who don't have layouts as such but get together to "hook up" (lame term..) and operate at the shows. They build modules that interface and get the joy of running trains and building modules but don't have room for a home layout.
Just some ideas from an old goat who has built many, many layouts and knows how things go.
Don't let me sound discouraging, your idea is fine. Just take it easy and that way you can avoid "burn out" or getting stuck in a corner while the painted floor dries.

Woodie



____________________
It doesn't matter if you win or lose, its' how you rig the game.
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Jan 14th, 2016 10:05 pm
  PMQuoteReply
5th Post
Sean W
Registered
 

Joined: Wed Apr 15th, 2015
Location:  
Posts: 91
Status: 
Offline
Hey Woodie,

Thanks for the input.

I am afraid that I will loose interested/ get burnt out/ run out of money/ get in over my head... But at the same time, currently (with out having started anything) I think to myself, how hard could it be. haha

People like you, and the deceased Paul ( Shamus ), Joey, Milocomarty, Dave from thunder mesa and Duane make it look so easy... haha

A little plaster some wires, ground cover and some paint and bam, beautiful layout! easy peasy!... right?

Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Jan 14th, 2016 11:26 pm
  PMQuoteReply
6th Post
oztrainz
Super Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 10th, 2013
Location: Unanderra, Australia
Posts: 1098
Status: 
Offline
Hi Sean,
Some questions that might trigger some answers that might save you some money on fabrication.

What tools do you have available in your toolkit now?
Do you have the ability to cut square from longer stock lengths or will stuff have to be pre-cut for you? If you can't transport and store the longer lengths then pre-cut is a more expensive option that will get you moving quicker.

Are you more comfortable working with timber than metal? If you are prepared to look at metal, then aluminium framing for your modules may be an option. Like this


If you are planning this layout for possible future exhibition use then weight becomes a significant design issue. Aluminium framing has a significant edge over timber construction for the frame and legs. Have you given any thought to using free-standing tables as a foundation? Like this?

Three 4'x 2' tables with fold-up legs and blow-moulded tops would:
- adequately support your planned layout
- are quick to set up and tear-down at exhibitions
- can be raised to a higher height cheaply if necessary
- give you the ability to move the layout out from the wall easily during the construction phase (Think slide the modules on a smooth surface on the tables rather than lift and drag.) :bg:

For ease of handling, look at building this as Four 4' by 2' modules rather than two 4' by 4' modules as drawn. The 4' by 2' modules will fit through a standard doorway without the module having to be tipped onto its side to go through a door. You stand far less chance of wiping out something (scenery/track/structures) in transit if your module stays horizontal during transit.

That ought to do for Round 1,



____________________
Regards,
John Garaty
Unanderra in oz
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Jan 15th, 2016 12:32 am
  PMQuoteReply
7th Post
Sean W
Registered
 

Joined: Wed Apr 15th, 2015
Location:  
Posts: 91
Status: 
Offline
John,

I hadn't considered aluminum... Ive worked with and am comfortable working with both, wood or aluminum... thank you for the suggestion!

Last edited on Fri Jan 15th, 2016 12:52 am by Sean W

Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Jan 15th, 2016 05:42 am
  PMQuoteReply
8th Post
ddonley
Registered


Joined: Tue Aug 30th, 2011
Location: New Jersey USA
Posts: 167
Status: 
Offline
Sean, really consider Woody's advice. I know it sounds like everyone is undermining your plans but they are suggesting things so that you don't get frustrated with the hobby. I jumped into layout building in a similar way that you are and had the very problems that Woody mentions. Ultimately though I can't tell you to go or not to go for this plan. You will make that decision.

Just some food for thought. Ian was good at making plans look full and larger than reality. In a 4 by 8 this plan almost seems too good. I suggest you look up the Lilliput logger and find photos of others who have tried to build this layout. What I have seen is that everything doesn't quite work out. It gets too compressed or skewed. Ian's perspective drawings work for conveying the idea of the layout but when put to practice the layout looses that full and larger than reality look. Also this plan does not account for store bought turnouts or structures. You will have to make them to make the plan work. If you stick with this plan I suggest keeping your track unattached to the layout so that you can move it around to find what works and what will possibly need to be eliminated.

Again though, don't take this as a discouragement away from the hobby as a whole. Just information to help you tackle the hobby better so that you can get enjoyment out of it more.



____________________
David
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Jan 15th, 2016 03:37 pm
  PMQuoteReply
9th Post
W C Greene
Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Royse City, Texas USA
Posts: 8055
Status: 
Offline
Yep...it's really easy. Just some plaster, wires, and a little work. You might add years of experience building these things. As David mentioned, many fine track plans are thought up by fellows who have never built any layouts and sometimes don't have a clue of what will really work.
You might check out some of the great logging layouts on the net and in magazines like Timber Times. And if you really love trees and locomotives, there are some great books available either in paper or online. A little research is a great thing. I love logging but build mining equipment...because I hate making trees!

My real advice is to get busy and build something. That's the best way to know what really works...and what doesn't.

Woodie



____________________
It doesn't matter if you win or lose, its' how you rig the game.
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Jan 15th, 2016 07:13 pm
  PMQuoteReply
10th Post
Alwin
Registered


Joined: Sat Jun 29th, 2013
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 635
Status: 
Offline
I had my doubts about at least one place in the trackplan. So I made a quick drawing to check. See the gray line at the right side (from A to A).
With a normal curve it is right on the trestle. So you have to change the starting point of the trestle or make a change in the trackplan.



Personally I like the lower part the best. The logging part is to much on a smal area. The logging camp is to small ans why make a railline to the log loading area? Just place a donkey on the bottom of the hill to pull the logs down.
But that is my opinion.

What if you forget about the logging stuff and make the upper part a staging area? End the line by the mine. That saves you already 5 switches ( the mine only need 1 track), or use the switches for the staging area. No problems with the trestle. Less scenery to do. Turn the sawmill in a kind of factory.

Just an idea.

Alwin

Back To Top


 Current time is 01:16 pm
Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  

Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > HO & OO Scale > Lets talk about building my first layout
Top



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems