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Roundhouse - On30 - 1:48 Scale Build
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 Posted: Tue Feb 19th, 2019 11:13 pm
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Tom Ward
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Thanks Mike. 
I bought this from you back in '08 or early '09 and you were very helpful in getting me everything I needed to get started.
 
I let my own fears of painting hold me back on finishing the kit. 
I don't think you can see the full effect of the paint in the previous photos. 
Each stone has multiple colors and each has a different look, very similar to real stone. 
It was completely by accident and the full effect didn't show up until after I wiped off the joint compound.
 
I'm pretty sure the compound polished the surface of the stones because the darker hue from the India Ink disappeared and left the multi-colored look. 
The final look didn't appear until that final step. 
I was so pleased with the final look I had to think for a while and make notes on what I had done to get it. 

The picture below is the best shot I can find to show the effect. 
It shows up best on the blurry wall in the background.

- Tom







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"When I die I want to go quietly in my sleep like my grandfather. Not screaming in terror like his passengers."
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 Posted: Tue Feb 19th, 2019 11:27 pm
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Tom Ward
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madmike3434 wrote: Googled it...    Mark Grubbs builds a roundhouse


Came up on here

https://www.finescalerr.com/smf/index.php?topic=1367.0



Mark did a beautiful job on his roundhouse. 
I've used those same photos for inspiration on mine.
 
I like the way he expanded the back of the building. 
I've been working on something similar but I wanted to keep the windows in the rear walls lined up with the tracks.
 
Right now my plan is to keep the inner stalls the same width and just push out the side walls a bit. 
I'll use partial walls to fill in the gaps at the two ends of the rear wall. 
That's the current plan. 
We'll see what actually happens when I get to that part.
 
BTW Mike.  I'm really impressed with the quality of your plaster castings. 
I didn't appreciate how good they were until I tried making my own molds and pouring my own wall sections. 
It ain't easy.

- Tom




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Tom Ward


"When I die I want to go quietly in my sleep like my grandfather. Not screaming in terror like his passengers."
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 Posted: Wed Feb 20th, 2019 12:33 am
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madmike3434
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I like the overall plan of:  turntable, roundhouse, power house, ash pit, coal, water tank, etc. 

That's going to be action central.



You're right the colours flowed more and took the sharp bite out of them.

A little tip, the back walls, take a zona saw and cut around the corner of the corner ones on the pilasters. 
Because what you need to do is step the back wall inwards 1/16 of an inch to add detail.
Also makes it easier to attach the sides to the ends and get a perfect fit.

The danger as you found out of using a wood glue, even weldbond, is that it does not hold on US GYPSUM hydrocal plaster.
I tried many many products and only HOUSEHOLD GOOP sold in home depot grabs and holds onto it.

Painting the inside walls, goop will just tear that paint off. 
I used 1/4" square wood pushed into the corner coated on two adjoining sides of the wood with a popsicle stick. 
Racking my brain trying to remember what to paint the inside walls with. 
Regular floquil just sinks right into the plaster and gets a weird finish, mostly mottled and splotchy.

If you're going to make molds to do hydrocal pouring, better step up the product and get dow corning silicon --- E type ----mold making kit.  
I dropped the laytex as being not suitable to turning out quality parts.
I wrote a lot on this site about how to make the molds, products to use. 
They are here but don't remember where.


mike lynch 


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 Posted: Wed Feb 20th, 2019 12:52 am
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madmike3434
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https://krayden.com/technical-data-sheet/dow_e_rtv_tds/

Here is a link to the product I found on Google.

It's mixed 10 parts rubber to 1 part liquid hardener.

mike lynch


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 Posted: Wed Feb 20th, 2019 01:03 am
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Tom Ward
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madmike3434 wrote: https://krayden.com/technical-data-sheet/dow_e_rtv_tds/

Here is a link to the product I found on Google.

It's mixed 10 parts rubber to 1 part liquid hardener.


Cool! 

I've seen photos of the pros using what this must be.  I'll give it a try. 

Thanks mucho Mike.

- Tom




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"When I die I want to go quietly in my sleep like my grandfather. Not screaming in terror like his passengers."
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 Posted: Wed Feb 20th, 2019 02:06 am
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madmike3434
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Okay, stir the mix, don't whip it up, only creates bubbles.
I used cleaned large margarine containers to mix the rubber and hardener.

Make a balsa wood box around your part to copy, leaving 1/2" clearance around each side.
Glue it directly to 1/4" thick GLASS BASE.
Making sure all wood is coated on bottom with Weldbond glue so nothing can weep out of seams.

The part to be copied should be perfectly smooth so nothing gets under this.
I used DRAFT STOP a peelable window draft caulk, so you can get item off surface.

To determine how much rubber I needed, I used washing machine powder soap,
using wifes mixing / measuring things and keeping accurate count of how many it took to cover the part in the wood box.
This stuff is expensive and you don't want to waste any.

So if your used 30 measuring spoon things and the ratio is 10--1, you need 3.
Back to wifes cooking things, you need a mixing/stirring spatula.
Get rubber out of tub and spatula it into measuring spoon thing, Clean off spatula, flatten surface.
Now spatula the rubbber into the margerine container. Until you get the amount needed.

Make sure the object to be coated is perfectly clean and no bits of laundry detergent remain !!!!!

Ready to start ??
Put the hardener into the rubber using measuring spoon and spatula.
Now mixed the two together back and forth, round and round, not whipping it up.
Scrap spatula on container and using paper towel clean spatula off.

This stuff only has an open shelf life of 2 hours if mixed correctly at 10--1.
Watch the surface as the rubber is going to start to DE-GAS and bubbles will form on the surface.
Take a hammer and drum next to the marg container to get as many bubbles up as possible.
Use a plastic spoon to get the bubbles off keeping in mind your max 2 hours.


Ready ??
Pour the rubber over the part that is on a LEVEL SURFACE.
Back to drum hammering next to mold box as bubbles continue to surface.
You want the bubbles if any down low and trapped to float up.
Once they reach the upper surface doesn't matter its the surface of the part that matters.

Okay your done, mark down time and leave it alone in the warm basement 75 degrees for 24 hours.

To get the wood frame off, slip a breakaway knife under the wood to separate it from the glass.
Now take that same breakaway blade and run it right next to the wood on the inside and separate the wood from rubber.

Start in a corner and with your hands peel the rubber away from the part, its not easy.!!!!
You may break the old part but if you made a quality mold doesn't matter, you can now make 1000 + duplicates.
With no degradation to the quality of the parts.
You can pour hydrocal directly into it without having to support the mold.

Lot more work than most people think of.
Last time I bought a container of the rubber and hardener cost around $35.00
Something tells me I got to use a tub of rubber to do each of those rear walls, was about 28 measuring spoons.


Prepping the mold to mix & pour hydrocal into it is another chapter.

I learned 90% of this myself, Tom Yorke was useless with info.


madmike3434 mike lynch


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 Posted: Wed Feb 20th, 2019 02:15 am
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pipopak
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Noticed that the words "kitchen" and "wife's stuff" show up very often.

Be ready to buy something as "reparations" or "sorry" so outrageously expensive that the cost of the casting materials will pale in comparison...

Been there, done that...

Jose.




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 Posted: Wed Feb 20th, 2019 03:36 am
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Tom Ward
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"okay, stir the mix, don't whip it up , only creates bubbles"

Mike - This is great info, making the silicone molds.  Thanks for sharing that. 

I put so much time into making my latex molds it wasn't funny. 
Plus I had to make wood frame supports for them so they'd lay flat when I poured in the plaster. 
Can't wait to try this out.

Bubbles were the biggest pain for me in pouring plaster. 
I used the technique you describe for getting them out of the silicone and it worked really well. 
Since I made wood frames for my molds I just tapped my hammer on the sides and bottom rapidly,
and it worked the bubbles up through the plaster. 
The castings came out pretty clean.

- Tom




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 Posted: Wed Feb 20th, 2019 04:07 am
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pipopak
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Be CAREFUL when putting any container under negative pressure.

It may implode and shrapnel will fly all over the place.

Jose.





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 Posted: Wed Feb 20th, 2019 04:24 am
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madmike3434
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pipopak wrote: Noticed that the words "kitchen" and "wife's stuff" show up very often.

Be ready to buy something as "reparations" or "sorry" so outrageously expensive that the cost of the casting materials will pale in comparison...

Been there, done that..


Make the borrowed stuff squeaky clean, and she who must be obeyed, will be none the wiser. 

Or go out and buy the items needed.


mike lynch   


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