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corv8
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First, I hope nobody feels I swamp the forum with boring trolley stuff.... 

I am idle at home right now and finish all those projects,
that are hidden in countless boxes all around the house.


This days trolley was imported by Model Traction Systems in 1959....
It was their very first model, and it was sold as a unpainted body only.
 
The purchaser was on their own re completing it....
Wonder how many never turned a wheel on any layout??


I have a special affection for those cars....
The prototypes were sold off, when NY shut down the streetcar lines,
and sold cars to Vienna, my hometown, and Egypt.

They were too wide for all but three (ex steam tramway) lines in Vienna,
and orphans from day one. 

I rode them several times as a boy and was mucho impressed!


As I have accumulated four of them....
I felt it can be justified to paint at least one for my private line.

So, it got a coat of yellow, and a white window band,
like two other models I painted recently.
 

Just now, I have cut floor extensions,
for an old trolley drive, that is from the same era.

And, I have glued a can motor, out of a remote car mirror, to the floor,
and have pressed the spring belt pulley on its shaft. 

Shaft was undersize, so put some shrink tubing on it....
Easier to do than brass bushings. Worked well for me many times.





Ken C
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Gerold

I am amazed you keep managing to get the traction models up and running,

from days long past.  :apl: :apl: :apl:


One day I may get a bit of traction modelling done,

way to many projects on the go at the moment though.

:bg:


Nice Guy Eddie
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" First, I hope nobody feels I swamp the forum with boring trolley stuff.... "



I love being swamped with excellent modeling and photos

Your electrical, mechanical and painting is second to none !


Boring trolley stuff ?


I have certainly learned a lot from reading your cool Threads

Upgrading and refurbishing old vintage gear is a great feeling


:f:


Eddie


corv8
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Nice Guy Eddie wrote
I love being swamped with excellent modeling and photos

Your electrical, mechanical and painting is second to none !


Boring trolley stuff ?


I have certainly learned a lot from reading your cool Threads

Upgrading and refurbishing old vintage gear is a great feeling


Eddie, and all... 

I want to thank you all for the good camaraderie here.

Although I do different things than most of you, I feel right at home here.... 
A situation I hadn't had too often, at other places.

Here are people who love to tinker with strange contraptions,
and share their knowledge and experience.

No mainstream, no rivet counters!  Great!! 
And, a opportunity to see new stuff I never would have expected to exist.

Thanks.
Have much more weird stuff  coming up.


Michael M
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Gerold

I've always had a fondness for trolleys and interurbans.

I have a number of books on the Pacific Electric, along with other California electrics.


I had a few Suydam models many many years ago.

It's great to see what you can do, to bring these old models back to life.


ebtnut
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Out local trolley museum has one of these cars that they run occasionally.
They got it from Vienna back in the '70's.

I was a member back then and got to run it sometimes.
Really nice car, with self-lapping air brakes.

I've been trying to get a trolley line installed on the club layout up in PA.
Distance has been a factor (I live over 200 miles away).

And the club has decided to blow up the city area, so all that track had to come up
(it needed to be done, so I'm not upset about it).

Biggest problem is that almost all the Bachmann and Bowser models have had split gear issues.
Won't the Chinese learn, for a few cents more, they can have long term reliable models?


corv8
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Michael M wrote:
I've always had a fondness for trolleys and interurbans.
I have a number of books on the Pacific Electric along with other California electrics.

I had a few Suydam models many many years ago.
It's great to see what you can do to bring these old models back to life.


Michael, ýou mention Suydam's models.... 

My Father gave me a subscription to MR, for my 14th Birthday. 


In one of those magazines I found a review of a PE car.
Think it was the #1407 RPO converted from a Portland coach,and I was hooked.

Of course, at 14, this thing was so far out of reach as the moon....  
Took me 40 years to get one of those.


Michael M
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Gerold

I'm sure you remember Richard Orr's products. 

Especially his single-point turnouts.

Somewhere I know I got some of his stuff stashed away.


corv8
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ebtnut wrote: Out local trolley museum has one of these cars that they run occasionally.
They got it from Vienna back in the '70's.

I was a member back then and got to run it sometimes.
Really nice car, with self-lapping air brakes.

Biggest problem is that almost all the Bachmann and Bowser models,
have had split gear issues.


Think there are quite many preserved.
 
Three on the East Coast, one in England, at least three in Austria,
although one is in very dilapted condition.

At which museum did you volunteer?


Really? Bowser gears have this issue too? 


corv8
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Michael M wrote
I'm sure you remember Richard Orr's products.  Especially his single-point turnouts.

Somewhere I know I got some of his stuff stashed away.


I have a few of those.

They were sold in my local hobbyshop in Vienna too! 
However, I haven't laid street trackage yet.

Have provided a ROW for a trolley loop when building the layout,
but until now they have to use the mainline.


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Gerold,

Where do you find those spring belts?

ebtnut
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Gerold

It was at the National Capital Trolley Museum in suburban D.C.

Luckily, it was not caught in the big carhouse fire they had a number of years back,
they lost a significant portion of their collection.

The Bowser NOPS model split a gear on me after only a few hours of running.
I think those models were made in China.


corv8
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Michael M wrote:
Where do you find those spring belts?


He he.... big secret..... 

Basically, most cars still have the original ones....
or, I install a power truck set, this usually includes the belts. 

They should last forever, as long as they don't get lost.
 
However, I collect each and every small (car) engine seal,
that is discarded at our repair shop....
 
Especially those with a diameter of maybe 1 to 2",
those have a spring that is similar to the spring belts.

I cut them to length with a Xuron track cutter,
then bend up the first winding with a knife, so I may  lock the ends together.

This is the nasty part.... I barely see the ends by now, it's even hard with a magnifier,
and it has to be done with the belt already in the truck....
You can't install a spring belt when it is connected. 

There are several "strengths" of those springs in seals.  Many are too strong/ hard. 
I have a small box of them, and try to use a "soft" one that matches the original.


corv8
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ebtnut wrote:
It was at the National Capital Trolley Museum in suburban D.C.
 
Luckily, it was not caught in the big carhouse fire they had a number of years back,
they lost a significant portion of their collection.


I remember the fire.... 

Intended to visit in the Ninetys, when I was in Washington.

However when I drove out from Georgetown in a taxi cab,
I found that I had selected the day the museum was closed.


corv8
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Finished....

Well, lettering still missing.

Drive gave me headaches....
Can motor had an internal bridge from one brush to the ground,
and current went through the spring belt making it smoke ! 

Had to cut open the motor,
as the crimping was too strong to open without damage.

Then tinkered with tension of pickup wires for hours,
until they still were effective but didn't produce too much drag.

The single axle drive works ok,
only in the direction where the torque acts to press the driven axle  down,
in the opposite direction it has considerably less tractive effect. 





I installed prototypically incorrect window shades,
to hide the motor which was a real eyesore.

Usually I prefer underfloor drives,
but wanted to complete this car with period components as far as practical. 





John Teall
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Trolley stuff is never boring.





corv8
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One more TARS car finished.... 

Bought it locally when an O-gauge model RR club,
disposed of a deceased members goodies....
 

Was fascinated again, by the weird Maximum Traction trucks....

Did some research,
and found these cars ran on plain Brill trucks, when in New York.

Frugal TARS management swapped those useful trucks,
against obsolete Maximum Traction trucks,
when they sold the cars to San Diego.


Painted it completely with rattle cans....
Have no place where I can use my airbrush right now. 






Removed the bulky old motor, and substituted a can motor,
I had once pirated from a dead printer. 

Runs good on DCC.
 
Had a hard time to install additional pickup wipers,
in these tiny trucks.


Also took me a full hour,
to squeeze the 2mm LEDs in the headlights from inside.
 
As this thing has very long vestibules,
and I had to manipulate those LEDs with long bent tweezers. 






David Laughery
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I really like this car. 

Great modeling.  Thanks for sharing. 


What scale do you model ? 

Regards, Dave L.


corv8
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David Laughery wrote:  
I really like this car. 

What scale do you model ? 


Dave

Glad you like it.


I am mostly in HO,

but have started to build a (HO) narrow gauge layout this year.


corv8
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Full of enthusiasm because the TARS car works ok,

I took another trolley from the cabinet that gave me headaches some weeks ago. 





A high quality MTS Philadelphia "Peter Witt" type...

Very nicely excecuted underfloor drive, all wheel pickup....
Tinkered all evening with pickups and headlight wiring.

Now it runs ok, and the headlight works.
Seems those tiny wipers did make intermittent contact.


This was the car that introduced me to brass trolleys, in the late Nineties.
 
Purchased it for an outrageous price at the annual Vienna model show.
It was the first brass streetcar I saw with my own eyes.


David Laughery
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Gerold

I am curious about the HO narrow gauge layout you are working on. 

Is it HOn30 using N-gauge track ? 

I've dabbled in HOn30 for over fifty years. 

Regards, Dave L.


corv8
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David Laughery wrote: 
I am curious about the HO narrow gauge layout you are working on. 

Is it HOn30 using N-gauge track ? 


Dave

It's - like my main layout,
a device to watch + enjoy my numerous models. 

No fancy scenery (maybe later) no turntable + roundhouse,
no train order operations, no industries to switch. 

Basically a mainline with a rudimentary yard area to lay over trains,
and a few scenic accents to make it less boring. 


The background to the future N.G. layout is that I also - like you,
have been fascinated by those tiny critters (EGGER!) for fifty years. 

Frustrated by the lousy performance,
I have stored them in the most remote corners of my house. 

Now, with acceptably running models available, I want to give it a try.
And, as I have bought some HOn3 brass models in the last ten years. 


Plan was to add narrow gauge track to the main layout.
Abandoned the idea as mainline + trolley track is already enough.

So the N.G. layout will have US style HOn3 (11mm) on ground level,
and HOn2 (9mm) on higher ground, with trestles and truss bridges.


Want to operate anything that runs on 9mm there, old Egger locos,
new Bemo and Minitrains stuff, and a number of scratchbuilt oddities.


David Laughery
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Sounds like a lot of fun, to me. 

HOn3 meant brass engines (and prices),
so when HOn30 appeared in the 1970s I was interested. 

Recent MiniTrains stuff got me thinking N.G. again. 

I still hope to get a tiny layout started (with the help of a friend),
for the few engines and rolling stock I have. 

Shapeways parts will help converting a lot of N-scale to HOn30. 

Regards, Dave L.


corv8
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Next one... 

Resin body, pirated by 'Funaro & Camerlengo', from a brass model. 
A really perfect resin casting. 

What was less perfect are my painting skills.

Why did nobody remind me ?
Resin castings are supposed to be washed, so the paint will adhere.


Big mess...

Looked nice, but paint came of when pulling the masking tape. 
Washed the thing with Alcohol, then started at zero.


Benefit was I had learned how to apply masking tape in a smarter way.

Painted the front window area first in silver, then masked it,
painted the body yellow, then the side window area + roof silver.

This because I found it very hard to mask the yellow front sash,
when painting the front windows later


Quite happy now,
have an old new Halling Zuerich streetcar drive that fits nicely.   





David Laughery
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Really nice work on that body casting !!

I eventually settled on Scotch Magic Tape,
when masking painting jobs,
masking tape never worked for me.

Looks like you have it down pretty well !

Regards, Dave L.


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Gerold

Just curious.

With the resin casting,
how does it stand up to hot weather ? (40 deg+)


Many years ago I bought a wagon made of cast resin,
and when I picked the model up from the track after completing the build,
it immediately became banana shaped.

I would think compounds and ingredients have improved since the '70s.
I have thought of trying resin casts again, as mould technologies have improved.


You have a nice looking model there,
you should be very happy with the result.

...............Peter.


corv8
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Peter

A question that worries me for a long time.


One of my first interurbans,
I casted - maybe 20 years ago ? - with resin from Micromark.
 
That was easy to work with and cheap, but was never finished,
and I stored the body somewhere out of sight.

Years later when I dug it out, it was a banana too !
It was bent upward in the middle.


Another, which I had finished, developed a light "sag" while on display.
This is slight only, and may occur on a prototype too.

Other models remained stable over decades. 


Maybe I got the mix wrong ? Maybe a bad charge ? we will never know.
However, all remain hard - none ever became soft.

But I think I never exposed any to the full heat of the sun.


A friend who is in automobile modeling, told me a trick to fix distorted models,
is to put them in hot water, then bend them into shape.


corv8
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Another worry...

How will all those 3D-printed models stand up to the challenges of time ?

Nobody knows now.


2foot6
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I tried straightening a model years ago in hot water,
and it worked out very well until the next hot day.


When I think of the old 1950s Tri-ang models I had years ago,
they are still around, although maybe starting to get brittle,
but they have lasted well.

As for todays plastic models that are very finely detailed and super light,
time will tell how long they will last, I don't think they will last 50 years.

As for the old 1970s resin models, there are still many of them around,
probably on shelves or in boxes, as some Aussie models weren't finely detailed,
and they were so heavy, but they are still around in large numbers.


At this point in my life, if they last another twenty years they will out do me,
maybe I should start a contest to see what lasts the longest. Haha.

:old dude: :glad:  ;)  :2t:

..........Peter


corv8
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Slow progress on Osgood Bradley trolley... 


This is a Halling Zürich three truck articulated drive,
robbed of the center truck and suitably shortened. 

Cheap Mashima motor which works fine in this application,
plain Lenz decoder mounted low.


Love those drives,
as they allow free view through all windows. 





Here is the underside.

Trucks are designed so they may be used for 12mm 11mm and 9mm track,
by simply shortening axles. 

Think some of my smaller trolleys may migrate to the narrow gauge roster. 





Kitbash0n30
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Nice mechanism work.


Will be interesting to see what might migrate,

whenever that might happen.



corv8
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Ok, what happened this morning, 1 AM.... 
The holy smoke exited the decoder. 

Did a test run, and placed a weight on the chassis,
somehow the loose wires came in contact.


Later today....
Cleaned the sideframes from casting flash + painted them.

Finished glazing of the body.
 
Painted two 2mm LEDs black, preventing interior illuminating,
and glued them in the headlights.


Also have installed a new decoder, and did another test run.



Now wonder where to place unobtrusive weights,
especially over the power truck.


corv8
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Finished this thing....  Ok, still no decals. 

Have now a dozen yellow streetcars standing in the display cabinet without lettering.
Quite relaxing to build such a car with a resin body.

One of the nastiest perils, usually is contact of the LEDs wires to the brass carbody,
which results in immediate smoke from the decoder. 





2foot6
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A very good looking result Gerold.

:apl:  :apl:  :apl:

.....Peter





David Laughery
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Great model !

Regards, Dave L.

:thumb:



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